PolishOrigins Forum

 FAQFAQ    SearchSearch    MemberlistMemberlist    ProfileProfile    Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages    Log inLog in    RegisterRegister 
Author
Message
rsowa
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 09 Nov 2013
Replies: 177
Location: Dundee, Michigan, USA

Back to top
Post Posted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:19 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Ute...thanks so much for that link. I try hard to share what I learn with my siblings and my own children. In most cases they don't show much interest. But that is fine...one day one of them will pick up the family story and run with it, taking up where I left off. I just pray that I gave them a head start.

One tidbit (that makes a good story a century later), but was nonetheless painful and hard for folks at the time to talk about. On my (non-Polish) side of the family, were a series of murders and child abandonment cases that created a black hole in that generation's willingness to share any family stories. While my mother did a lot of digging, and managed to write several books on her ancestors, that period was impossible for her to investigate without opening a lot of old and painful memories for those involved. I am not saying that our ancestors reluctance to talk about their past was similar, but it shouldn't be ruled out.

In researching my wife's family history, we have discovered that some of those in Hungary (only a few miles from Galicia) were apparently "royalty". One of her "family story" says that one of her ancestors supposedly used a verbal put-down regularly to another of her ancestors. She'd say things like "you are supposed to be royalty, you ought to be doing better for yourself". It's those sort of anecdotes that make me think that a lot of the ancestry discussions didn't happen because reasons like that.

But years later, it gives us a much better appreciation for the trials and tribulations our ancestors went through, and makes for a much better (and more realistic) story to share with our posterity.
View user's profile
Send private message
Ute
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 13 Dec 2009
Replies: 593
Location: Germany

Back to top
Post Posted: Wed Oct 07, 2015 2:44 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

rsowa wrote:

Richard,
Thank you so much for your interesting response. In case you haven't seen it yet and are interested in reading more about the research conducted on this subject, here is the link:
http://publichistorycommons.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/The-power-of-family-history-in-adolescent-identity.pdf

So far neither one in my family is interested in family research as well, but just like you, I hope that one day one of them will continue the research I'm doing, like I continued the research my uncle started some decades ago on the German side of our family. I remember how disappointed he was when he tried to get me interested in it as well and I showed no interest in it at all. My uncle passed away in 1999 -- wish he could see our family tree now and how much I found out on our ancestors. Oh well ...
View user's profile
Send private message
singingfalls
PolishOrigins Patron


Joined: 21 Dec 2014
Replies: 97
Location: Oregon

Back to top
Post Posted: Wed Oct 07, 2015 2:20 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

I mentioned this in an earlier post and it deserves repeating. All of the information I have gathered is digitized and stored on multiple media types. I do not use cloud storage services but I have three external hard drives, three internal hard drives and DVD and CD backups of everything. At some point I will create a printable digital book that I will convert into a hard copy of everything I gather on my family. Someone in the family some time in the future will want to know and I hope to spare them the agony and expense I have gone through. Besides, I have no children and it is a way for the name of my mother and father to be carried on by me for my siblings.
_________________
Kyć - Adamówka
Wlaź - Lucków Górny
Petraszczuk - Khrabuzna, Ukraine
View user's profile
Send private message
Send e-mail
Visit poster's website
dgawell



Joined: 01 Jun 2014
Replies: 63

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Oct 09, 2015 7:13 am      Post subject: publishing
Reply with quote

Does anyone have a good suggestion on how to publish the family history stories. I imagine none of us are seeking to be famous authors and just want the family history and all of our hard research to be documented in a readable format. I have three very different family backgrounds: Swedish, Polish and "Back to the Pilgrims" in MA, so that means three different books. I'm still rewriting/editing my historical novel of my 9th great grandmother but want to start on some of the other work because the process of rewriting is PAINFUL and I need to start another project. The info in my head is going to explode if I don't...
View user's profile
Send private message
singingfalls
PolishOrigins Patron


Joined: 21 Dec 2014
Replies: 97
Location: Oregon

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Oct 09, 2015 8:54 am      Post subject: Re: publishing
Reply with quote

dgawell wrote:
Does anyone have a good suggestion on how to publish the family history stories.


https://www.lulu.com/

I googled self-publishing and was flooded with options. https://janefriedman.com/self-publish-your-book/

Hope that helps.

