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Latin records translations
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Tue Nov 23, 2021 8:42 pm      Post subject:
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zolkie wrote:
Hi Dave,

I've got two images that I hope you're willing to translate for me. Each is a birth record for children of Maximillian Lewicki and Juliana Strzelbicki (sp?). I believe that Maximillian was the priest/administrator for the town and as such he didn't preside over the baptism of his own children. I believe Nicolaus Strzelbicki did that from a neighboring parish/town, and I don't think it's a stretch to believe that Julianna and Nicolaus were related. However, my Latin isn't very good, so I want to make sure I don't miss any of the subtleties of the translation.
Thanks so much!

[/img]


Hi Zolkie,

Nicolaus (Mikołaj) Strzelbicki is Julianna’s father, which would be why he baptized the two children, his grandchildren. The reason Maximilianus (Maksymilian) did not baptize his own children is that a spiritual relationship of affinity arises between the person baptizing and the person being baptized. Since a biological relationship of consanguinity (father & son) exists between Maximilianus (Maksymilian) and his two sons the biological relationship of consanguinity precludes and eliminates the possibility of the spiritual relationship of affinity arising between the person baptizing and the person being baptized. Bottom line is that a Greek Catholic priest was not permitted to baptize his own children.

I’ll translate the two entries tomorrow and fill in more details. Since I believe that the villages in question which in the 19th Century were part of Galicia are not part of contemporary Poland I would greatly appreciate it if you would provide me with the geographical info which you have. That info will make it much easier for me to deal with the places named in the records.

Thanks.

Dave
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zolkie



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Post Posted: Thu Nov 25, 2021 7:32 am      Post subject:
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Hi Dave. Happy Thanksgiving! Thank you for the explanation regarding the relationship between Maximilianus and Nicolaus, and why Nicolaus baptized the children.
Here's the geographical information that I've been able to glean from the records:
I believe the birth records are from the town of Worobijowka, which is now located in Ukraine and is known as Vorobiivka.
The town in which Nicolaus is listed as a priest is Jezierna, which is also located in modern day Ukraine and is known as Ozerna. Since my original post, I've discovered additional birth records for children of Maximilanus and Julianna and in those records the priest who baptized the children was not Nicolaus, but a different priest from the town/parish of Isypowce. Isypowce is also in modern day Ukraine and is known as Vysypivtsi . All three towns are in the Tarnopol district I believe.
Hope this helps!
Jeff
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Thu Nov 25, 2021 10:04 am      Post subject:
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zolkie wrote:
Hi Dave. Happy Thanksgiving! Thank you for the explanation regarding the relationship between Maximilianus and Nicolaus, and why Nicolaus baptized the children.
Here's the geographical information that I've been able to glean from the records:
I believe the birth records are from the town of Worobijowka, which is now located in Ukraine and is known as Vorobiivka.
The town in which Nicolaus is listed as a priest is Jezierna, which is also located in modern day Ukraine and is known as Ozerna. Since my original post, I've discovered additional birth records for children of Maximilanus and Julianna and in those records the priest who baptized the children was not Nicolaus, but a different priest from the town/parish of Isypowce. Isypowce is also in modern day Ukraine and is known as Vysypivtsi . All three towns are in the Tarnopol district I believe.
Hope this helps!
Jeff


Hi Jeff,

Thanks for the geographical information. The data in the records which should help narrow down the village where Maximilian & his family lived is usually found at the top of the page and would usually appear as “Pro Pago…” (For the village of…). They lived in house #36 in the named village. He was pastor and administrator in Kurowce and Cebrów. According to the Słownik geograficzny, which is the go to source for info regarding places in the 19th Century, both Kurowce and Cebrów were villages which belonged to the parish of Worobijówka. Of the places named in the records Tarnopol was the largest and was a town/small city. Jezierna was the next largest and was a miasteczko (small city/town). At some point during the 19th Century it was a stop on therailway line. All the other places were villages. Here is the link to the Słownik geograficzny for Jezierna: http://dir.icm.edu.pl/pl/Slownik_geograficzny/Tom_III/570 In 1881 Jezierna had a population of 1386 Roman/Latin Rite Catholics and 1900 Greek/Eastern Rite Catholics. Since Nicholas/Mikolaj Strzelbicki was the pastor there as well as a dean he would have been rather high up in the hierarchy of Greek Catholic priests in the Greek Catholic Archdiocese of Lwów (Lviv).

