BELOVED HOMELAND, UNCOVERING FOR THE SECOND TIME - in 10 pts
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TadWysocki



Joined: 29 Nov 2012
Replies: 52

PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2013 8:45 am    Post subject: BELOVED HOMELAND, UNCOVERING FOR THE SECOND TIME - in 10 pts Reply with quote

Hi all friends from this genforum, I want to join you! I want to support the webpage of my best friend Zenon, here are the 10 parts I'm ready to fulfill for all searchers, I know some of you are using the same search tools with the best positive results, I do hope I can help as well, below are these 10 points with the surname Rynkiewicz and place name Mscichy as an example, hope all will be loaded correctly, with the most cordial greetings!:
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BELOVED HOMELAND, UNCOVERING FOR THE SECOND TIME -
Surname & Origin - Meaning, Cultural Value and Heritage, base info in 10 parts
Crossing Polish databases
by Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki, Warsaw, Poland 2013


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Dear Family from the U.S., and other countries,

Every brave immigrant from old Poland about 100 years ago, traveling 3.000 miles over unknown waters to start a new life as the best American patriot, deserves homage and remembrance. Every day, people all over the world take their first steps to exploring their Polish heritage. Many of them find their way to Polish Origins to learn where to begin. For all of you on the search path, I would like to offer my genealogy expertise and databases to provide you with the foundations of your Polish Origins.

The 10-point foundation includes 10 essential pieces of information to help you to finish the first step of the search, and/or to supplement your family history research:
1. The Surname Meaning & Origin
2. The Surname Spelling and Variations
3. The Origin Home
4. The Family Life in the 19th century and earlier, Imaginable Virtual Tour
5. The Origin Family Province
6. The Origin Family Parish, Church & Cemetery
7. The Surname Location in the present-day country
8. The Family records in the local parish, etc.
9. The Family records in the state archives, etc.
10. The Family records in the U.S. with FHL/LDS microfilms
The Summary

From you, I need at least the name(s) of the family preserved in the U.S. after immigration (so many changed), and any clues to the name of the home village or town in Poland. Please send me all of the information you/your family have preserved in the U.S., every detail could be decisive in this search and my special analysis/story crossing databases of surnames and places in an old and present-day Poland.

Please allow a few weeks, and I will do my best to help you to uncover your history and family roots - the most valuable family memory treasure on the planet. So sorry if I will be not able in my first work to locate all you are looking for.

==

Here is an example of my work with the surname Rynkiewicz, and finally found out with the surname location the family origin Mscichy, the right surname and place name was found and located after crossing the relevant search databases in Poland included in parts 1-7 as given below:

Part 1. The Surname Meaning & Origin, Cultural Value and Ethnic Heritage

The Polish surname Rynkiewicz is cognominal in origin, belonging to that group of surnames derived from the Polish language and word "rynek", meaning a town market place, and/or from the word "rynka", meaning a small stew-pan, and/or from Germany language and name "Rink". The surname originated from the old name Rynka, Professor Rymut's work says the name Rynka appears in Polish records as early as 1565. The surname is also found in the variant forms Rynk, Rynkal, Rynkas, Rynkel, Rynkewicz, Renkiewicz, Ryn~kiewicz, Rynkowicz (1561), Rinkiewicz, Rynko, Rynkon, Rynkun, Rynkus, Rynkar, Rynkarz, Runkart, Rynek (1563), Rynecki, Rynka, Rinka, Rink, Rinke, Rinkiel, etc. As the basic Polish root of the surname (suffix -icz), and word rynek and rynka, I suppose you might find that the surname Rynkiewicz applied to the first ancestor in Poland who was a local artisan and trader at markets and fairs (in Polish targi), trading with a stew-pans. For centuries, local fairs (targi) were the site of much of the trade in many bigger and smaller towns in Poland.

