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Latin records translations
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Tue Nov 10, 2020 9:29 pm      Post subject: Re: Plunge Parish Death Record
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David2019 wrote:
Hi,

Could you please assist me with the finer points of this 1807 Plunge Parish (Lithuania) death record (e.g. his title etc. and does it mention his wife's name or is that just more flowery language)?

Thanks


Hi,

I’m not sure of the language into which you want personal names translated so I will give the Polish version of his name first followed by the Lithuanian version and then the English form.

Much of the geography in the record is beyond my field of knowledge and thus several of the place names are my best guess. Until the 3rd Partition in 1795 the parish where he was buried was part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as a region of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. In 1795 it was seized by Russia and directly incorporated into the Russian Empire and was never again Polish territory. While it was part of the Commonwealth it was known as the Duchy or the Eldership of Samogitia (Polish: Księstwo żmudzkie; Lithuanian: Žemaičių seniūnija ) (cf. attached map). The cropped section of the map of the Partitions of Poland shows the location of Plunge under the Polish version of the name, Płungiany.

Anyway, here follows the translation of the record. I hope you find it helpful.

Dave

Left Margin: Bukuntyszki(?)
Body of Entry: In the Year of Our Lord 1807 on the 18th day of the month of August his honor Pan* Jerzy (Polish) Džordžas (Lithuanian) George (English) Georgius (Latin) Dyrmowicz, treasurer of Rozieki(?), about 87 years of age, from the territory of Bununtyszki(?) of the parish of Plunge, fortified by the Sacraments of Penance, Extreme Unction, and Most Holy Viaticum**, died, whose body was buried in the parish cemetery.

Notes: Magnificus Dominus/his honor Pan: a title used for a court official. Pan is the Polish version of Sir/Lord.
**These three sacraments were collectively known as The Last Rites. Viaticum was the term used for Communion received before death.



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David2019



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Post Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2020 7:43 am      Post subject: Plunge Parish Death Record
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Thanks Dave, very hepful.
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Jillian W



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Post Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2020 11:02 am      Post subject: Occupation Translation
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My grateful thanks to Dave for the explanation of the Latin phrases.

Jan acted as a godparent at the baptism of a child whose father was a soldier in the 40th Line Infantry Regiment in Jaslo. His given occupation appears to be the same as the one given in his burial entry. Attached is the original entry which I'm guessing is in Jan's own handwriting as well as a duplicate in a different hand which may be easier to read.

I would appreciate any help in deciphering his occupation; also who was most likely to have been his employer - would it have been the military or the local government?

Jillian



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:08 pm      Post subject: Re: Occupation Translation
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Jillian W wrote:
My grateful thanks to Dave for the explanation of the Latin phrases.

Jan acted as a godparent at the baptism of a child whose father was a soldier in the 40th Line Infantry Regiment in Jaslo. His given occupation appears to be the same as the one given in his burial entry. Attached is the original entry which I'm guessing is in Jan's own handwriting as well as a duplicate in a different hand which may be easier to read.

I would appreciate any help in deciphering his occupation; also who was most likely to have been his employer - would it have been the military or the local government?

Jillian


Hi Jillian,

Although the final word in yesterday’s death record post is viduus, Latin for widower, the rest of the words which do appear to be in the same type of script as that used in today’s posts, which is German script. I do not read German script and cannot help you with the occupation. The thread where you should post your question is German Records Translations—https://forum.polishorigins.com/viewtopic.php?p=53280#53280 I’m confident that Michael will be able to help you.

Wishing you success,

Dave
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Jillian W



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Post Posted: Wed Nov 11, 2020 4:12 pm      Post subject: Occupation Translation
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Dave, thank you so much for all your help - it's greatly appreciated. I have re-posted as suggested.
My very best wishes.
Jillian
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trinkelson



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Post Posted: Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:57 pm      Post subject: Latin "scultetus"?
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For the Latin literate, unlike me, am I interpreting correctly the Conditio column of the father as "scultetus"? I ask because a fair amount of googling does not bring up that word. The record in question is Akt no 10 at https://szukajwarchiwach.pl/53/3256/0/6.1/17/skan/full/BmI6c_3tRbCt4vKfa38kYw A screen grab is attached here also. If scultetus is correct, what does it mean? And, if a good resource for translating the various conditios is available, a link would be appreciated.