I have difficulty understanding the organizational structure of the Greek Catholic parishes. Maximilian is named as the pastor in Kurowce but that village was part of the parish of Worobijówka. Does that all mean that he was pastor of Kurowce (and Cebrów) while living in Worobijówka or was he living in Kurowce? Was he an assistant priest to the pastor of Worobijówka who was in charge of the Greek Catholics in Kurowce? And where was house 36 where he lived with his family?
Attached is a 19th Century maps of Galicia. It is not sufficiently detailed to show all the villages but does show Lwów, Tarnopol and Jezierna.

The entry for Nicholas/Mikołaj is longer and more detailed than that of his brother Leo/Leon due to the circumstances of his birth. When he was born he was in distress and in danger of death and thus he was baptized with water by in an abbreviated rite by Rev. S. Kaczala in December, 1842. He survived the danger and was brought to church in January, 1843 where all the ceremonies surrounding the pouring of holy water with the words of the baptismal formula were added by his maternal grandfather. His grandfather did not baptize him but completed the ceremonies and confirmed him. His brother’s birth & baptism was a normal standard issue record.

Since marriages took place in the parish of the bride, the parish where Julianna’s father was pastor should be where the marriage of Maximilian & Julianna took place.

First names are translated into their English form and then their Polish form. The translations follow.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Wishing you continued successful research,

Dave


Here is the baptism of Nicholas/Mikołaj Plato.

Col. 1: Series = Number in Order: Missing

Col. 2: Mensis = Month: December 1842

Col. 2a: Natus = Of Birth: December 1, 1842

Col. 2b: Baptisat. = Of Baptism: December 1, 1842

Col. 3: Numerus Domus = House Number: 36

Col. 4: Nomen = Name (of person baptized): Nicholas/Mikołaj Plato two names (i.e. first & middle name)

Col. 4: Religio = Religion
Col. 4a: Catholica = Catholic: Checked
Col. 4b: Aut alia = Or another: Blank

Col. 5: Sexus = Gender
Col. 5a: Puer = Boy: Checked
Col. 5b: Puella = Girl: Blank

Col. 6: Thori = Bed
Col. 6a. Legitimi = Legitimate: Checked
Col. 6b: Illegitimi = Illegitimate: Blank

Col. 7: Parentes = Parents (Cols. 7a & 7b flow together)
Col. 7a: Nomen = Name: Maximilian/Maksymilian Lewicki, Greek Rite Catholic pastor in Kurowce and Julianna, born of the Honorable and Reverend Nicholas/Mikolaj Strzelbicki, dean of Kozłowiak, pastor in Jezierna
Col. 7b: Conditio = State of Life/Occupation

Col. 8a: Patrini = Sponsors and their State of Life/Occupation: (Cols. 8a &8b flow together) Reverend Roman Czyrowski, administrator of the parish of Dotzconka, and Julianna Dąbrowicka, the wife of Reverend Gregory?Grzegorz Dąbrowicki, pastor of Htut???, Pan Felix/Feliks Ocharski, representative of Pan Kur??? and Thecla/Tekla Czrowska, the wife of Reverend Roman Czyrowski, administrator of the parish of Dotzconka
Col. 8b: Conditio = State of Life/Occupation

Note in Cols. 1-6b: Born and baptized with water on the same day by Reverend Stephen/Stefan Kaczała, assistant pastor in Jezdr????

Note in Cols. 1-7b: On the 22nd day of January, 1843 the Honorable Reverend Nicholas/Mikolaj Strzelbicki, pastor in Jezierna and dean of Kozłowiak, supplied the ceremonies of Baptism and Confirmed (him).