[An option after checking relevant sources with old Polish Gentry - Szlachta surnames: The surname was born by a Polish notable families of .........., Boniecki's Herbarz Polski [Polish Armorial] mentions a .......... family of the ....... coat of arms, including ..... who owned ...... in .... province as of ..... So, there was at least .. families surnamed ........ Of course, there is no guarentee every ........ was noble. Only a deeper genealogical research of your family history could establish any links with the old Polish noble ............s. It must be noted many Polish Gentry - Szlachta families lost their noble rights mainly in the 19th century as beeing substantially pauperized.
Finally, this surname notable arms COA is illustrated on this webpage: ........................, you can read more about Polish gentry noble [Szlachta] history, roots and heritage on this webpage: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szlachta ]


Source: Best Polish etymologist Prof. Kazimierz Rymut's work "Nazwiska Polakow, Slownik Historyczno-Etymologiczny", [The Surnames of Poles, the Historical-Etymological Directory], Krakow, 1999-2001, and other Polish etymological works as "Slownik Najstarszych Nazwisk Polskich Pochodzenie Jezykowe" by Prof. Zofia Kowalik-Kaleta, Leonarda Dacewicz, and Beata Raszewska-Zurek, "Historia Nazwisk Polskich" by Zofia Kowalik-Kaleta", "The Surname as a Cultural Value and an Ethnic Heritage" by Zofia Kaleta, "Slownik Gwar Polskich" by Jan Karlowicz, "Herbarz Polski" by Adam Boniecki and Artur Reiski, Franciszek Czaykowski „Regestr Diesezjow czyli wlasciciele ziemscy w Koronie 1783 – 1784” z przypisami i wstepem Krzysztofa Chlapowskiego i Slawomira Gorzyckiego, and other etymological and historical works.

Part 2. The Name/Surname Spelling

To hear how your Polish family name sounds in Polish, go to http://www.ivona.com/pl/ - type in the text field and press on "PLAY". Be sure to use the name(s) with Polish diacritical marks given in this analysis. Enjoy the listening the original spelling of your family name(s) from Poland.

Part 3. The Origin Home in old Poland/Russia

Grandpa's beloved birthplace and childhood home, and his family's ancestral home, was very possibly the town of Mscichy located in the north-eastern part of Poland, with rich historical and religious roots and heritage. From this historical source, from abt 1827/1880, we have the following historical description of the family origin/home from the 19th century:

Mscichy (fully spelled in Polish as Mścichy, s with Polish grammar diacritical mark over the letter), and also as Mscichy-Jaglowek (Mścichy-Jagłówek):

# The village and manor farm, were located on the river Klimaszewnica/Biebrza, pow. (powiat-administrative county) szczucinski (means of the local town of Szczuczyn), gmina (community) and parish Radzilow. It was located about 21 km from Szczuczyn, on the right border of the gubernia (Russian administrative province) grodzienska (means of the town of Grodno), on the edge of the wide marsh valley of the river Biebrza. In 1827, Mscichy contained approximately 26 homes, and 157 inhabitants, of which one of these homes and inhabitants were very probably your family, ...
# This place Mscichy was noted in Poland under the following names (as would be important in any further family roots and genealogical search): Jaglowka (1471, 1472), Mszczychy (1497), Mszczychi (1505), Mscichy Wierzch Jedlowka (1524), Msczych de Wyerch Iyodlowka (1525), Msczichi (1537), Mschichy (1577), Mschichy Jaglowka (1577), Mscichy Jaglowka (1598), Mscichy (1783, 1827, 1885, 1921, 1973) ; generally the name derived from the village/settlement Mscichy first settler named Mscislaw.

Source: "Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego...." [The Geographical Directory of the Kingdom of Poland ...], Krakow, Warszawa, 1880-1902, "Nazwy Miejscowe Polski Historia Pochodzenie Zmiany" [The Names of the Local Places in Poland History Origin Changes" by Prof. K. Rymut team, Krakow 1996-2007, and other historical and geographical works.

Part 4. The Family Life in the 19th century, including imaginable virtual tour

Most families in the village of Mscichy were farmers. Mscichy is located in the beautiful north-eastern part of Poland, on the Biebrza river, where it also borders a deep forest. To imagine and collect some informatiton on the family everyday life in the past, you can view some images and hints from the following webpages:

The family every-day life was focused on their Monday-Saturday hard work on fields and woods, with local river Biebrza, here is some images of the local nature of the Biebrza National Park and river: http://poland.pl/poland/51,125609,11611670.html?i=3 ; Their home was like one of these of Podlachia, that have been preserved in Poland: http://grzegorzsabala.blogspot.com/2012/03/stare-domy-podlasia.html ; their traditional folkore costumes - please go to and click on Podlachia/Podlasie part of map of Poland: http://www.perfekt.krakow.pl/map ; their traditional food and other folklore costume pictures: http://www.atrakcjepodlasia.pl/tradycje-podlasia.htm ; their traditional music for example Polish dance Oberek could be heard here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOGTMX3sPiI ; Their holy and rich religious life was focused on the RC family church and parish, in Radzilow (see the information and views in part 6) , the church was erected in 1482, and the family cemetery was also located there. Throughout the year, all of the family attended church every Sunday, to take part in Holy Sunday Mass. Their main religious celebrations and feasts were at Christmas and Easter. Here, you can view from a satellite, all of the the family local fields, and roads, including the road to the family church and cemetery in Radzilow. You can also see the river Biebrza, and the forest (you have to zoom + / - inorder to see more): http://wikimapia.org/#lang=pl&lat=53.419252&lon=22.453737&z=14&m=h

The more local customs and traditions having influence on the family behaviour can be investigated on-site, and with historical sources.

Finally, trying to find any local monument connected to your Polish ancestors' life, here is a very old wooden cross, preserved in the village Mscichy, and dated from the 18th century, This was a votum, founded by the Mscichy inhabitants, to stop the epidemium that killed many family members. The local legend states that the epidemium ended when the cross was constructed: http://radzilow.pl/media/zabytki/mscichy/1.jpg

Please note also that in this present-day village of Mscichy, you can find the following additional monuments: the brick chapel from the early 20th century; the wooden family home from the 20th century; and the house of clay, from the end of the 19th century.

+ Family History-Emigration
After the political partitions of Poland, at the end of the 18th Century, and into the 19th century, this area was under the rule of the Russian Tzar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partitions_of_Poland. Every-day life was very hard for most families, and many contributions had to be paid to Russia. It was at this time that many young men were forced to serve in the Russian army. Many of these men were killed and wounded during their time in Russian service, and this was a contributing factor in the large number of Poles resettling in Europe and America. Many families decided to sell part or all of their farmland, to buy railway tickets to European ship ports, and then tickets for ship passage to America. This was an opportunity to give them and their descendants, a chance to have a better life and future, in the United States. Once settled in America, many of the immigrants found work as miners, farmers, factory workers, etc., The steady employment enabled many to send money back to their family in Poland , to pay for others to immigrate to the U.S., or for helping them in their everyday life, under Russia’s harsh control.Many family contacts have been lost in the 20th century because of WWII , and after that with the 45 years of Russian communist rule in Poland.

Part 5. The Origin Polish Home/Province, the hyperlink(s)

From the present-day Poland, here is your family ancestral home Mscichy with Polish Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C5%9Bcichy,_Grajewo_County
Base geographical/historical info about the family ancestral province of Poland PODLASIE/PODLACHIA with the hyperlink from Wikipedia, giving more additional weblinks::
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Podlachia
If you like to visit virtually your family PODLASIE/PODLACHIA Poland now, here is the movie about, enjoy the tour:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoJUyKp5fDY

Part 6. The Origin Polish Parish, Church & Cemetery, the hyperlink(s)

About the family ancestral parish and town RADZILOW with Wikipedia, giving the history of the local place and area, including the 20th century:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radzi%C5%82%C3%B3w

The image of your Polish family ancestral and holy church where your ancestor was baptized could be seen on this webpage, this is an old wooden church from Radzilow located now in in Konarzewo, and replaced from the Radzilow in 1982: http://radzilow.net/?id=80&dzial=gm - as the new church in Radzilow was constructed.

The local and family cemetery in this Radzilow could be seen from air here: http://wikimapia.org/#lang=pl&lat=53.414034&lon=22.409572&z=18&m=h