Thanks.



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:05 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin "scultetus"?
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trinkelson wrote:
For the Latin literate, unlike me, am I interpreting correctly the Conditio column of the father as "scultetus"? I ask because a fair amount of googling does not bring up that word. The record in question is Akt no 10 at https://szukajwarchiwach.pl/53/3256/0/6.1/17/skan/full/BmI6c_3tRbCt4vKfa38kYw A screen grab is attached here also. If scultetus is correct, what does it mean? And, if a good resource for translating the various conditios is available, a link would be appreciated.

Thanks.


Hi,

You are reading the word correctly. Scultetus sculteti, m. is a village administrator. The Polish equivalent is sołtys or wójt.

In Post-Classical Latin there was a great increase in the number of words found in Latin vocabulary. Classical Latin had approximately 30,000 words. (English has over 250,000, although not all are in current use.) I’ve not seen any study which gives the number of Latin words in existence at the end of the 19th Century. However, Latin scholars after WWI planned to compile a single lexicon of Medieval Latin from the countries of Europe. Soon they realized that the task was not practical because of the number of words unique to each country and so the decision was made that each European country would compile its own lexicon. In Poland the project was interrupted by WWII but resumed after the war and is still ongoing. The last time I checked the editors were working on the letter t. Suffice it to say, the list of words is very long. Because there was considerable variation in Latin vocabulary as used in the various countries of Europe no “master list” of words has been compiled and thus the Google difficulty. The word scultetus was pretty much limited to Central Europe. It appears in Latin documents from Poland, Germany, and some other countries but was not used elsewhere. Another Central European word found on the same page is censuarius, which means a tenant farmer or a long term tenant. I doubt that Google would help with that word either. Another interesting Central European word (which I’ve only seen in records from German ruled Poland) is abcedrix, which means a female teacher (of elementary school). As a general rule, Latin words of the 3rd Declension which end in “or” are masculine. The feminine is formed by dropping the “or” and adding “rix” (e.g. braxeator is a male brewer [of beer] and braxeatrix is a female brewer).

In response to your question about words found in the “Conditio et professio patris” (Condition/social status/standing and profession/occupation of the father) column, I cannot think of any resource such as you seek. For the “conditio” part I’ll post a PDF which lists the specialized meaning of Latin terms used in Poland. Perhaps you may find it useful. A few years ago I compiled a list of about 500 Latin occupational terms which I have seen in Latin records from Poland. My thought was to do something similar to the list of Latin proper names with their Polish and English equivalents which I compiled and have posted several times over the years. Basically I could never decide whether it is worth the effort and whether or not I really want to spend the time on something which may or may not prove useful to those who use this forum.

On a somewhat related topic...since all my ancestors (except for my mother, who was born in Chicago) were from either Wielkopolskie or Kujawsko-Pomorskie I’ve found the Słownik geograficzny to be a valuable tool to better understand the places where my ancestors lived. Here is a link to the entry for Bytyń—the 2nd entry on the page: http://dir.icm.edu.pl/pl/Slownik_geograficzny/Tom_I/521 You may find it interesting and informative since Andrzej was a village official, probably of the village and estate which was owned by the Niegolewski family. It is interesting to note the high literacy rate there—of the 350 inhabitants more than 50% were literate, which was good for rural 19th Century Europe.

If you have any additional questions or comments, please post them.

Wishing you happy researching,

Dave



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trinkelson



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Post Posted: Sun Nov 15, 2020 9:29 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin "scultetus"?
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Hi Dave

Thanks for your very informative response. I had consulted your list of Latin terms before posting the question here but had not found scultetus. But, nevertheless, the list has proven very useful on other occasions. Out of curiosity, do you have any insight on the etymology of scultetus? Thanks also for the link to the Słownik.

Regards

Richard
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Mon Nov 16, 2020 4:07 am      Post subject: Re: Latin "scultetus"?
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trinkelson wrote:
Hi Dave

Thanks for your very informative response. I had consulted your list of Latin terms before posting the question here but had not found scultetus. But, nevertheless, the list has proven very useful on other occasions. Out of curiosity, do you have any insight on the etymology of scultetus? Thanks also for the link to the Słownik.

