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Kolz



Joined: 20 Jul 2016
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Post Posted: Wed Jul 20, 2016 4:16 pm      Post subject: Where in Poland did my ancestor come from?
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His name was Johan Friedrich Kollovkowsky (the surname might be a little bit different) and was born year 1715 in Poland, and died 1765 in Sweden. Is there any way to figure out where in Poland he was from?
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sirdan
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Post Posted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 5:00 pm      Post subject:
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By the malformed name only? Thats almost impossible. Do you have any other specific info, that could help localize his born place?
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Kolz



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Post Posted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 8:39 pm      Post subject:
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sirdan wrote:
By the malformed name only? Thats almost impossible. Do you have any other specific info, that could help localize his born place?


Thanks for replying. No, that's sadly all I have Sad When in Sweden, he married Anna Christina Schreiber, and the name of their daughter was Anna Lovisa "Kollovkowsky". Johann worked as a farrier.

Since his first and middle name was German, do you think he was from Pomerania, or why is that the case?
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sirdan
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Post Posted: Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:13 am      Post subject:
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Yea, german names may suggest different ethnicity than polish. I had thought they would be lutheran germans, but this polish sound of Kollovkowsky surname does not match it somehow.
Original polish surname would be like: Kołakowski, Kołłakowski (rare), Kollonkowski, or similar.
Start looking in north Poland would be logical.

Just side note: the most people with Kołakowski surname are in przasnysz district, mazowieckie voivodeship, name derives from Kołaki Wielkie village.
Kołłakowski looks like nonexistent today. But still, i found newspaper from 1928 "Słowo Pomorskie" with article about births. One of baby was Kołłakowski. I believe this announcement refers to births in Toruń or Grudziądz. Both in Kujawsko-Pomorskie voivodeship. Kołłakowski may be old form of Kołakowski. That are just some hints.
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sirdan
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Post Posted: Fri Jul 22, 2016 5:46 pm      Post subject:
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I once again took a try on this surname. I found interesting rule that Kollakowski surname (without polish diacritics) i frequently combined with german names in google searches.
At moikrewni.pl site, there are at least 8 Kollakowski's - most of them in Toruń. They appear in Toruń adress book in 1923 and 1936.
Im afraid that we would not find may resources from 1715 y anyway.
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Kolz



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Post Posted: Sat Jul 23, 2016 11:05 am      Post subject:
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Thank you so much for looking into this and giving it your time and effort. I have heard that it wasn't too uncommon with German first and middle names for ethnic Polish people, since the Germans were in charge of some Polish areas. I find the information you put forth very interesting. But sadly, as you say, it seems unlikely that we will be able to find something that far back in time. One day, maybe I will somehow discover some new information about him that will give us new leads.
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sirdan
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Post Posted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 4:25 pm      Post subject:
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HI once again. Sorry to splitting thread but i ommited another important fact.

You may take more carefully to the topic, then there would be more chance to find your ancestor. Firstly, your ancestor had specialized job. Now, In such old times, it would be very very hard to do such craft alone. Usually, all craftmen were gathered in features crafts associations. There are list of members of features crafts floating around many archives, including Toruń. So, if you can put estimated date when Johan came to Sweden, then we could find out if he learned his craft in Poland or Sweden. If he came late in his years, then there is chance he learned his craft in Poland, thus he might be in on the various craftmen list or historical books.
In the village, ussually ferrier job was done by smith. So being ferrier suggest Johan could come from a town or city.
Another remark. You mentioned he come from Poland. How reliable is that info? This is another place where carefullnes is advised. At XVIII century, north Poland was actually Prusy Królewskie. So the naming is important. Toruń was in Prusy Królewskie, but Bydgoszcz was in Polish Kingdom. Prusy Królewskie was actually dependant province of Polish Kingdom, but at that time it couldnt be named just "Poland", i believe.
And finally the name, I dont insist that Johan's surname is Kołakowski/Kołłakowski, but there were also some Kołakowski's in Bydgoszcz. Check out for smiths and smith craftmen associations in towns.
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Kolz



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Post Posted: Tue Jul 26, 2016 9:49 pm      Post subject:
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I just spend some 30 minutes googling and I couldn't find anything too exciting, but maybe this will give us new leads. Johann had his first child with Anna in 1745, so for all we know he could have been in Sweden for a long time. I can't say. Anna's father (Jacob Schreiber) was also a farrier so that could be a possible reason to why they met. Apparently, Jacob lived at Brohuset, Hovslagarboställe (farrier homestead), Riseberga parish. Do you think that indicates that Johann already knew the profession, and consciously went to a place where other farriers would be located? I think it makes sense. Furthermore, I found conflicting information on some sites, most said that Johann was born in Poland, but some had Germany listed. Perhaps it could be explain with that Germany at the time, owned current day Polish territories, and that would in turn indicate that Johann was from western Poland, or what do you think?
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