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jeanne329



Joined: 03 Mar 2017
Replies: 7
Location: United States

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Post Posted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:31 pm      Post subject: Deby Szlacheckie-Glosniak
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I have gained invaluable information on this forum. The contributors here have helped with records and translations so I could understand the records and family I am searching. I hope someone can help with this.
I am trying to find out what happened to a Seweryn Glosniak born 1902 to Antoni Glosniak and Agnieska Blaskowski. When Antoni immigrated to the US, it took him 9 years to get his family to America. He got his wife and 3 of his children to American by 1910 but was never able to get Seweryn there. The "story" is the government would not let the child immigrate because he was infirm. It is believed it had to do with his legs which he was born with. His father Antoni listed him on the Naturalization records I think in the belief that if America naturalized him (even if it was a lie), he could get him out of the country. As it happened, Antoni suffered a stroke sometimes after naturalization and all efforts to get Seweryn in America stopped. The naturalization was filed 1918 so we know Seweryn was alive at that point. They became naturalized in 1922. We do not have a clue when Seweryn would have or how he died. We do know the family was from Deby Szlacheckie and extended family stayed there. It was where they lived from about 1800. Seweryn was born in 1901. I would like to find out what happened to Seweryn. We do not know who he stayed with. I have records for this family (baptism records) so that isn't what I am looking for. Attached is Seweryn's baptism record.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.



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Jeanne
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Sophia



Joined: 05 Oct 2014
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Post Posted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:08 am      Post subject:
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Hi Jeanne,
It's a heartbreaking story, isn't it? I understand your wish to follow through and find out what became of Seweryn. Did you get a full translation for his baptism record? It would give you the names of Seweryn's two sets of grandparents as well as his godparents, and that would seem to be a likely group of people with whom Seweryn might have lived after his parents and siblings emigrated. Do you have a link to where you found this baptism record? It would be useful to see what other years are available online for that church's records.
I think you may also be interested to look at the attached, http://familysearch.org/wiki/en/United_States_Naturalization_and_Citizenship and scroll way down to "Exceptions to the Process." This describes how children of immigrants derived their citizenship from their father - - specifically, once the father was naturalized, the child was then a citizen of the U.S. I am saying this because I do not think there was any dishonest intent whatsoever when Antoni listed Seweryn on his application for naturalization. The key question (and you'll have to look for sources other than what I linked to, in order to find out for sure) is whether or not Seweryn was too old by the the time Antoni naturalized for this to apply to him. Did the rule mean that a child had to be younger than a certain age at the time of the application, or at the time of the naturalization? In Seweryn's case, that would seem to be a critical distinction.
Best of luck in your research,
Sophia
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jeanne329



Joined: 03 Mar 2017
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Location: United States

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Post Posted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 8:44 pm      Post subject:
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Thank you Sophia,

As I understood it, in Illinois as long as the children were under 21 at the time of Naturalization, the final degree, the children were naturalized. This was before 1929. Seweryn would have been 20. His birthdate was in September and his father signed the papers in March 1922. His older son had just turned 21 a week before and had to naturalize on his own even though he was listed in the papers. Antoni stated all 4 of the children were in Chicago when he filed.

I did get the baptism record transcribed. The grandparents were not listed in the baptism record. The Godparents were; Franciszek Rybicki and Adamina Mądrzak. Rybicki would be a relation to Seweryn's maternal grandmother. Adamina Madrzak, I do not know.

Thank you for the suggestions. I did request a record search for C-files at the archives for any possible record not in state Naturalization files. I hope they turn up something that would give me more clues. I have this family very well researched in the US and family in Poland back to late 1700s but only what I can find online for records. Seweryn eludes me. Antoni was in America when he was born and he was baptised (the midwife took him) hours after birth. When I looked at his siblings baptism records it was a few days. I think they might have thought Seweryn wouldn't survive.

