Cybulski

 
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Zenon
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 9:30 am    Post subject: Cybulski Reply with quote

James asked me to explain his surname Cybulski

Cybulski is from Polish cebula or cybula (in old language) "onion" with -ski ending. But this is what you already know Smile. I am writing it because maybe other Cybulskis (or correctly in Polish plural form Cybulscy) will be interested.

But did you know that according to old book Spis Szlachty Polskiej (Register of Polish Nobility) published in 1887 in Lwow there are two Cybulski families listed?

One of the coat of arms is Łada and they lived in Pilzno region.

The second coat of arms is Prawdzic and they lived in Mazowieckie region (area of Warsaw). The Prawdzic herb you will find here http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prawdzic


Last edited by Zenon on Sat Feb 02, 2008 2:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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James
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

no msg

Last edited by James on Wed Nov 05, 2008 12:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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NancyM
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:34 am    Post subject: Re: Cybulski Reply with quote

Zenon wrote:
But did you know that according to old book Spis Szlachty Polskiej (Register of Polish Nobility) published in 1887 in Lwow there are two Cybulski families listed?

One of the coat of arms is Łada and they lived in Pilzno region.

The second coat of arms is Prawdzic and they lived in Mazowieckie region (area of Warsaw). The Prawdzic herb you will find here http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prawdzic


The whole notion of nobility and "coat of arms" is so foreign to me that I cannot understand how Cybulski is related to Łada and Prawdzic.

I am more familiar with names like Zajac = hare (another word for rabbit). And I was very surprised to learn how to pronounce that name in Polish - the American pronunciation is like "say-jack" and the Polish is more like "sigh -unce"
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Zenon
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 2:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Cybulski Reply with quote

NancyM wrote:
The whole notion of nobility and "coat of arms" is so foreign to me that I cannot understand how Cybulski is related to Łada and Prawdzic.


I moved reply to a new topic Heraldry and Coats of Arms here http://forum.polishorigins.com/viewtopic.php?t=64
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Zenon
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Cybulski Reply with quote

NancyM wrote:
I am more familiar with names like Zajac = hare (another word for rabbit). And I was very surprised to learn how to pronounce that name in Polish - the American pronunciation is like "say-jack" and the Polish is more like "sigh -unce"


Well, when I for the first time heard Zajac pronounced by an American I did not know what we are talking about Laughing . Listen here: http://polishorigins.com/public/audio/zajac.mp3 how we spell Zając.

And here: http://polishorigins.com/public/audio/cybulski.mp3 you can listen to Polish version of Cybulski Very Happy
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James
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 9:16 pm    Post subject: polish pronunciations Reply with quote

About 15 years ago , I meet a man from Poland, and he asked me my name, and when I said my name, he laughed and said that I was saying my name incorrectly. I said that I have said my name for 40 yrs., and that since it is my name, I think I should know how to say it. I pronunced my name like this; "sigh-bull-ski", with the accent on the "sigh". He said my name as you would in Poland, and I was rather suprised at the difference. Most of my friends in New Jersey say "sa-bull-ski". I don't try to correct them anymore. At least they try. Here in West Virginia, where names are mostly English, Irish, German, they don't even try, but just say James, and pass over the Cybulski part. Not a large ethnic community in W.V. Very Happy
I still laugh at the first time with Zenon, as he drove my brother and I to Wloclawek(, which in itself is a mouth full,) we were driving thru Plock, and I said "Oh , we are in Plock." I said it as an American would."p-lock"( like lock) Zenon looked at me funny and said" what? ". I repeated the name, and he laughed and said the name as it is spoken in Polish" p-wots-k". He said it the American way a few times and laughed again. The rest of my stay in Poland, I kept reminding myself that I'm not in the US, and I tried to use proper Polish pronunciation. I still say alot of Polish words with the Polish pronunciation, even though I'm home, and don't have to, but I find it helps me as I try to learn more of the language.
So, thanks for the reminder how to really say my name. Very Happy
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NancyM
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 10:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Cybulski Reply with quote

Zenon wrote:
Well, when I for the first time heard Zajac pronounced by an American


ha ha, that was me!
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Zenon
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 2:32 pm    Post subject: Re: Cybulski Reply with quote

NancyM wrote:
Zenon wrote:
Well, when I for the first time heard Zajac pronounced by an American


ha ha, that was me!


Yeah, that was you Nancy Very Happy . If I tried to write in Polish how you pronounced Zajac it would look like: Zajdżak Wink
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mcebula



Joined: 18 Jan 2013
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My family surname is Cebula so this is interesting thanks. Are the 2 names Cebula and Cybulski related in some way back in history? Is Cebula a just shortened version of Cybulski or is it considered a completely different surname?
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dnowicki
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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike,
Linguistically the surname Cebula (Cybula) is treated as a noun and Cebulkski (Cybulski) is treated as an adjective. Both have the same "onion" meaning and are related only insofar as they both share a common meaning. Since an onion is something very common a rather large number of individuals/families have surnames with that meaning but are probably not related in any other way. Surnames ending in both ski and cki are used as adjectives. Ski generally follows consonants (although not always) and cki follows vowels.
How an individual or family came to use a particular surname can be fascinating and sometimes the origin of a surname falls into a generalized category. Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings by William F. Hoffman and published by the Polish Genealogical Society of America in Chicago is a good general guide to the meanings of surnames. However, generalizations must admit of many exceptions. Two examples of exceptions are found among my ancestors. My maternal great grandmother's maiden name was Kajetaniak and Hoffman explains the surname as being derived from the Latin Caietanus "of the town of Caieta." However, for my great grandmother the surname has a much more simple origin. Her great grandfather who was born in 1756 had the first name Kajetan. During his lifetime he was referred to as Kajetan Stelmach. Stelmach cart wright/carriage builder simply described his occupation. A few years after his death in 1804 his widow and children began to use the surname Kajetaniak which clearly referred to their relationship to Kajetan but they could just as easily have adopted as surname like Stelmaszek or another variant describing the occupation. Another example is my mother's maiden name, Plawinski. Hoffman explains the general origin of that surname as being derived from the verb plawic sie meaning to bathe or float. However, I believe there is a simpler explanation of the surname. In the late 1700s my ancestors in that line resided in the village of Plawin so it seems to me that the surname originated not from a fondness for bathing but simply as a link to the village where they resided.
Dave
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