Note in Cols. 4-7b: The midwife was Maria Oszaniec from ?erbe Tarnopol


Here is the birth & baptism of Leo/Leon Theodore/Teodor:

Col. 1: Series = Number in Order: Missing

Col. 2: Mensis = Month: February

Col. 2a: Natus = Of Birth: February 21

Col. 2b: Baptisat. = Of Baptism: February 21

Col. 3: Numerus Domus = House Number: 36

Col. 4: Nomen = Name (of person baptized): Leo/Leon Theodore/Teodor two names (i.e. first & middle name)

Col. 4: Religio = Religion
Col. 4a: Catholica = Catholic: Checked
Col. 4b: Aut alia = Or another: Blank

Col. 5: Sexus = Gender
Col. 5a: Puer = Boy: Checked
Col. 5b: Puella = Girl: Blank

Col. 6: Thori = Bed
Col. 6a. Legitimi = Legitimate: Checked
Col. 6b: Illegitimi = Illegitimate: Blank

Col. 7: Parentes = Parents
Col. 7a: Nomen = Name: Maximilian/Maksymilian Lewicki (and) Julianna, the legitimate daughter of the Honorable and Reverend Nicholas/Mikolaj Strzelbicki, pastor in Jezierna (and) dean of ?rzczan???
Col. 7b: Conditio = State of Life/Occupation: Administrator in Kurowce and Cebrów.

Col. 8a: Patrini = Sponsors and their State of Life/Occupation: Stephen/Stefan Andykowicz (and) Julianna Dąbrowicka
Col. 8b: Conditio = State of Life/Occupation: Parish administrator of Hladk?; wife of Reverend Gregory/Grzegorz Dąbrowicki, pastor of Hłuboczka

Note in Cols. 1-6b: I, Nicholas/Mikolaj Strzelbicki, pastor in Jezcina (and) dean of ?rzczan??? baptized and confirmed (him).

Note in Cols. 3-7a: The examined* midwife was Thecla/Tekla Kołodynska

Note: *The examined midwife: Two classes of midwives practiced in Galicia at that time, examined/approved and non-examined/approved. It appears that being examined/approved would equal being licensed in our terminology.



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adame24



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Post Posted: Fri Nov 26, 2021 2:35 pm      Post subject: Translation Request
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Hello,

Can I please request a translation/decipher of the 2nd line of this baptism register. I just am looking for a reading of the parents and grandparents listed.

The child is Thecla (Tekla) Dziedzic
Born: 8 September 1839

Father: Jacob ... Son of ______ and _______
Mother: Agnes ? Daughter of Valentine and _________?

Thank you,



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Fri Nov 26, 2021 8:04 pm      Post subject: Re: Translation Request
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adame24 wrote:
Hello,

Can I please request a translation/decipher of the 2nd line of this baptism register. I just am looking for a reading of the parents and grandparents listed.

The child is Thecla (Tekla) Dziedzic
Born: 8 September 1839

Father: Jacob ... Son of ______ and _______
Mother: Agnes ? Daughter of Valentine and _________?

Thank you,


Salve (Hi),

The father is Jakub (Polish) or Jacob/James (English) Dziedzic born of Kacper/Kaspar (Polish) or Casper (English) and Agnieszka (Polish) or Agnes (English).

The mother is Agnieszka (Polish) or Agnes (English) Czech born of Walenty (Polish) or Valentine (English) and Magdalena (Polish) or Magdalene (English).

Here is an explanation of the Latin text. The names of the father and the mother are in the Nominative case. The names of the paternal and maternal grandparents are in the Ablative Case because they follow the preposition “ex” which governs the Ablative. (Usually the names of the grandparents are entered in the Genitive Case, but not in this entry.) Here is the transcription of the Latin text: Jacobus ex Gasparo et Agnete Dziedzic natus; Agnes ex Valentino et Magdalena Czech nata. Latin given names are found in the First, Second, and Third Declensions, which explains why all the names in the text do not have the same endings. Magdalena is a First Declension noun and the Ablative form is Magdalena (the same as the Nominative). Jacobus, Gasparus, and Valentinus are Second Declension nouns and “us”/”er” is the Nominative Case form; “o” is the Ablative ending and thus Gasparo and Valentino are in the Ablative. Agnes is a Third Declension noun. Third Declension nouns are a bit more tricky than First or Second Declension nouns in that the Nominative varies and the Genitive often is quite different from the Nominative. Latin dictionaries list nouns in the Nominative followed by the Genitive and the Gender. The Genitive is important because the stem of the noun is obtained by dropping the Genitive ending and all the other case endings are added to the stem of the noun. Agnes is the Nominative and Agnetis is the Genitive. The stem is obtained by dropping the Genitive ending (“is”) and thus the stem is Agnet to which the Ablative ending (“e”) is added which results in Agnete, the form found in the record. Finally, we have the Perfect Passive Participles—natus and nata—which are in the Nominative and thus modify Jacobus and Anges, which are also in the Nominative and thus the surnames Dziedzic and Czech are the surnames of the father and the mother and not the maiden names of the grandmothers.