Part 7. The Surname Location in the present-day Poland

From Prof. K. Rymut's works, I can give you the surname location in present-day Poland:
7.1. Based on the Polish census 1990:
The largest numbers, , lived in the county of in the northwestern part of Poland, there were .. in the city of ......, .. in the city of ...., ........
Thus, the surname crest might be located in ...............
7.2. Based on the Polish census 2002:
The largest numbers, , lived in the county of in the northwestern part of Poland, there were .. in the city of ......, .. in the city of ....., ...........
Thus, the surname crest might be located in ...............
7.3. Based on the old Polish white pages on CDs, here is the surname location in the local area in the present-day Poland:
In this village MSCICHY are still living the following families surnamed Rynkiewicz: (so, the full postal address would be available to obtain)
#
#
#
In the nearly located villages/local towns are living the following families surnamed Rynkiewicz: (so, the full postal address would be available to obtain)
#
#
#
Source: Polish census 1990/Surname location and website www.herby.com.pl, Polish census 2002/Surname location and "Slownik nazwisk uzywanych w Polsce na poczatku XXI wieku" by Kazimierz Rymut available also in webpage http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/, old Polish white pages CDs, and other sources including Polish internet.

Part 8. The Family records located in the Polish local parish, and if available in Polish Geneteka, and other works (church/civil indexes/records, etc.) - to confirm points 1-6:
In this local parish there are the following church/civil records - years:

With Polish Geneteka (indexes on-line):

With other works:

Source: KTM [Katalog Zasobow Metrykalnych] and GENETEKA of the PTG Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne [Polish Genealogical Society] as the part of the website www.genealodzy.pl
and other works [ for example open church/civil records from 1592 of town/parish Kunow, given on my open website Narodowa.pl - http://www.narodowa.pl/Znaczki/18/eksponat.htm ]


Part 9. The Family records available in the Polish archives - to confirm points 1-6:

Location of the archival records/indexes with the Polish Archives and system PRADZIAD (GFather) plus other search systems, covering the church/civil books from the family parish/home as survived:

Please use the PRADZIAD base search engine typing the name of the parish Radzilow:
http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en
Urodzenia = Births (dates, places, names, godparents, other info)
Malzenstwa = Marriages (dates, places, names, witnesses, other info)
Zgony = Deaths (dates, places, names, including information about diseases, etc.)
Inne zapisy = Other Sources
The other records and information may be available in Polish state, court, local archives, etc.

Part 10. The Family records available in the U.S., with FHL/LDS microfilm(s)- to confirm points 1-6:

Location of the archival records with the FHL/LDS microfilms of the Polish local church/civil books - to research all family certificates/records that might be ordered by you via your local library from the FHL/LDS centre in Salt Lake City:

Parish Radzilow church books, survived, and microfilmed, the microfilm detailed number(s) can be found with the FHL/LDS search engine, please type the name of the parish Radzilow:
https://familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=localitysearch&columns=*,0,0
Urodzen = Births (dates, [places, names, godparents, etc.)
Malzenstw = Marriages (dates, places, names, witnesses, etc.)
Zgonow = Deaths (dates, places, names, including information about diseases, etc.)

Inne zapisy = Other sources

The Summary

Optionally: The above points .... give a very interesting base of family history information. Chances are very good that a deeper research will be successful, and shed more light on your family history from Europe and Poland, including the family church/civil records, local traditions, and/or location of close or distant relatives in present-day Poland.
Optionally: The points .... are still open, please help me with the [American] databases in uncovering them, I will do my utmost in all further search in Poland.


Genealogy is invaluable in investigating ancestry, where the genetics plus epigenetics and traditional genealogy must be supplemented, the first one basing on DNA molecular analysis, but the second one basing on all origin names, and on very exact geographical places with specific nature, local traditions, customs, and the history of local diseases - all giving the roots also for future science, together with personal and family medicine.
==================================
by Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki, Warsaw, Poland 2013
RootsPoland
openly for my friends from PolishOrigins!
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TC



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
Replies: 8
Location: California

PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ted, I have 2 paternal family names I need help with.
1) My family name: Ciesielski, possibly from Olesnica. My grandfather Tomasz Joseph Ciesielski born 12/21/1884 in Poland emigrated to the US in 1907. Upon arrival, he lived in Cleveland, OH. There, Tomasz married Antonina Labacz (of Senjny/Pokrowsk/Giby) in 1910. In Cleveland, they had two sons, Walter and Anthony (my father), then moved to Hamtramck, MI. In Hamtramck, they had 6 other children: John, Mary, Stanley, Joan, Marion, Eugenia. Tomasz died 9/1952.
I know he had a brother Jan Ciesielski born June 18, 1888. Jan emigrated from Olesnica in 1906. Jan lived in the Saginaw, MI area married to Mary Zelyan(?). They had 4 children I know of: Lucien, Jan, Emily and Eleanore. I do not know specifically of other direct brothers or sisters, but it would seem based on Tomasz/Jan's age difference there would be others. Also, I am not 100% sure of Tomasz/Jan's parents names or any of their grandparents. I think Tomasz's father may have been named either Jozef or Jacob. Tomasz's mother may have been Katarzyna Czarnecki(?). My dad told the story of how my grandfather spoke fluent Russian. He spoke of how my great grandfather (Tomasz's dad) was a young soldier, conscripted into service. He was stationed to guard the city gates watching for any intruders (Russian soldiers?). Unfortunately, just before his tour of duty was complete, he contracted consumption and died. I don't believe my great grandmother ever came to the US.
2) Tomasz's wife, my grandmother Antonina Labacz born in 1887 in Sejny/Giby Poland. She emigrated to the US in 1909 directly to the Cleveland area (staying with her brother in law Jozef Skrzenta). I do not know much more about my grandmother's family; parents, siblings etc. I believe her father's name was Jozef and her mother's name name was Mary Kreitzman/Krajesman, neither of them came to the US as I understand.
I have done research on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch (LDS files) along with obit searches and findagrave cemetery searches.
Any help you can provide in more details of my grandparents/great grandparents or other siblings would be greatly appreciated.
Tom Ciesielski
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TadWysocki



Joined: 29 Nov 2012
Replies: 52

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom,
Confirmed, I will make my work in next days/weeks, in this case 2 analysis "1-10" with my remarks re Ciesielski and Labacz, pleasure to have occasion to help you in discovering your family Polish roots and European heritage.
Please note also, generally they are not open on-line family records in Poland, and I will give you the records accesibility.
With the best regards from your family old country open Poland,
Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw
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linda merkel



Joined: 07 Sep 2013
Replies: 2

PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Tad,
My name is Linda Merkel and I have hit the wall in my research.
My great grandfather Tomasz Forys: b. circa 1844 - d. 21 Feb 1925, Posadowa, hse. 12
his wife: Wiktora Bielanska: b. circa 1859 Zaluczne - d. 31 May 1918, Posadowa, hse. 12

Tomasz's father: Pawel Forys: no information
Pawel's wife: Anna Stafira: b. circa 1815 - d 1 January 1891, Posadowa, hse. 1

I would love any help on the Forys and Stafira end of this and also what siblings the Forys family had.

My great grandfather Piotr szczotkowski and his wife Salomea Gorka (or Gorska) are a bigger mystery.
I know Piotr was married three times. I also know he lived (and maybe even came from) Zurowa.
His father was: Antoni Szczotkowski and his mother was Marie Krochmal.
All and every bit of information is welcome. I appreciate all the hard work involved in uncovering the
past.
With blessings.
Linda
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Magroski49
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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Location: Joao Pessoa - Brazil

PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

linda merkel wrote:
Dear Tad,
My name is Linda Merkel and I have hit the wall in my research.
My great grandfather Tomasz Forys: b. circa 1844 - d. 21 Feb 1925, Posadowa, hse. 12
his wife: Wiktora Bielanska: b. circa 1859 Zaluczne - d. 31 May 1918, Posadowa, hse. 12

Tomasz's father: Pawel Forys: no information
Pawel's wife: Anna Stafira: b. circa 1815 - d 1 January 1891, Posadowa, hse. 1

I would love any help on the Forys and Stafira end of this and also what siblings the Forys family had.

My great grandfather Piotr szczotkowski and his wife Salomea Gorka (or Gorska) are a bigger mystery.
I know Piotr was married three times. I also know he lived (and maybe even came from) Zurowa.
His father was: Antoni Szczotkowski and his mother was Marie Krochmal.
All and every bit of information is welcome. I appreciate all the hard work involved in uncovering the
past.
With blessings.
Linda


Linda,

it seems to me you are looking for the same family Patricia posted in another forum:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/poland/messages/56233.html

Gilberto
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linda merkel



Joined: 07 Sep 2013
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 7:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Gilberto, it certainly seems there is a link here somewhere.
I don't believe the name "Forys" was very common....
thank you for your diligence.
Linda
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Magroski49
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

linda merkel wrote:
Thank you, Gilberto, it certainly seems there is a link here somewhere.
I don't believe the name "Forys" was very common....
thank you for your diligence.
Linda


And besides Forys, she also mentions Gorstka or close to it.

