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Rich Gibson



Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Replies: 6

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 6:05 pm      Post subject: What about golumpkis?
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Sorry I can't get this computer to type that character. Maybe I missed it here but both my busia and my wife's mother would make this. Carolyn fortunately got the recipe before her mom passed and we enjoy them several times a year. It takes two huge cabbage heads and mounds of beef, veal and pork but its' worth the effort. My boys and their families fight over it whenever Carolyn makes it. Great fare, especially when it's cold outside!
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jozefs
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Joined: 05 Sep 2010
Replies: 173
Location: Włocławek

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 6:46 pm      Post subject: Golabki...
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Stuffed cabbage-step
It would seem that this is a complicated and arduous process ...
and so actually it's best to eat them.
Made by my grandma and mom are great right?
And with them goes so fast, and we do not want to stand by gołąbkach do not know how long, except that you probably do not throw a culinary novice when trying to wrap the stuffing in the cabbage and then he could;)
But there is no reason for nerves and fear.
When we know exactly, step by step the secrets of preparing these delicacies, they'll laugh at the time of how clumsily we all went for the first time:) Personally, I like the most ordinary rice-meat-stuffed cabbage in tomato sauce ...
Be baked! and such, and just today I propose to you...

http://kuchnia-monsai.blogspot.com/2009/05/goabki-krok-po-kroku.html

This is it?

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jozef
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All Polska



Joined: 05 Jul 2010
Replies: 48
Location: Florida, USA

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Post Posted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 11:11 am      Post subject:
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I couldn't read a thing, but the photos looked good. Any one interested in the way my family made them in English, let me know. All Polska
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jozefs
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Post Posted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 5:22 am      Post subject:
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All Polska wrote:
I couldn't read

Try translate.google or other - for example

Proporcje, które podam za chwilę, wystarczą na ok. 45 średniej wielkości gołąbków.
Wszystko oczywiście zależy od tego jaką kapustę dostaniemy, a ta zazwyczaj jedna drugiej nie równa.
Nie raz bywało, że zostało mi farszu, ale to nic. Można go szczelnie zamknąć i jeśli nie chce się nam biec po kolejną główkę kapusty w danej chwili, to spokojnie można przechować go i zrobić na drugi dzień.
A gdy dzieje się odwrotnie, gdy kapusty zostanie nam więcej niż farszu, możemy ją przeznaczyć na surówkę, zasmażaną kapustkę lub zupę Smile
Nic tutaj się w każdym bądź razie nie marnuje, łącznie z głąbem... Wink , który jest zdrowy i bardzo dobry na surowo Smile

Proportions to give a moment, enough for about 45 medium-sized pigeons.
All of course depends on the sprouts get a second one is usually not equal.
Not once at times that I have been stuffing, but it's nothing. It can be tightly closed and if we do not want to run for another head of cabbage at a time, you can safely store it and do the other day.
And when the opposite happens when the sprouts are stuffing us more than we can spend it on salad, fried cabbage and soup:)
Nothing here is in any case is not wasted, including the depths ... Wink, Which is healthy and very good raw:)

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Bill Rushin
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

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Post Posted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 2:43 pm      Post subject:
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Years ago I saved this info in my recipe notes:

Golbek (singular) and golabki (plural) are pronounced go-woom-bek and go-woom-ky respectively. They are commonly known as stuffed cabbages and are frequently misspelled as golomki, golumpki, galobki, and gowoomki. The Russian name for them is golubtsy while Slovaks and some Goral call them holubky.

Their Polish name stems from the word "golab" which means dove or pigeon. This has nothing to do with the ingredients but only with the shape.

It has been told that the Polish Army defeated the Teutonic knights near Malbork in the 15th Century because the soldiers of the Polish Army were fed copious amounts of hearty golabki. And an army travels on its stomach, you know.

My father was Polish Goral and he called them holubki. But he lived very near Spisz which was Slovakian.


Last edited by Bill Rushin on Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:15 am; edited 1 time in total
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Bill Rushin
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

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Post Posted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 2:57 pm      Post subject:
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I have a recipe if you want it. Most are made with a tomato based broth but they are also very good plain. The cabbage taste is much more defined this way. They are very easily made in a croc pot also. Smile


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Polish Golabki
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Zenon
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Joined: 28 Apr 2007
Replies: 1464
Location: Poland

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:22 am      Post subject:
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This luscious picture reminds how almost everyone of my FTT guests reacts on Polish food. There are a few elements of which everyone is delighted and positively surprised:

- Taste of our food. As they say, the dishes have REAL taste Exclamation No "plastic" nor "chemistry" in it, especially if you have chance to stay and eat in one of the agritourism houses where the owner cooks by itself. I often hear reactions like: "I can taste the real flavor of tomato, at last Exclamation.