Regards

Richard


Hi Richard,

Sometimes the etymology of late Latin words is fairly obvious, but that is not the case here. I wouldn’t want to hazard a guess without anything solid to back up the guess. Sorry that I can’t be of more help.

Dave
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td85



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Post Posted: 7 Days ago at 10:14 pm      Post subject:
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I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


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House 24 - Maiden name of Semko Dwulit's wife, Anna. Kind of looks like Czupki to me, but I could be wrong.
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House 42 - I can't make out the name of the Dwulit marrying Marya Bacz. It's unlike any name I've seen before.
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: 6 Days ago at 8:33 pm      Post subject:
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td85 wrote:
I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


Hi,

In the 1788 marriage record the groom is Sabbas (also can be spelled Sabas). The Latin form of the name is Sabba, ae, m. (also Saba, ae, m.). There are several saints of that name and the most famous was a monk who lived in the area near Jerusalem (born 439; died 532). He was venerated by eastern Christians, both Orthodox and Catholic.

In the house #24 record the maiden name also appears to me as Czupki. This opinion comes with the caveat that surnames are always in the vernacular and not in Latin so that opinion is based on how I read the handwriting.

I’m not sure what you would like for the house #3 record. Please let me know & I’ll help if I am able.

Thanks,

Dave
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td85



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Post Posted: 6 Days ago at 11:44 pm      Post subject:
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dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


Hi,

In the 1788 marriage record the groom is Sabbas (also can be spelled Sabas). The Latin form of the name is Sabba, ae, m. (also Saba, ae, m.). There are several saints of that name and the most famous was a monk who lived in the area near Jerusalem (born 439; died 532). He was venerated by eastern Christians, both Orthodox and Catholic.

In the house #24 record the maiden name also appears to me as Czupki. This opinion comes with the caveat that surnames are always in the vernacular and not in Latin so that opinion is based on how I read the handwriting.

I’m not sure what you would like for the house #3 record. Please let me know & I’ll help if I am able.

Thanks,

Dave


Thank you so much, Dave.

With the record for house #3, it's the parents of Michael that I'm struggling with a little bit. I want to say it says his father is Stefan Kuchlyk? Son of Stefan and Anna Dwulit and for the mother, Nastazya Marunka is all I can really make out. Thank you again!
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: 5 Days ago at 2:18 pm      Post subject:
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td85 wrote:
dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


Hi,

In the 1788 marriage record the groom is Sabbas (also can be spelled Sabas). The Latin form of the name is Sabba, ae, m. (also Saba, ae, m.). There are several saints of that name and the most famous was a monk who lived in the area near Jerusalem (born 439; died 532). He was venerated by eastern Christians, both Orthodox and Catholic.

In the house #24 record the maiden name also appears to me as Czupki. This opinion comes with the caveat that surnames are always in the vernacular and not in Latin so that opinion is based on how I read the handwriting.

I’m not sure what you would like for the house #3 record. Please let me know & I’ll help if I am able.

Thanks,

Dave


Thank you so much, Dave.

With the record for house #3, it's the parents of Michael that I'm struggling with a little bit. I want to say it says his father is Stefan Kuchlyk? Son of Stefan and Anna Dwulit and for the mother, Nastazya Marunka is all I can really make out. Thank you again!


Hi,

Preliminary remarks...The priest did not always follow standard Latin spellings of given names. This is most understandable since Latin was not his primary ecclesiastical language. These records are civil transcripts of the parish registers and were created at the behest of the Austrian government which required that the transcripts be kept in the Latin language. At times the Polish version is substituted for the Latin form of some names. The way letters are formed is not always consistent or easy to read. Spellings in Polish are what was commonly used during the 19th Century but are not the same as current Polish spellings.

I believe that your interpretation of the father’s surname as Kuchlyk is correct. (The same surname appears in the next entry for the child Gregorius/Grzegorz.