Gilberto
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jbudz922



Joined: 14 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tad

Thank you for your kind offer of help. A group of us have been working with Zenon and Marek to obtain information on families located in southwestern Podkarpackie.

I was hoping, when you get time, you could provide me with some leads for my grandmother's family. The Oga'rek s (Ogorek)from Bienkowka. It is a small Malopolskie town/village south of Radziszowka and near Gmina Budzow. It is south of route 52,west of E77 and north of route 28. My grandmother's name was Ludwika born 25-Dec-1888. We believe she had a brother or cousin Josef born 2-Jul-1882. On her marriage license it list her father as Francisci but her death certificate list him as Andrew.

Any leads would be greatly appreciated.

Jack Budz
budzjack@comcast.net
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TadWysocki



Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jack,

Thanks for your your message, and the origin of your Gma Ludwika's origin Bienkowka, so beatifully location in south Poland, amongts small hills, and on small local rivers, I like this kind of places, for all other visitors here is the image of the local lands: http://www.budzow.pl/

I will do my best to help you and Zenon, as they are not open on-line records from this part of Poland, and some points are for you clear, the following parts of my offer would to be crossed in my analysis:
1. The Surname Meaning & Origin
3. The Origin Home
7. The Surname Location in the present-day country

I will try to make it as first, today and tomorrow.

Greetings!

Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw
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patia928



Joined: 09 Sep 2012
Replies: 2

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 6:10 am    Post subject: For Tad Reply with quote

Tad Hi!
Forum, please forgive me for posting personal message for Tad

Tad: my friend.. I know our emails aren't working and here is
another one you might try
I received the one you sent via Stu
patia928928@gmail.com

I am leaving Oct 11 and will be Krakow on the 12.. you have Kasia's number.

Pat
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TadWysocki



Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pat, I have it from patia928928 !! Seems this address is OK.
HAPPY TOUR TO SLOVAKIA!
Your, Tad
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TadWysocki



Joined: 29 Nov 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack, here is my work, good luck in your further search!:

Crossing the following parts of my general analysis:
1. The Surname Meaning & Origin, Cultural Value and Ethnic Heritage
3. The Origin Home, supplemented by Origin Parish/Church and Cemetery
7. The Surname Location in the present-day country
Here are the search results:

"The Grandmother Ludwika Ogarek, and her origin Bienkowka, Poland"

1. THE SURNAME MEANING & ORIGIN

The Polish surname Ogarek is cognominal in origin, belonging to that group of surnames derived from the Polish language and word "Ogar", meaning the Polish hound, commonly known as Ogar Polski, is a breed of hunting dog indigenous to Poland, or the surname Ogarek main origin derived from the Polish language and word "Ogarek", meaning a candle-end. The family name Ogarek appears in Polish records as early as the year 1451. The surname is also found in the variant forms Ogarewicz, Ogarka, Ogarow, Ogarowski, Ogarski, Ogarzynski [fully spelled in Polish as Ogarzyński], Ohar, Ohara, etc. Regarding the history of the local place and parish, I suppose you might find that the surname Ogarek applied to the first ancestor in Poland who was serving at the local church with the holy mass, as the lighter of a church votive candles, as, according to Polish religious tradition, this was a honorable mention given by church to any local inhabitant.

Source: Best Polish etymologist Prof. Kazimierz Rymut's work "Nazwiska Polakow, Slownik Historyczno-Etymologiczny", [The Surnames of Poles, the Historical-Etymological Directory], Krakow, 1999-2001, and other Polish etymological works as "Slownik Najstarszych Nazwisk Polskich Pochodzenie Jezykowe" by Prof. Zofia Kowalik-Kaleta, Leonarda Dacewicz, and Beata Raszewska-Zurek, "Historia Nazwisk Polskich" by Zofia Kowalik-Kaleta", "The Surname as a Cultural Value and an Ethnic Heritage" by Zofia Kaleta, "Slownik Gwar Polskich" by Jan Karlowicz, "Herbarz Polski" by Adam Boniecki and Artur Reiski, Franciszek Czaykowski „Regestr Diesezjow czyli wlasciciele ziemscy w Koronie 1783 – 1784” z przypisami i wstepem Krzysztofa Chlapowskiego i Slawomira Gorzyckiego, and other etymological and historical works.