- The look of the dishes which, as all we know (consciously or subconsciously), has significant meaning for our appetite. This is not rare for my guests to pull out their cameras in restaurant and take pictures of the tables with food on it Wink.

- Affordable prices, especially at the country or in restaurants along the roads: "Only 50 zloty ($ 17) for full, filling dinner for three persons Exclamation Question"


Just look at the two abstracts:

- Tour with Louie: http://polishorigins.com/document/welnas_story .

- Tour with James: http://blog.polishorigins.com/2009/05/19/my-second-visit-to-poland-forefathers-traces-tour-with-james-day-5/ .

And believe me, this is not only men who react so enthusiastically Very Happy .


P.S. Correct Polish spelling of the dish on picture is gołąbki and it is pronounced this way: click here to listen to.


Last edited by Zenon on Thu Dec 30, 2010 3:27 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Rich Gibson



Joined: 01 Dec 2010
Replies: 6

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:57 am      Post subject:
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My mother's family is Polish and I grew up in Chicago. My wife's is completely Polish. We were married in St. John Cantius in Chicago's 'Little Poland.' Why even our wedding reception was held at Przybyla's hall (White Eagle if I recall). I grew up on Polish food. When my last surviving uncle was spending his final years in a nursing home I would visit him and then go to Little Poland to bring back to Washington DC some kielbase, beef barley soup, potato fingers and pierogi for my wife. We would go to Kasia's on North Avenue for it. Kasia would sponsor many young Polish girls to work there. The elder gents enjoyed seeing and hearing the lovely young ladies speak their pure native Polish to the customers. Although I don't speak it (when I grew up my elders insisted we learn English to be successful) it sounded like old times hearing the language I grew up with. The place was always jam-packed.

What s surprise we had one day recently when we saw pierogi's for sale in Costco's here in northern Virginia, a giant warehouse outlet here in the U.S. What an even greater surprise when we discovered it was Kasia's! Turning the package over we saw her familiar face on the box. Last Sunday we invited my youngest son over for his birthday dinner and surprised everyone with the pierogis. We made 72 of them and they all disappeared. It was neat seeing my grandchildren wolf them down exclaiming how delicious they were (fried in butter, of course!)
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BobK
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008
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Location: Portland, Oregon USA

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Post Posted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 11:29 pm      Post subject:
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Every Christmas, my sister knows exactly what I want - a package of goodies from Rapaki's in Floral Park L.I. - There is always their homemade Babka, and Rapaki's own kielbasa. I haven't looked for kielbasa in Costco here in Portland Oregon, but believe me - the rare few that make it here on the west coast don't have a clue of how to make it Polish style. I've had it where is was nothing more than spiced hotdog meat, I even had one that they forgot to remove the fat (or forgot to add the meat)..

I want you to know that not ALL Polish immigrants went to Chicago. There was a very large area of Williamsburg Brooklyn that was 100% Polish until the 1960's (when the immigrants died off, and their children spread throughout Long Island)
My German grandparents lived some blocks away, at the time, in the German section of Williamsburg (where Dad met Mom).



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All Polska



Joined: 05 Jul 2010
Replies: 48
Location: Florida, USA

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Post Posted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 12:51 pm      Post subject:
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I have my family's recipe for golabki, if anyone is interested. I go to a nearby town to a Polish Deli for their home made Krakowska, Kolbassi and kolbassi sticks. They sale a large golabki for $6.50 each!
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:07 pm      Post subject:
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Wow, that's outrageous! I made 16 fat ones in 45 min. for Christmas and I spent about $13.00. My cousin works in a Polish deli in Chicago, I will ask what they are getting for them. 10 years ago in Ohio my butcher would sell them for $18.00 a dozen.
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All Polska



Joined: 05 Jul 2010
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Location: Florida, USA

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Post Posted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:46 pm      Post subject:
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I know. They were very big, but still outrageous! There was a man in there buying them for his mother for her birthday. He said she was too old to make them now. He bought her the golabki, pierogi (which were flown in frozen from Chicago) and kolbassi! In spite of the cost, I thought he was a very thoughtful son finding a gift his mom would relish! Smile
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KKempa



Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Replies: 43
Location: Ontario, Canada

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Post Posted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 5:47 pm      Post subject:
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My mother taught me how to make cabbage rolls. She was born in Canada, 1923 -- her brothers and sisters were all born in a tiny village in Ukraine. Grandmother's husband's family lived in the same village but was of Polish ancestry. Mother has many memories that she shares of growing up during the Great Depression -- the family didn't have much money so had to economize as much as possible Most meals that had some meat involved, only used "bacon ends" from the local butcher -- the trimmings from the ends of bacon slices that were cheapest so bacon features in many of grandma's and mom's recipes.