I appreciate your response.
Jeanne

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Sophia



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Post Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:41 am      Post subject:
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Hi Jeanne,
I went back to look at your discussion from March, and at the translation of Seweryn's baptism record. It is fascinating to see the detail there of when Antoni went to the U.S. (March 1902). I wonder if you have records of Antoni going to the U.S. more than once. I ask, because he is mentioned among a list of other people in a German-language newspaper in October 1901 (see attached file). The newspaper was "Der Deutsche Correspondent", a Baltimore paper, and the relevant part is on page 5, column 3, partway down the page, look at the second paragraph under the heading "Zuruck gefandt." It seems to be saying that this group of immigrants was going to have to go back after they fulfilled some type of contract work. If it interests you, you can ask Michael on the German Records Translation thread for a real translation of it.
I also looked at the geneteka records to see what is indexed for Deby Szlacheckie, and then on to szukajwarchiwach to see what other years there would be for the church which might not have been indexed yet. I gather that I am just retracing your footsteps and those of all the people who helped back in that earlier thread. Of course, what I wanted to find was church records recent enough that I could look for a marriage or death record of Seweryn, or even a record of baptism for children of his, and you already know that there are no images for baptisms after 1905, none for marriages after 1908 and none for deaths after 1898. At least not yet. My Plan B was to look at Seweryn's grandparents and godparents, and see if they were from villages nearby rather than from Deby Szlacheckie, to see if there was a logical direction in which to look for a neighboring church where Seweryn might have married, etc. No luck there.
When I was looking at the church book for Deby Schlacheckie for baptisms 1899-1905, just paging through it online, I saw the typical margin notations for quite a few other people, where a priest who was marrying or burying someone would go back to the baptism record and add a note there. For Seweryn, there is no margin note, and while this is by no means proof that he didn't stay attached to that church for the rest of his life, it does at least leave open the possibility that he moved on to another place and thus another church. The only thing that I see that seems unusual in his baptism record is that very small "x" at the end of the record, looks like nothing really, but could have been some notation from the priest to himself. Or am I stretching it?
Thanks for explaining the naturalization age regulation, and the experience of Seweryn's older brother. I find it very interesting. So I gather that Seweryn was indeed naturalized. Perhaps, at the age of 21, he was already well rooted in where he was living and decided not follow the family. It would be lovely to find some follow-up record for him. If I have any brainstorms, I will let you know.
Best,
Sophia



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jeanne329



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Post Posted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:17 pm      Post subject:
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Sophia,

This is an excellent find! Thank you. I think I have someone to translate. If not, I will ask on the forum.

Antoni came with his brother in 1901 with his brother Stanislaw (Stanley) and then went back home. He came in 1902 and then went back home. He came for good in 1905 and never left again that we know. I have all three passenger lists. His wife and oldest child came in 1909 and his last two children were escorted by her sister Regina Blaskowski in 1910. They just missed the census as they hadn't gotten from the east coast to Chicago yet but were in route. On the 1910 census, Agnes states she had 4 children and all 4 are living. We know we're not missing children.

The family didn't talk about Seweryn. They knew of him in so much as one existed but no real discussions. The story was (and some of the family stories have been proven false because of lack of discussions), that Seweryn was burned in his wheelchair due to his infirmy. We now know he was alive in at least 1918. We think talking to another family member that there was a phone call in the early 1960's from Poland but it's content is unknown. His nephew, Antoni's grandson thought maybe about Seweryn but can't be sure. The only thing we know for sure is he was still alive in 1918. Agnes was from Malokno. I haven't researched her family as much. I had her father Thomas Blaszkowski and Julianna Rybicka as her mother and they are listed on her marriage record if I remember right. At least Thomas was.

We wondered why Antoni was back and forth so much and thought because he was working and saving to get his family here. His brother never left the country once he came. Several of Agnes' siblings immigrated.

Your help is very much appreciated! I appreciate your research and thoughts on this family. I've spent 6 years researching them and there just isn't a lot of information because of what happened to Antoni.

Jeanne

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