2. THE ORIGIN HOME & PARISH/CHURCH and CEMETERY

Grandmother Ludwika Ogarek's beloved birthplace and childhood home, and his family's ancestral home, was the town of Bienkowka [bjɛɲˈkufka] located in the southern part of Poland, with rich historical and religious roots and heritage. From this historical source, from abt 1880-1901, we have the following historical description of the family origin/home from the 19th century, and earlier:

Bienkowka [in all original sources fully spelled in Polish as Bieńkówka, n and o with Polish grammar diacritical mark over the letter]:
# The village, pow. (powiat-administrative county) myslenicki (means of the local town of Myslenice), gmina (community) Budzow. The Bienkowka is for the first time noted in Poland in 1366 with document signed by Polish King Kazimierz Wielki. In about 1456, Bienkowka contained approximately 117 inhabitants, in about 1880, Bienkowka contained approximately 259 homes, and 1469 inhabitants, of which one of these homes and inhabitants were very probably your family Ogarek. The Roman Catholic parish and church was located on-place, errected in 1793, separated then from the parish Sulkowice. The one class primary school was located there. All the village Bienkowka was geographically located at the main local road Makow - Zywiec.
# The place Bienkowka was noted in Poland under the following names (as would be important in any further family roots and genealogical search): Byenkowka (in year 1443), Byenkowka (1519), Byenkowa (1522), Byenykowka (1529), Bienkowka, Bienkowska (1564), Bienkowka (1581), Binkowka, Binkuwka (1779-82), Bieńkówka (1880), Bieńkówka (1964) - all derived from the name Bieniek, and/or from the name Benedykt - this from Latin language and name Benedictus.
# From the history of the village and parish Bienkowka we can note in the 18th century and earlier this Bienkowka belonged to parish Sulkowice, although many inhabitants attended the church and Harbutowice. In the years 1844-45 the Bienkowka inhabitants met the typhus epidemium, when 145 Bienkowka inhabitants had died, two years later the Bienkowka met big starvation with starvation typhus epidemium, when 603 Bienkowka inhabitants had died, in the year 1873 the village met the very serious cholera epidemium, and then the special part of the Bienkowka cemetery was founded, and named "Cholerny".

Source: "Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego...." [The Geographical Directory of the Kingdom of Poland ...], Krakow, Bienko Warszawa, 1880-1902, "Nazwy Miejscowe Polski Historia Pochodzenie Zmiany" [The Names of the Local Places in Poland History Origin Changes" by Prof. K. Rymut team, Krakow 1996-2007, and other historical and geographical works.

Part 7. ThE SURNAME LOCATION IN THE PRESENT-DAY POLAND

From Prof. K. Rymut's works, I can give you the surname location in present-day Poland:
7.1. Based on the Polish census 1990:
281 adults in Poland surnamed Ogarek.
The largest numbers, lived in the county of in the southern part of Poland.
7.2. Based on the Polish census 2002:
385 adults in Poland surnamed Ogarek,
The largest numbers, lived in the county of the southern part of Poland.
7.3. Based on the old Polish yellow and white pages on CDs, here is the surname location in the local area in the present-day Poland:
In this village Bienkowka: one family Ogarek
In the nearly located villages/local towns are living the following families surnamed Ogarek:
# In West - in the village of Budzow (as gmina): 1 family surnamed Ogarek
# In West - in the town of Sucha Beskidzka: 3 families surnamed Ogarek
# In West - in the village of Zembrzyce: 1 family surnamed Ogarek
# In North - in the town of Kalwaria Zebrzydowska: 3 families surnamed Ogarek
# In East - in the town of Sulkowice: 1 family surnamed Ogarek
# in South - in the town of Jordanow: no families surnamed Ogarek
==
Finally, with Polish internet yellow pages I was ready to locate in your family Bienkowka:
Stanislaw Ogarek (the owner of the bulding company), and here is the full postal address:
Bienkowka 230
34-212 Bienkowka
Poland
-
And with the list of pupils of the primary school in this present-day Bienkowka I've noted:
1. Magdalena Ogarek
2. Kuba (Jakub) Ogarek
==
Source: Polish census 1990/Surname location and website www.herby.com.pl, Polish census 2002/Surname location and "Slownik nazwisk uzywanych w Polsce na poczatku XXI wieku" by Kazimierz Rymut available also in webpage http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/, old Polish white pages CDs, and other sources including Polish internet.
FINAL REMARKS