Mom married a Polish man and changed her cooking a little bit to suit his tastes. There are never any measurements given for her old recipes -- just "till it tastes right". She would mix about half lean ground pork and half lean ground beef -- I find "lean" isn't really lean from grocery stores these days so I usually lightly fry the ground meat first so I can drain off most of the fat and then let it cool a bit. Mom never cooked it first. Mix the ground meat with about the same amount of cooked white rice. Dice about 4-6 slices of bacon (depending on taste, how much bacon flavour you want) and fry until just done. Drain and add to bowl of ground meat and rice. Lightly fry some diced yellow onion (cooking onions), about one medium onion per pound of meat, in the same pan you cooked the bacon in. Add to the bowl and sprinkle with salt & pepper to taste. A couple of garlic cloves, minced and sauteed with the onion when the onion is almost done is good to add -- mom didn't use garlic too often because dad didn't care for it. When you don't lightly fry the meat first, that's it for the filling but if you do fry it first or love the tomato flavour a lot, add a little tomato sauce (or tomato juice) and mix throughly.

The cabbage -- when I was young, mom would have a big pot of boiling water and would add a few cabbage leaves at a time to the pot, pull them out when wilted enough to be pliable. In later days, she found that putting the cored head of cabbage in her deep freezer (not the refrigerator freezer) for two days was better -- no boiling the cabbage leaves. After it was thawed, it was pliable and easy to handle. Remove the thick rib from the cabbage leaf and put the "right amount" of filling close to the rounded end of the cabbage leaf. Flip up that rounded edge over the filling and then turn in the sides of the cabbage leaf (over the ends of the filling) and then roll into the traditional shape. Put each cabbage roll into a cabbage leaf lined small roasting pan (big enough for at least two or three layers of cabbage rolls. Pour more tomato sauce over all -- a mixture of sauce and tomato juice or sauce and canned, diced tomatoes is good, not too much juice/sauce, just to kind of "coat" everything. Cover the rolls with one layer of leftover cabbage leaves (the small pieces) and pour a little more tomato sauce/juice over top. Put roaster lid on and bake in a 325 degree oven until cabbage and filling are cooked. If pan has too much juice, remove lid and bake a little longer.

My good friend, who is a vegetarian, makes cabbage rolls once a week because she loves them. She uses President's Choice (says it's better than St Yves) ground "round" (soy) -- I think the Italian spiced kind mostly but sometimes plain. I've eaten hers many times and they are very tasty!
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Wisniewskip



Joined: 08 Apr 2012
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Post Posted: Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:15 am      Post subject: blind pigeons/stuffed cabbage recipe/
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Combine and set aside:
1.5 pounds of lean ground beef
1.5 pounds of ground pork
You could use meat loaf mix from meat counter instead of mixing your own.
1 cup of cooked rice (let it cool)
2 cups finely chopped onion (an estimate)
1 teaspoon of salt (an estimate)
pepper
Mix in a large bowl:
2 family size cans of Campbell's tomato soup (not the regular size, that would be 5 cans)
Some milk to dilute the soup (sometimes my grandmother used some sour cream as well)
Next,
Heat water to boiling in a pot large enough to submerge the cabbage. Remove outer leaves of cabbage and discard. Make deep cuts around the core. Submerge the cabbage core end down. Heat until the outer leaves are soft. Remove and peel. Repeat until you have enough leaves to wrap meat. You can cut up any extra and put into the broth, or double wrap the meat. My family loves the cabbage so I do both. Shape meat into loaves that are long rather than round. I get about 10 or so blind pigeons from 3 pounds. Wrap with cabbage. Spray a roast pan with PAM.
Mix the soup and some milk and spread some on the bottom. Lay the stuffed cabbages in the roast pan with extra cabbage tucked in. Pour the soup mixture on top, cover and cook at 350 degrees for 1.5 to 2 hours. Serve with mashed potatoes and ladle soup mixture on like gravy. My grandmother, born in 1891, made them this way. They are even better leftover on the second day. Enjoy!
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