I hope this explanation provides the answers you sought and, perhaps, may be of use to you in the future.

Vale (Be well/goodby),

Dave
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MPolanski



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Post Posted: Fri Nov 26, 2021 9:46 pm      Post subject: Opinion Please
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Hi Dave,

I don't need a translation as I read all, yes all, 217 pages of your translations and took copious notes. Thank you for all that information. I would like to know if you have seen anything like the attached record. It is the last entry on the right-hand side of the page. The number in series is correct. The dates of the last entry are earlier than the dates of the penultimate entry. There appear to be two birth dates and two baptismal dates for only one boy child. Am I misreading this? Then Joannes is crossed out and Michael is left. Father's name is Stanislaus Polanski. Two years later a Michael is crossed out and a Joannes is left to the same parents. I haven't seen many Apolinias in this village so I'm guessing the midwife is the child's paternal grandmother and yet there is still this name confusion if that is what it is. Any insight you might be able to provide would be most welcome. These aren't the only changes on this page. The second entry has two names crossed out.

Thanks,

Malu



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adame24



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Post Posted: Fri Nov 26, 2021 11:24 pm      Post subject: Re: Translation Request
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dnowicki wrote:
adame24 wrote:
Hello,

Can I please request a translation/decipher of the 2nd line of this baptism register. I just am looking for a reading of the parents and grandparents listed.

The child is Thecla (Tekla) Dziedzic
Born: 8 September 1839

Father: Jacob ... Son of ______ and _______
Mother: Agnes ? Daughter of Valentine and _________?

Thank you,


Salve (Hi),

The father is Jakub (Polish) or Jacob/James (English) Dziedzic born of Kacper/Kaspar (Polish) or Casper (English) and Agnieszka (Polish) or Agnes (English).

The mother is Agnieszka (Polish) or Agnes (English) Czech born of Walenty (Polish) or Valentine (English) and Magdalena (Polish) or Magdalene (English).

Here is an explanation of the Latin text. The names of the father and the mother are in the Nominative case. The names of the paternal and maternal grandparents are in the Ablative Case because they follow the preposition “ex” which governs the Ablative. (Usually the names of the grandparents are entered in the Genitive Case, but not in this entry.) Here is the transcription of the Latin text: Jacobus ex Gasparo et Agnete Dziedzic natus; Agnes ex Valentino et Magdalena Czech nata. Latin given names are found in the First, Second, and Third Declensions, which explains why all the names in the text do not have the same endings. Magdalena is a First Declension noun and the Ablative form is Magdalena (the same as the Nominative). Jacobus, Gasparus, and Valentinus are Second Declension nouns and “us”/”er” is the Nominative Case form; “o” is the Ablative ending and thus Gasparo and Valentino are in the Ablative. Agnes is a Third Declension noun. Third Declension nouns are a bit more tricky than First or Second Declension nouns in that the Nominative varies and the Genitive often is quite different from the Nominative. Latin dictionaries list nouns in the Nominative followed by the Genitive and the Gender. The Genitive is important because the stem of the noun is obtained by dropping the Genitive ending and all the other case endings are added to the stem of the noun. Agnes is the Nominative and Agnetis is the Genitive. The stem is obtained by dropping the Genitive ending (“is”) and thus the stem is Agnet to which the Ablative ending (“e”) is added which results in Agnete, the form found in the record. Finally, we have the Perfect Passive Participles—natus and nata—which are in the Nominative and thus modify Jacobus and Anges, which are also in the Nominative and thus the surnames Dziedzic and Czech are the surnames of the father and the mother and not the maiden names of the grandmothers.