_________________
Kyć - Adamówka
Wlaź - Lucków Górny
Petraszczuk - Khrabuzna, Ukraine
View user's profile
Send private message
Send e-mail
Visit poster's website
PolishLibrarian
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Aug 2010
Replies: 307

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Oct 09, 2015 3:33 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

dgawell~ My Polish paternal grandparents each arrived in 1909, met and married in 1912, then both died in the mid-1920s. Ten years ago, basically knowing only their names, I started researching our two Polish family surnames. Each had 2 siblings who also came to the U.S and then married here. I searched for info on my grandparents, their siblings and the children they all produced in the U.S (all of the first generation born here have passed away). In 2009 I visited Poland and found more info about the siblings left behind, ancestors names, descendants, etc.

I realized that no one in the future would probably want to wade through my notes, documents, copies, etc. (digital & paper), so I decided to put everything together in a book format. That way the ancestral info. would be presented in one place, and any descendant on any of the family lines could start at that point and move their family tree forward to the current generations.

It took me 1 ½ years to put all this material together, transcribing all of the documentation I found, as well as including pictures of these 2 generations generously shared by new 2nd cousins I have met on this journey and any “stories” shared with me. This summer I worked with a local digital printing company (in a small town of 44,000), providing them with PDF files of the MS Word document text, MS Publisher cover, etc. They advised me on paper weights and some format details, and then printed the book (color photos on cover, B&W photos in the book itself), assembled and bound it (no graphic design services were needed). Since the book was 194 pages, I had them put a coil binding on it so that the pages lay flat when the book is open. For 50 copies, the cost was approximately $14 per copy which I felt was a very reasonable price.

That's probably more than you wanted to know, but sometimes it's easier to understand the outcome when you know what went into the decisions resulting in the outcome. Good luck. ~PL
View user's profile
Send private message
rsowa
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 09 Nov 2013
Replies: 177
Location: Dundee, Michigan, USA

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Oct 10, 2015 7:50 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

dgawell...I feel your pain. First, you mentioned "readable format" which has several conntations. Obviously it should be something that is accessible by a wide range of readers. PL and others gave some good suggestions. My approach (so far) has been to send out flash drives with everything I have, to everyone in the family. Feedback from them in the last couple years is mixed.

And then, of course, it should be worth reading. My agony centers around that part. Genealogy can be awfully dry reading. So I have tried to add anecdotes and family stories to the facts and documents. When my mother wrote her books on her side of the family, a reader once wrote her a letter saying "I loved the way you interspersed history of the period with the goings-on of relatives." In all candor, I think THAT is what I am striving for, something that folks will actually read. What most folks tend to overlook, are all those stories and events at the time that shaped our ancestors decisions and activities. For example, American men becoming adults in the late 1960s dealt with the war in Vietnam, and issues around being drafted into the Army. Several generations from now, folks will probably really be interested in how those events shaped OUR decisions.

Then, I have been trying to split up the family into family group "chapters" that make the whole thing easier to deal with. For example, if someone actually wants to study or research someone, they can zero in pretty quickly to their specific family, and not get lost in hundreds of other "shirt tail relations".

Finally, the whole concept of re-writing is also painful and prone to error. I have done it a dozen times or more, just to come up with the final layout of my "book". But now I am at the point where when I discover a new fact, I really only need to revise one or two chapters. Nonetheless, after working on my wife's family history, and listening to her feedback, I have (again) decided to revise my own family history book format and layout to be a bit different. Bottom line, find a third party to read what you have written and give you and honest critique of it all.

Whew...why does this feel like work? Did I retire from one job, only to start another...LOL
View user's profile
Send private message
Elzbieta Porteneuve
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 09 Nov 2012
Replies: 3098
Location: Paris, France

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 1:56 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

rsowa wrote:
What most folks tend to overlook, are all those stories and events at the time that shaped our ancestors decisions and activities.

For example, American men becoming adults in the late 1960s dealt with the war in Vietnam, and issues around being drafted into the Army. Several generations from now, folks will probably really be interested in how those events shaped OUR decisions.


Richard,

It is the first time here I see the Vietnam war mentioned, and it touches me deeply.

Polish captain leaving for the WWII in 1939, imprisoned by Russians (as thousands of Polish POWs), leaving Russian horror and tortures with Anders Army, on this turistic famous path we all know about: Kamchatka, Siberia, Persia, Palestine, Italy. Fighting as part of British Army. London. Then no more homeland after Yalta deal with Stalin and Russian communists, traveling with Polish wife, she also from Anders Army, as stateless to the US, pages of stateless Poles from Southampton to NY. Passed at the age of 51, leaving three young children, three boys. The younger tweens drafted for the war in Vietnam, and one of them imprisoned by Viets.

Fall of Saigon in 1975.

Polish fate.