Here are the entries as they were written:
Stefanus Kuchlyk rust. ex patre Stefano et matre Maryanna de Dwulit.
Entry in standard Latin: Stephanus Kuchlyk rusticus ex patre Stephano et matre Marianna de Dwulit.
Translation: Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) Kuchlyk, a farmer, (born) of the father Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) and the mother Maryanna (19th Century Polish spelling: Maryanna; Contemporary Polish spelling: Marianna) née Dwulit
The Mother as written: Tatianna ex patre Jacenty Skryp et matre Nastazya de Marunka
Entry in standard Latin: Tatianna ex patre Hyacintho Skryp et matre Nastasia de Marunka.
Translation: Tatianna (born) of the father Hyacinth (Polish:Jacenty) Skryp and of the mother Nastasia (19th Cent. Polish spelling: Nastazya; Contemporary Polish spelling: Nastazja née Marunka.

Notes: Polish has two formal versions for the name Stephen, Stefan and Szczepan, It is not self-evident which form he would have used in daily life.
Tatianna was reputed to be a 3rd Century Roman martyr. She was venerated in the western (Roman) and the eastern churches—both Orthodox & Catholic.
Nastasia and Anastasia are variations of the Greek word which means resurrection (ἀνάστασις).

I hope this answers your questions.

Dave
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td85



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Post Posted: 5 Days ago at 7:48 pm      Post subject:
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dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


Hi,

In the 1788 marriage record the groom is Sabbas (also can be spelled Sabas). The Latin form of the name is Sabba, ae, m. (also Saba, ae, m.). There are several saints of that name and the most famous was a monk who lived in the area near Jerusalem (born 439; died 532). He was venerated by eastern Christians, both Orthodox and Catholic.

In the house #24 record the maiden name also appears to me as Czupki. This opinion comes with the caveat that surnames are always in the vernacular and not in Latin so that opinion is based on how I read the handwriting.

I’m not sure what you would like for the house #3 record. Please let me know & I’ll help if I am able.

Thanks,

Dave


Thank you so much, Dave.

With the record for house #3, it's the parents of Michael that I'm struggling with a little bit. I want to say it says his father is Stefan Kuchlyk? Son of Stefan and Anna Dwulit and for the mother, Nastazya Marunka is all I can really make out. Thank you again!


Hi,

Preliminary remarks...The priest did not always follow standard Latin spellings of given names. This is most understandable since Latin was not his primary ecclesiastical language. These records are civil transcripts of the parish registers and were created at the behest of the Austrian government which required that the transcripts be kept in the Latin language. At times the Polish version is substituted for the Latin form of some names. The way letters are formed is not always consistent or easy to read. Spellings in Polish are what was commonly used during the 19th Century but are not the same as current Polish spellings.

I believe that your interpretation of the father’s surname as Kuchlyk is correct. (The same surname appears in the next entry for the child Gregorius/Grzegorz.

Here are the entries as they were written:
Stefanus Kuchlyk rust. ex patre Stefano et matre Maryanna de Dwulit.
Entry in standard Latin: Stephanus Kuchlyk rusticus ex patre Stephano et matre Marianna de Dwulit.
Translation: Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) Kuchlyk, a farmer, (born) of the father Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) and the mother Maryanna (19th Century Polish spelling: Maryanna; Contemporary Polish spelling: Marianna) née Dwulit
The Mother as written: Tatianna ex patre Jacenty Skryp et matre Nastazya de Marunka
Entry in standard Latin: Tatianna ex patre Hyacintho Skryp et matre Nastasia de Marunka.
Translation: Tatianna (born) of the father Hyacinth (Polish:Jacenty) Skryp and of the mother Nastasia (19th Cent. Polish spelling: Nastazya; Contemporary Polish spelling: Nastazja née Marunka.

Notes: Polish has two formal versions for the name Stephen, Stefan and Szczepan, It is not self-evident which form he would have used in daily life.
Tatianna was reputed to be a 3rd Century Roman martyr. She was venerated in the western (Roman) and the eastern churches—both Orthodox & Catholic.
Nastasia and Anastasia are variations of the Greek word which means resurrection (ἀνάστασις).

I hope this answers your questions.

Dave


Wonderful, thank you so very much for helping me with these records and the additional information you've provided. Finally, I have one last record that I need to figure out before I can finally start putting the pieces together and figuring out my lineage.