I hope this explanation provides the answers you sought and, perhaps, may be of use to you in the future.

Vale (Be well/goodby),

Dave


Dave,

Thank you very much sir. That is a great bit of information to improve my understanding Latin. Appreciate all that you do.
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Fri Nov 26, 2021 11:48 pm      Post subject: Re: Opinion Please
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MPolanski wrote:
Hi Dave,

I don't need a translation as I read all, yes all, 217 pages of your translations and took copious notes. Thank you for all that information. I would like to know if you have seen anything like the attached record. It is the last entry on the right-hand side of the page. The number in series is correct. The dates of the last entry are earlier than the dates of the penultimate entry. There appear to be two birth dates and two baptismal dates for only one boy child. Am I misreading this? Then Joannes is crossed out and Michael is left. Father's name is Stanislaus Polanski. Two years later a Michael is crossed out and a Joannes is left to the same parents. I haven't seen many Apolinias in this village so I'm guessing the midwife is the child's paternal grandmother and yet there is still this name confusion if that is what it is. Any insight you might be able to provide would be most welcome. These aren't the only changes on this page. The second entry has two names crossed out.

Thanks,

Malu


Hi Malu,

That is one heck of a lot of reading! You certainly must have been a diligent and excellent student in your school days.

I’ve seen similar records. The scribe didn’t do a great job on the page—in the second entry (#23) it appears that the original name was Michael, which was crossed out. Then Bartalomaeus was entered and crossed out and the only name not crossed out was Joannes.

I believe that the date issue can be resolved by reading 9/9 & 15/9 as day/month. He was born on September 9 and baptized on September 15. The fact that the month is written in longhand above that data makes for a redundant record, but that is no big deal. By reading the dates as I suggest the entries on the page remain in order of the day the baptism took place. The first two entries on the page (#22 & #23) are for the month of August and the next two (#24 & #25) are for the month of September and since the order depends on the date of baptism rather than the date of birth the order of the entries is fine. Your thoughts about the midwife being the child’s paternal grandmother makes sense but without strict proof.

It appears that the image came from Family Search and if you would share the name of the parish and the film link there are most likely a few additional comments I could offer which may help to explain things.

Since I’m about ready to head off to the Land of Nod further comments will have to wait until tomorrow.

Thanks.

Dave
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MPolanski



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Post Posted: Sat Nov 27, 2021 11:05 am      Post subject: Re: Opinion Please
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dnowicki wrote:
MPolanski wrote:
Hi Dave,

I don't need a translation as I read all, yes all, 217 pages of your translations and took copious notes. Thank you for all that information. I would like to know if you have seen anything like the attached record. It is the last entry on the right-hand side of the page. The number in series is correct. The dates of the last entry are earlier than the dates of the penultimate entry. There appear to be two birth dates and two baptismal dates for only one boy child. Am I misreading this? Then Joannes is crossed out and Michael is left. Father's name is Stanislaus Polanski. Two years later a Michael is crossed out and a Joannes is left to the same parents. I haven't seen many Apolinias in this village so I'm guessing the midwife is the child's paternal grandmother and yet there is still this name confusion if that is what it is. Any insight you might be able to provide would be most welcome. These aren't the only changes on this page. The second entry has two names crossed out.

Thanks,

Malu


Hi Malu,

That is one heck of a lot of reading! You certainly must have been a diligent and excellent student in your school days.

I’ve seen similar records. The scribe didn’t do a great job on the page—in the second entry (#23) it appears that the original name was Michael, which was crossed out. Then Bartalomaeus was entered and crossed out and the only name not crossed out was Joannes.

I believe that the date issue can be resolved by reading 9/9 & 15/9 as day/month. He was born on September 9 and baptized on September 15. The fact that the month is written in longhand above that data makes for a redundant record, but that is no big deal. By reading the dates as I suggest the entries on the page remain in order of the day the baptism took place. The first two entries on the page (#22 & #23) are for the month of August and the next two (#24 & #25) are for the month of September and since the order depends on the date of baptism rather than the date of birth the order of the entries is fine. Your thoughts about the midwife being the child’s paternal grandmother makes sense but without strict proof.