Elzbieta
View user's profile
Send private message
singingfalls
PolishOrigins Patron


Joined: 21 Dec 2014
Replies: 97
Location: Oregon

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 11:50 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

I signed my volunteer army enlistment papers in '64 at the age of 16. My father had to sign for me. He didn't want to. I went to boot camp when I turned 17. Did 1 1/2 years on Okinawa and then brazenly volunteered for Viet Nam. By means of the internet, google earth and other digital tools, I've been able to collect pictures of machine gun bunkers I built and guard towers I pulled guard duty in. I most certainly will put the images and the stories in my genealogical records. We often only consider our ancestors and don't realize that we are part of a family continuum and we do a disservice by making it difficult for our descendents to learn of us.
One of the most priceless acquisitions I have of my Polish ancestors is a digital image of my great grandfather from Adamówka. It is a Soviet era document declaring him a wounded soldier (from a war I have yet to decipher) that allowed him to have a discount on public transportation. This is an important historical thread I have yet to track down. You can only imagine how thrilled I was to acquire this. I count it one of my greatest treasures. He looks very much like my younger brother. Because he lived, I live.
Not everyone will appreciate family history. For most of my life I didn't. Now I am consumed by it. Books like this are important. We are fortunate to be able to create them. Think of the centuries when everything was passed down my oral tradition.
I agree that it should be a literary work of art but if not, anything is better than nothing.

_________________
Kyć - Adamówka
Wlaź - Lucków Górny
Petraszczuk - Khrabuzna, Ukraine
View user's profile
Send private message
Send e-mail
Visit poster's website
Cheri Vanden Berg
PO Top Contributor & Patron


Joined: 16 Oct 2011
Replies: 497

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Oct 11, 2015 8:48 pm      Post subject: Re: publishing
Reply with quote

dgawell wrote:
Does anyone have a good suggestion on how to publish the family history stories. I imagine none of us are seeking to be famous authors and just want the family history and all of our hard research to be documented in a readable format. I have three very different family backgrounds: Swedish, Polish and "Back to the Pilgrims" in MA, so that means three different books. I'm still rewriting/editing my historical novel of my 9th great grandmother but want to start on some of the other work because the process of rewriting is PAINFUL and I need to start another project. The info in my head is going to explode if I don't...

I you are looking to have your research bound into one book for yourself (in your case three separate books), and have another copy placed in a genealogy library, the Allen County Library has this service for free. I read this on the website below:
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Allen_County_Public_Library
"One of the creative ways the Genealogy Center collection grows is through its Photocopy Exchange Program. Individuals submit a manuscript copy of a family or local history they have written and the Genealogy Center photocopies the document twice, placing one hardcover copy in the Center's collection and returning one hardcover copy and the original manuscript pages to the author."
View user's profile
Send private message
dgawell



Joined: 01 Jun 2014
Replies: 63

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 8:51 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Thanks to all for your replies and good suggestions. I received an email just this morning expressing great appreciation for the trees, stories and suggestions that were passed on just yesterday. I bit the bullet and called my eldest cousin. Her granddaughter had one of those big genealogy projects assigned and the work I had sent was overwhelming, in a good way. They are all excited to get together. Too bad the cousin with "the stuff" still is non communicative.

I'm in the midst of finishing up the historical novel of my Puritan 9th great grandmother and will continue to work on my Polish history and records research. I'm going to wait until AFTER my spring trip to my grandparents' village to add to their stories. I will start working on my Polish grandmother's historical novel after that big trip.

I think I now have the knack in making my writing pretty interesting. I need to spend more time in a genealogy library to look at other formats. I'v learned we have to add the history and sociology to the stories.

How nice to find others like yourselves who feel the call and burden to honor our ancestors and also our future families. Can you imagine that in the year 2200 someone might be giving thanks for that person(you and me) who took the time to collect information that would otherwise be gone forever? As I work on plugging in the ancestors on the big online family tree, I often feel there are long gone ancestors looking down from heaven as I work. I hear them say things like "Look, Sophia, that girl (I'm a "girl in their eyes) figured out our marriage date. How wonderful that someone is remembering me after all these years!"

Donna
View user's profile
Send private message
Ute
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 13 Dec 2009
Replies: 593
Location: Germany

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 11:58 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Just love this and thought I share it with you all!