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House 40: Having a problem with the last name of Semion's father, Michael. The rest I have no problem figuring out (mother: Anastazya Strzelecka, godparents: Bazyli Kuczer and Teodosia Jarema)
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: 4 Days ago at 10:23 am      Post subject:
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td85 wrote:
dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
dnowicki wrote:
td85 wrote:
I originally posted these in the Polish translations thread, but because they're actually written in Latin I've moved them to this topic. I'm researching my Dwulit ancestors from the villages of Boryslawka and Posada Rybotycka. They were Ruthenian Greek Catholics. Any help means a lot.


Hi,

In the 1788 marriage record the groom is Sabbas (also can be spelled Sabas). The Latin form of the name is Sabba, ae, m. (also Saba, ae, m.). There are several saints of that name and the most famous was a monk who lived in the area near Jerusalem (born 439; died 532). He was venerated by eastern Christians, both Orthodox and Catholic.

In the house #24 record the maiden name also appears to me as Czupki. This opinion comes with the caveat that surnames are always in the vernacular and not in Latin so that opinion is based on how I read the handwriting.

I’m not sure what you would like for the house #3 record. Please let me know & I’ll help if I am able.

Thanks,

Dave


Thank you so much, Dave.

With the record for house #3, it's the parents of Michael that I'm struggling with a little bit. I want to say it says his father is Stefan Kuchlyk? Son of Stefan and Anna Dwulit and for the mother, Nastazya Marunka is all I can really make out. Thank you again!


Hi,

Preliminary remarks...The priest did not always follow standard Latin spellings of given names. This is most understandable since Latin was not his primary ecclesiastical language. These records are civil transcripts of the parish registers and were created at the behest of the Austrian government which required that the transcripts be kept in the Latin language. At times the Polish version is substituted for the Latin form of some names. The way letters are formed is not always consistent or easy to read. Spellings in Polish are what was commonly used during the 19th Century but are not the same as current Polish spellings.

I believe that your interpretation of the father’s surname as Kuchlyk is correct. (The same surname appears in the next entry for the child Gregorius/Grzegorz.

Here are the entries as they were written:
Stefanus Kuchlyk rust. ex patre Stefano et matre Maryanna de Dwulit.
Entry in standard Latin: Stephanus Kuchlyk rusticus ex patre Stephano et matre Marianna de Dwulit.
Translation: Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) Kuchlyk, a farmer, (born) of the father Stephen (Polish: Stefan or Szczepan) and the mother Maryanna (19th Century Polish spelling: Maryanna; Contemporary Polish spelling: Marianna) née Dwulit
The Mother as written: Tatianna ex patre Jacenty Skryp et matre Nastazya de Marunka
Entry in standard Latin: Tatianna ex patre Hyacintho Skryp et matre Nastasia de Marunka.
Translation: Tatianna (born) of the father Hyacinth (Polish:Jacenty) Skryp and of the mother Nastasia (19th Cent. Polish spelling: Nastazya; Contemporary Polish spelling: Nastazja née Marunka.

Notes: Polish has two formal versions for the name Stephen, Stefan and Szczepan, It is not self-evident which form he would have used in daily life.
Tatianna was reputed to be a 3rd Century Roman martyr. She was venerated in the western (Roman) and the eastern churches—both Orthodox & Catholic.
Nastasia and Anastasia are variations of the Greek word which means resurrection (ἀνάστασις).

I hope this answers your questions.

Dave


Wonderful, thank you so very much for helping me with these records and the additional information you've provided. Finally, I have one last record that I need to figure out before I can finally start putting the pieces together and figuring out my lineage.


Hi,

I’m afraid that I can’t be of much help to you on this question. Latin is my strong suit and not necessarily the interpretation of handwriting in surnames—especially those with which I’m not at all familiar. I usually try to determine doubtful handwritten letters by comparing them to letters in words of which I am certain. Unfortunately, on this page there are not enough such words to really help with the letters in the surname. The initial letter is similar, but not identical, to the upper case F in Februarius in the second entry on the page. It also is similar, but not identical, to the upper case T in the name of the father, Timoteus (correct Latin spelling: Timotheus) in the previous entry. My best guess is that the surname appears to be either Felbak or Telbak. The same surname appears as the surname of the father in the second entry on the page. Unfortunately, that is of no help since two unknowns cannot result in a known as a conclusion. My best advice is to post the page with your request in a new thread to increase the chances that Sophia or someone else may be able to provide you with a better answer.

Sorry that I can’t be of more help.

Dave
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