With a high possibility the close or distant relatives of your Gma Ludwika Ogarek are still living in this Bienkowka, and/or in the local area of the present-day Poland. As with other sources I see the church/civil records from the 19th century from this Bienkowka are not accesible in Polish state archives, and in the U.S. with FHL/LDS microfilms, you are kindly pleased to post the family letter to Mr. Stanislaw Ogarek and his family living in this Bienkowka, asking any family memory, relation, and help with contacting local parish and cemetery, checking the records (if survived on-site) and graves from the 19th century, with the family name Ogarek.

With the best regards,
Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw, Poland
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jbudz922



Joined: 14 Aug 2010
Replies: 6

PostPosted: Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tad

Thank you for the information. Especially, the history of Bienkowka and for Stanislaw's address. I guess a visit to the church is the only way to get the records.

Jack
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TadWysocki



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom,
As promised I want to start my work with your query, the first would be your Ciesielski's from Poland. You gave your family Ciesielski origin as Olesnica. The first problem is they are at least 8 Olesnica in Poland, and half of them were located in the eastern part of Poland, in the 19th century under Russia rules ["My dad told the story of how my grandfather spoke fluent Russian"]. Do you know which Olesnica would be the right now? Maybe you know the county, nearest town, other place? If not, I will try to check few databases in Poland, crossing the surname location, and some historical and census sources. Maybe I will check EI database with Ciesielski's, sometimes immigration ship manifest states the other place in Poland/Russia. I will also check Geneteka, Pradziad, and other genealogical sources. But if your know more about your family Olesnica, this woulf help in my weekend, and rest nights search, thank you for any more info!
Have a nice all this weekend in the U.S., Tad from sunny but cold Warsaw
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TC



Joined: 31 Aug 2013
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Location: California

PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:17 pm    Post subject: Ciesielski/Labacz relatives Reply with quote

TadWysocki wrote:
Tom,
As promised I want to start my work with your query, the first would be your Ciesielski's from Poland. You gave your family Ciesielski origin as Olesnica. The first problem is they are at least 8 Olesnica in Poland, and half of them were located in the eastern part of Poland, in the 19th century under Russia rules ["My dad told the story of how my grandfather spoke fluent Russian"]. Do you know which Olesnica would be the right now? Maybe you know the county, nearest town, other place? If not, I will try to check few databases in Poland, crossing the surname location, and some historical and census sources. Maybe I will check EI database with Ciesielski's, sometimes immigration ship manifest states the other place in Poland/Russia. I will also check Geneteka, Pradziad, and other genealogical sources. But if your know more about your family Olesnica, this woulf help in my weekend, and rest nights search, thank you for any more info!
Have a nice all this weekend in the U.S., Tad from sunny but cold Warsaw


Tad,
Thanks for the reply. I believe my grandfather Tomasz Ciesielski was from Olesnica in the Swietokrzyskie province. I have checked Geneteka and there is a Tomasz born in 1884 from this province, but there is no detailed information as to his parents. I feel this is the right province since other family friends/cousins names I am familiar with (Glowniak, Lalewicz, Smolarski) also appear common in this area. I have found Tomasz's ship manifest, coming to the US in 1907. It shows his nationality and country as Russian, Olesnica but his race as Polish. It also shows his destination as Cleveland, Oh to stay with his brother Jan Ciesielski. I am a bit confused however in that it shows his relative in Poland/Russia was his mother Maryca Ciesielski - I understood my great grandmother's name to be Katarzyna? Also, Jan may have been Tomasz's younger brother, born in 1887 (this name also appears in Geneteka). Per immigration records, he came to the US in 1906. Again, his immigration records show only Russia, Olesnica - no province info.
Hopefully this helps, please do not go through too much effort. I would not want to spoil a sunny weekend for you! PS it is a sunny and quite warm autumn day in CA.
Tom
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