It appears that the image came from Family Search and if you would share the name of the parish and the film link there are most likely a few additional comments I could offer which may help to explain things.

Since I’m about ready to head off to the Land of Nod further comments will have to wait until tomorrow.

Thanks.

Dave


Hi Dave,

I thought you could supply some words of wisdom.

You are right that these images are from Family Search. The town is Krużlowa Wyżnia in Galicia. Unfortunately these records have not yet been made available even at a Family History Center. Luckily I found the birth date on a Family Search tree. With the birth date, I was able to request the scan from Salt Lake City. The link for the record reference is https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/817479?availability=Family%20History%20Library. On that page, it states the records from the Tarnow Roman Catholic Diocese Church Books are available online. However, if you scroll down you can see the records from the Krużlowa's are presently only available in Salt Lake City.

It also makes sense that these errors may have been made in copying the original records rather than in those records themselves. A possibility that hadn't occurred to me.

Thanks,

Malu
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MICHIGAN



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Post Posted: Mon Nov 29, 2021 9:11 pm      Post subject: Decipher - Help
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Hello,

Can I please request someone help decipher the names of the two attached records parents and grandparents? I've started below but could use a boost. Thank you very much for your help.

1863 - Josephus / Jozef
Father: Martinus Adamczyk son of Jacobi and Francisca _______?
Mother: Victoria Mozdzen daughter of Laurentius and Catharina Dudek?

1868 - Catharina / Katarzyna
Father: Martinus son of Andrea Potocki and __________ Krawczyk?
Mother: Josepha daughter of __________________



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Post Posted: Tue Nov 30, 2021 5:52 am      Post subject: Re: Decipher - Help
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MICHIGAN wrote:
Hello,

Can I please request someone help decipher the names of the two attached records parents and grandparents? I've started below but could use a boost. Thank you very much for your help.

1863 - Josephus / Jozef
Father: Martinus Adamczyk son of Jacobi and Francisca _______?
Mother: Victoria Mozdzen daughter of Laurentius and Catharina Dudek?

1868 - Catharina / Katarzyna
Father: Martinus son of Andrea Potocki and __________ Krawczyk?
Mother: Josepha daughter of __________________


Hi Michigan,

Here is a transcription of the Latin in the 1863 baptismal record of Józef: The father: Martinus Adamczyk hortulanus* filius Jacobi et Franciscae Brzyski
& the mother: Victoria Możdzeń filia Laurentii cmetonis** et Catharinae Dudek.

The translation: The father: Marcin Adamczyk, a gardener, the son of Jakub and of Franciszka (née) Brzyski
& the mother: Wiktoria Możdzeń, the daughter of Wawrzyniec, a kmiec** and of Katarzyna Dudek.

It is also worth noting that Józef died in 1922 on the 18th of what looks like February (18/2 1922). The month depends on how one reads the second numeral, which is not exactly clear.

Here is the transcription of the 1868 baptismal record of Katarzyna: The father: Martinus ex Andrea Potocki casario*** et Justina Krawczyk
& the mother: Josepha ex Michaele Kolarz cmetonis** et Anna ignoti cognominis.

The translation: The father: Marcin (born) from/of Andrzej Potocki, a cottager*** and from/of Justina Krawczyk
& the mother: Józefa (born) from/of Michał Kolarz and from/of Anna of an unknown (maiden) surname.

Notes: *hortulanus/gardener: a term specifying the social/economic status of a peasant as a person who had his own cottage and sufficient land for a garden and possibly some farm animals but fields for crops. The Polish version of the term would be ogrodnik or zagrodnik.
**cmetonis/kmiec: a peasant at the top of the social/economic hierarchy of peasants who had sufficient land (fields) to be self-sustaining. The Polish version of cmeto/cmetho is kmiec.
***casario/cottager: a peasant who had his own cottage. The Polish version is chałupnik. (Casarius is one of several Latin synonyms for a cottager/chałupnik.