12118801_10153060379641512_7102745135194224947_n.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  81.97 KB
 Viewed:  8513 Time(s)

12118801_10153060379641512_7102745135194224947_n.jpg


View user's profile
Send private message
Mary Pate



Joined: 01 Nov 2008
Replies: 59
Location: Overland Park, KS

Back to top
Post Posted: Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:38 am      Post subject: Life of our Grandparents in Poland
Reply with quote

Enjoyed reading posts of Ute and many others on this subject. I'd like o share my experience from my grandparents. From both sets, I knew what area they came from, one from the old Poznan Province (German nationals) and the other from eastern Galicia (Austrian nationals). Of help, also, was, I think, a Book of Saints, a large book. In the front of it, there were pages printed to include births, marriage, deaths. My paternal grandmother had filled info in on her origin, her children's birth and marriage dates and also deaths of her and her husband's parents and siblings. I don't have the book but have copied pages of this information which I really treasure. It has been a help in doing research in that area. On my maternal side, I wasn't lucky enough to have such a book but this grandmother lived with us. She talked about the "old country" (stary kraj). Corresponding with three sisters, she kept letters from them from which I gleaned information. She also talked some but, sad to say, as a small child, I never inquired for more stories and facts. Of interest is I remember that she couldn't wait after WWII to hear from them--that they were safe. Two were, the other she never heard from. After a lot of effort, I still cannot find her death info.
As to finding out more on my maternal side, some years ago, I was looking on the net in business yellow pages for villages, including one from where maternal grandmother came from. I saw a Zielinski listed that ran a gas station. This was my maternal grandfather's last name. The gas station owner evidently was not interested, maybe not related but he gave the letter back to the post office. A postal employee read the letter in which I named people I knew that lived in the area. That employee's father was a friend of my mother's first cousin. So, his son gave the letter to him, who, in turn, passed it on to my cousin. This cousin's daughter contacted me and from that, I have obtained several generations of my mother's line.
As to the paternal side, to my knowledge, there are none of my family line left where these grandparents came from. However, the LDS films have been a great source enabling to go back eight generations on that side as well as my maternal side. So, my point is that there is a way to delve back into the past. However, it might not be from a personal conversation from your parents or grandparents.
View user's profile
Send private message
[email protected]



Joined: 15 Apr 2015
Replies: 3

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Oct 31, 2015 12:12 pm      Post subject: Why didn't they talk about it?
Reply with quote

An email came from the Polish Origins group with the subject line “Why didn’t they talk about it.” Like many others, my Polish immigrant grandfather didn’t talk about the old country. Why didn’t Grandpa tell me stories about Poland?

Andrew never talked about his past. When I was a teen, I dragged out enough to know that his father had three wives and twenty children. Andrew was the youngest. I believe he never met some of his siblings–they would have been adults when he was born. He didn’t know all of their names. He didn’t know the names of the first two wives. Supposedly, he came to America because there wasn’t much left for the youngest of twenty children to keep him at home.

Andrew left Biskupiec when he was sixteen. Although he gambled away most of his money on the boat, he fooled the immigration inspector at Ellis Island into thinking he still had the required funds to enter America. He went (I think) to Connecticut to a brother-cousin-some sort of relative. Then he went to Chicago to another brother-cousin-though not a more distant relative, though he might have also been in Toledo or Buffalo. Later he wandered to Detroit, where he had at least a couple of sisters, though he only ever mentioned one. Genealogy sleuthing, I get the idea that up to half of his nineteen siblings left Poland for America. Andrew was close to one cousin and one other relative, but close means occasional meetings, not holidays together. As he got older, he pushed them away.

Off the boat, there was a succession of jobs in a bewildering variety of occupations, learning English, learning to be American. That was what I remember most about Grandpa. He was unrelentingly American and relentlessly ambitious, but not a money grubber.

Why didn’t Andrew talk about his youth, his family, his home? His beloved granddaughter–me–with my endless curiosity, couldn’t worm anything out of him. I thought it was because he put such effort into being American that there wasn’t room for his past. I thought he didn’t feel the silken ties that bind me to my mother and grandmothers.

Pictures show that his family in Poland lived off dirt roads and their houses were nowhere near as nice as Andrew’s in America. Still, they were not dirt poor. Back in Biskupiec, he lost a couple of cousins (one an accountant, the other a dentist) in the Katyn massacre when Stalin was getting rid of the intelligent people in Poland. An uncle was in the Austrian army during the Balkan War. A quarter of the population of Tarnow, where Andrew’s grandparents lived, were Jews killed by Hitler. A step-brother might have been active in the resistance, becoming something of a local folk hero.

When I had a boyfriend with a Germanic surname, my mother warned me never to tell Grandpa that name. Andrew hated Russians and Germans. No if, ands, buts, or exceptions.

I wish I had asked him why he didn’t talk about it. If he had answered (a big if) I think I would have found that his hatred of Poland’s enemies told the story. But I don’t KNOW.
View user's profile
Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PolishOrigins Forum Index -> Emigration All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2 Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB ©

© 2009-2022 COPYRIGHTS BY THE OWNER OF POLISHORIGINS.COM