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Mary Pate



Joined: 01 Nov 2008
Replies: 59
Location: Overland Park, KS

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Post Posted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:24 pm      Post subject: Recipe for Miesianina (phonetically as I remember)
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Does anyone have a recipe for Miesianina (phonetically spelled as I remember calling it)? My grandma fixed it at Easter time. Recipe consisted mostly of beets, chopped up, with horseradish in it and ham or kielbasa stirred onto it as I remember it. Appreciate any input.
Mary Smile
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Elzbieta Porteneuve
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Joined: 09 Nov 2012
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Post Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 2:43 pm      Post subject: Re: Recipe for Miesianina (phonetically as I remember)
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Mary Pate wrote:
Does anyone have a recipe for Miesianina (phonetically spelled as I remember calling it)? My grandma fixed it at Easter time. Recipe consisted mostly of beets, chopped up, with horseradish in it and ham or kielbasa stirred onto it as I remember it. Appreciate any input.
Mary Smile



Mary,

Concerning the word "Miesianina" it is either your grandma's name, or, maybe "Mieszanina", hodgepodge, mixture.

Chopped up cooked red beets it is buraczki, or buraczki ćwikłowe (type of beets, good for being grated).
Horseradish is chrzan (also grated).

Google is your friend with "buraczki i chrzan", here one example.
https://www.winiary.pl/przepis.aspx/86330/cwikla-z-chrzanem (in Polish), how to make beets and chrzan:
* beets
"Buraki umyć, zalać wrzącą wodą i ugotować do miękkości. // wash beets, put into pan, cover with hot water, and cook until they are soft. That is perfect old Polish grandma, the cooking time is never given.
"Ugotowane i obrane buraki zetrzeć na tarce o drobnych otworach." // peel beets, then grate them. There are zillon of useless fancy graters, the best one is an old one:
http://i2.cdscdn.com/pdt2/0/0/5/1/700x700/deb3011244899005/rw/rape-manuelle-a-4-faces.jpg
* horseradish
"Chrzan umyć, oskrobać, opłukać, zetrzeć na tarce, doprawić solą i kwaskiem." // wash horseradish, scrape (peel), rinse, grate, season with salt and sourness.
My own, after my Mom: once horseradish is grated, put in into a pan, cover with hot water and cook less than one minute (the French word for that is ébouillanter, short time in boiling water), remove water, season with salt and lemon juice. Add one spoon of sour cream. It must be strong like a strong French Dijon mustard, but not killing-strong.

Depending on grandma's receipe:
* you serve it in two separate plates, red one, and white one, with any meat you like: kielbasa or ham is excellent idea
* you mix up (with a fork) red and white, and serve it in one plate, with any meat as above
I am not sure if your grandma was mixing up everything, red, white, kielbasa and ham, or just second line above

Best,
Elzbieta
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 3:53 pm      Post subject:
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Mary,

If you follow the directions Elzbieta posted and grate your own horseradish, be sure to do the grating in a well ventilated area---preferably outside---it will help avoid watering eyes. Also, the addition of beets and beet juice to pure horseradish makes it less "strong." When I was young, it was always one of my maternal grandfather's tasks to grate the horseradish root at Christmas and Easter and also at any other time that my grandmother wanted more horseradish. He used to do the grating in the stairway to the basement with the inner door closed and the outer door open for ventilation. It was always easy to know when he started and finished grating by when he started and finished singing. I guess the singing of Polish songs helped to take his mind off the strength of the horseradish vapors.

Good with the DIY horseradish grating.

Dave
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Mary Pate



Joined: 01 Nov 2008
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Location: Overland Park, KS

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Post Posted: Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:42 am      Post subject:
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Thank you both for the info. Remember my grandma using sour cream a lot, like with cucumbers. Other stuff remember was pickled pig's feet which I stayed away from. That gel was enough, even not thinking of the pigs feet.
Mary
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joannes



Joined: 27 Jun 2011
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Post Posted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 3:43 pm      Post subject:
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I have always wondered about my family's Easter dish. My mother was polish-born while my father's parents were from South Poland but Dad was a 1st generation child born in the USA, however, from a Slovak limeage.
The dish was called "Chun" (phonetically). It consisted of chopped ham, kielbasa and eggs with a buttermilk sauce. The buttermilk had horseradish added and left to steep two days after the combining. Dad would chase everyone out of the house on Good Friday while he grated the horseradish roots and mixed them with salt and vinegar before mixing with the buttermilk.
Most of my sibling, including me, felt the dish was "gross", However, one brother and I came to accept and appreciate the dish along with a brother-in-law (a true Irishman). I still prepare the dish every Easter and a day or two afterwards, the only one to continue the Tradition.

JimS
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Elzbieta Porteneuve
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Post Posted: Tue Oct 20, 2015 6:19 pm      Post subject:
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joannes wrote:
I have always wondered about my family's Easter dish. My mother was polish-born while my father's parents were from South Poland but Dad was a 1st generation child born in the USA, however, from a Slovak limeage.
The dish was called "Chun" (phonetically). It consisted of chopped ham, kielbasa and eggs with a buttermilk sauce. The buttermilk had horseradish added and left to steep two days after the combining. Dad would chase everyone out of the house on Good Friday while he grated the horseradish roots and mixed them with salt and vinegar before mixing with the buttermilk.
Most of my sibling, including me, felt the dish was "gross", However, one brother and I came to accept and appreciate the dish along with a brother-in-law (a true Irishman). I still prepare the dish every Easter and a day or two afterwards, the only one to continue the Tradition.

JimS
Very Happy [/b]


>>> The dish was called "Chun" (phonetically).
That name "chun" could be Polish "chrzan", horseradish, the essence of this dish.

Thanks for sharing!

Best,
Elzbieta
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