I translated the given names into their Polish form. Attached is a PDF list of some common Latin given names with their Polish and English versions. Perhaps you may find it useful in future research.

Wishing you success in your research,

Dave



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Magroski49
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Post Posted: Wed Dec 01, 2021 9:52 am      Post subject:
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Hi, Dave

I have a rough idead of what is written, though I would appreciate the details.
More than 140 names of people who died of cholera were ommitted in this book.
I see something about a civil book being mentioned.
Thanks in advance,
Giberto



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: 7 Days ago at 5:01 pm      Post subject:
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Magroski49 wrote:
Hi, Dave

I have a rough idead of what is written, though I would appreciate the details.
More than 140 names of people who died of cholera were ommitted in this book.
I see something about a civil book being mentioned.
Thanks in advance,
Giberto


Hi Gilberto,

I presume that this record is from near Nieszawa. From this record alone one cannot say how widespread the cholera epidemic was that year but it certainly had a major impact on the local population. What is the year of the entry?

It is interesting and probably historically important for the region.

Here follows the translation.

Dave

Translation: Others who died of the disease of cholera*, since they were buried in private places** by private individuals were not actually in a sacred/holy***place (and) were inscribed in civil registers, here are omitted to the month of October.

Notes: * cholera: most likely Asiatic Cholera, a highly contagious form of cholera which was usually fatal.
**in locis privatis/in private places, i.e. not in a regular cemetery.
***non vero in loco sacro/not actually in a holy/place, i.e. not in consecrated ground. In parish cemeteries the entire cemetery was blessed/consecrated. If an individual (usually a member of the gentry/szlachta) was buried in a tomb on an estate that grave or those graves were blessed by a priest. In this entry it would appear that a large number of those who died in the epidemic were quickly buried wherever it was convenient without a religious ceremony conducted by a member of the clergy. It is probable that the warm weather at that time of the year, late summer to early autumn, meant that it was not practical to delay the burial of those who had died of the disease.
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Magroski49
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Post Posted: 7 Days ago at 6:47 am      Post subject:
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Hi Gilberto,

I presume that this record is from near Nieszawa. From this record alone one cannot say how widespread the cholera epidemic was that year but it certainly had a major impact on the local population. What is the year of the entry?

It is interesting and probably historically important for the region.

Here follows the translation.

Dave

Translation: Others who died of the disease of cholera*, since they were buried in private places** by private individuals were not actually in a sacred/holy***place (and) were inscribed in civil registers, here are omitted to the month of October.

Notes: * cholera: most likely Asiatic Cholera, a highly contagious form of cholera which was usually fatal.
**in locis privatis/in private places, i.e. not in a regular cemetery.
***non vero in loco sacro/not actually in a holy/place, i.e. not in consecrated ground. In parish cemeteries the entire cemetery was blessed/consecrated. If an individual (usually a member of the gentry/szlachta) was buried in a tomb on an estate that grave or those graves were blessed by a priest. In this entry it would appear that a large number of those who died in the epidemic were quickly buried wherever it was convenient without a religious ceremony conducted by a member of the clergy. It is probable that the warm weather at that time of the year, late summer to early autumn, meant that it was not practical to delay the burial of those who had died of the disease.[/quote]

Dave,

I am sorry I forgot to tell you the year. It was in 1831, in Raciązek.
It made curious why all names of the deceased were written in a book (polish language, long paragraph) and not written in this one (latin language, shor paragraph).

Thank you
Gilberto
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: 6 Days ago at 11:19 pm      Post subject:
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Magroski49 wrote:
Hi Gilberto,

I presume that this record is from near Nieszawa. From this record alone one cannot say how widespread the cholera epidemic was that year but it certainly had a major impact on the local population. What is the year of the entry?

It is interesting and probably historically important for the region.

Here follows the translation.

Dave

Translation: Others who died of the disease of cholera*, since they were buried in private places** by private individuals were not actually in a sacred/holy***place (and) were inscribed in civil registers, here are omitted to the month of October.

Notes: * cholera: most likely Asiatic Cholera, a highly contagious form of cholera which was usually fatal.
**in locis privatis/in private places, i.e. not in a regular cemetery.
***non vero in loco sacro/not actually in a holy/place, i.e. not in consecrated ground. In parish cemeteries the entire cemetery was blessed/consecrated. If an individual (usually a member of the gentry/szlachta) was buried in a tomb on an estate that grave or those graves were blessed by a priest. In this entry it would appear that a large number of those who died in the epidemic were quickly buried wherever it was convenient without a religious ceremony conducted by a member of the clergy. It is probable that the warm weather at that time of the year, late summer to early autumn, meant that it was not practical to delay the burial of those who had died of the disease.


Dave,

I am sorry I forgot to tell you the year. It was in 1831, in Raciązek.
It made curious why all names of the deceased were written in a book (polish language, long paragraph) and not written in this one (latin language, shor paragraph).

Thank you
Gilberto[/quote]

Hi Gilberto,

Thanks for the additional information. It helps to put the record into perspective. The deaths from cholera in 1831 was not just a local event and it was connected to other events which were very significant in the history of the Congress Kingdom of Poland. The cholera outbreak was part of a global cholera pandemic. Historians believe that the outbreak began in India and crossed the Urals into Russia, from which it spread to Poland, Western Europe, the British Isles and then to the Americas. The spread of the disease from Russia to Poland was closely tied to the political events of 1830-31. An uprising began in Warsaw led by cadets of the military school for officers which spread to other areas of Russian Poland. Ultimately the unsuccessful insurrection was put down by Russian troops sent into Poland. The conflict is known by various titles including “The Cadets Uprising” and the “Polish-Russian War”, “The November Insurrection”. It is believed that the Russian troops brought cholera to Poland as they were deployed in the Congress Kingdom to put down the insurrection. The government setup by the insurrectionists moved west to Płock and eventually the troops crossed into The Grand Duchy of Posen. The war ended with surrender of the remnants of the Polish forces at Brodnica. Hence the cholera connection to Raciązek, probably brought to the area by the Russian troops.

I believe that the answer to why the names were entered into the long paragraph style civil transcripts and not in the short paragraph Latin records lies in the nature of the two types of records. The pastor of Raciązek was responsible for both records but the short paragraph Latin records were composed when he acted in the role of parish priest whereas the long paragraph Polish records were composed when he acted in the role of civil registrar. Each type of record had its own purpose—one secular and the other religious. The priest was required to enter all deaths reported in the civil register whereas he entered only the burials which were accompanied by the religious rites of Christian burial into the church burial register. Since the entry states that the omitted burials were conducted by private individuals in private places they were not considered rites of Christian burial to be entered into the church burial register. It is important to keep in mind that the parish registers in Latin focused on baptisms rather than births and on burials rather than deaths—hence entries, especially those from the 18th Century regularly only recorded the date of baptism and not the date of birth and the date of burial and not the date of death. (Marriage records, of course, recorded that date when the marriage rite took place.) Conversely, the civil records concentrated on the birth of a child and only mentioned the baptism as a kind of addendum, if the priest wanted to include the names of the godparents. Civil death records recorded the date and place of death but not the cause of death or the date of burial.

In my opinion, having the same person act as a religious functionary and as a civil bureaucrat is awkward at best. This acting as a dual functionary is responsible for many of the fictions found in the civil records, e.g. when the civil record states that the witnesses informed the registrar that a religious marriage had taken place the witnesses were not telling him anything he didn’t already know since he had officiated at the religious wedding ceremony—pure legal fiction. The same holds true of the ending of death records with the eyewitness belief statement. Of course the priest knew the individual had died. Most likely he had prepared the individual for death with the so called “Last Rites” and he had celebrated the religious burial rites. Again, he obviously knew about the death in his religious role and that he was convinced that the person had died was a legal fiction required in his role as a civil registrar.

All in all, by reading between the lines of a religious record one can deduce the approximate date of birth of a child—usually within a day or two before the baptism and sometimes on the same day as the baptism. The same holds true for burial records. By reading between the lines of a civil record one can deduce the date of baptism (usually the date the entry was made) and the date of burial (usually the date the record was composed).

I hope that the above explanations provide background to the records and help to resolve your curiosity.

All the best,

Dave
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