PolishOrigins Forum

 FAQFAQ    SearchSearch    MemberlistMemberlist    ProfileProfile    Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages    Log inLog in    RegisterRegister 
Latin records translations
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222  Next
Author
Message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Thu Dec 02, 2021 11:19 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Magroski49 wrote:
Hi Gilberto,

I presume that this record is from near Nieszawa. From this record alone one cannot say how widespread the cholera epidemic was that year but it certainly had a major impact on the local population. What is the year of the entry?

It is interesting and probably historically important for the region.

Here follows the translation.

Dave

Translation: Others who died of the disease of cholera*, since they were buried in private places** by private individuals were not actually in a sacred/holy***place (and) were inscribed in civil registers, here are omitted to the month of October.

Notes: * cholera: most likely Asiatic Cholera, a highly contagious form of cholera which was usually fatal.
**in locis privatis/in private places, i.e. not in a regular cemetery.
***non vero in loco sacro/not actually in a holy/place, i.e. not in consecrated ground. In parish cemeteries the entire cemetery was blessed/consecrated. If an individual (usually a member of the gentry/szlachta) was buried in a tomb on an estate that grave or those graves were blessed by a priest. In this entry it would appear that a large number of those who died in the epidemic were quickly buried wherever it was convenient without a religious ceremony conducted by a member of the clergy. It is probable that the warm weather at that time of the year, late summer to early autumn, meant that it was not practical to delay the burial of those who had died of the disease.


Dave,

I am sorry I forgot to tell you the year. It was in 1831, in Raciązek.
It made curious why all names of the deceased were written in a book (polish language, long paragraph) and not written in this one (latin language, shor paragraph).

Thank you
Gilberto[/quote]

Hi Gilberto,

Thanks for the additional information. It helps to put the record into perspective. The deaths from cholera in 1831 was not just a local event and it was connected to other events which were very significant in the history of the Congress Kingdom of Poland. The cholera outbreak was part of a global cholera pandemic. Historians believe that the outbreak began in India and crossed the Urals into Russia, from which it spread to Poland, Western Europe, the British Isles and then to the Americas. The spread of the disease from Russia to Poland was closely tied to the political events of 1830-31. An uprising began in Warsaw led by cadets of the military school for officers which spread to other areas of Russian Poland. Ultimately the unsuccessful insurrection was put down by Russian troops sent into Poland. The conflict is known by various titles including “The Cadets Uprising” and the “Polish-Russian War”, “The November Insurrection”. It is believed that the Russian troops brought cholera to Poland as they were deployed in the Congress Kingdom to put down the insurrection. The government setup by the insurrectionists moved west to Płock and eventually the troops crossed into The Grand Duchy of Posen. The war ended with surrender of the remnants of the Polish forces at Brodnica. Hence the cholera connection to Raciązek, probably brought to the area by the Russian troops.

I believe that the answer to why the names were entered into the long paragraph style civil transcripts and not in the short paragraph Latin records lies in the nature of the two types of records. The pastor of Raciązek was responsible for both records but the short paragraph Latin records were composed when he acted in the role of parish priest whereas the long paragraph Polish records were composed when he acted in the role of civil registrar. Each type of record had its own purpose—one secular and the other religious. The priest was required to enter all deaths reported in the civil register whereas he entered only the burials which were accompanied by the religious rites of Christian burial into the church burial register. Since the entry states that the omitted burials were conducted by private individuals in private places they were not considered rites of Christian burial to be entered into the church burial register. It is important to keep in mind that the parish registers in Latin focused on baptisms rather than births and on burials rather than deaths—hence entries, especially those from the 18th Century regularly only recorded the date of baptism and not the date of birth and the date of burial and not the date of death. (Marriage records, of course, recorded that date when the marriage rite took place.) Conversely, the civil records concentrated on the birth of a child and only mentioned the baptism as a kind of addendum, if the priest wanted to include the names of the godparents. Civil death records recorded the date and place of death but not the cause of death or the date of burial.

In my opinion, having the same person act as a religious functionary and as a civil bureaucrat is awkward at best. This acting as a dual functionary is responsible for many of the fictions found in the civil records, e.g. when the civil record states that the witnesses informed the registrar that a religious marriage had taken place the witnesses were not telling him anything he didn’t already know since he had officiated at the religious wedding ceremony—pure legal fiction. The same holds true of the ending of death records with the eyewitness belief statement. Of course the priest knew the individual had died. Most likely he had prepared the individual for death with the so called “Last Rites” and he had celebrated the religious burial rites. Again, he obviously knew about the death in his religious role and that he was convinced that the person had died was a legal fiction required in his role as a civil registrar.

All in all, by reading between the lines of a religious record one can deduce the approximate date of birth of a child—usually within a day or two before the baptism and sometimes on the same day as the baptism. The same holds true for burial records. By reading between the lines of a civil record one can deduce the date of baptism (usually the date the entry was made) and the date of burial (usually the date the record was composed).

I hope that the above explanations provide background to the records and help to resolve your curiosity.

All the best,

Dave
View user's profile
Send private message
TedMack



Joined: 12 Jun 2020
Replies: 218
Location: Sydney, Australia

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Dec 04, 2021 1:08 am      Post subject: Latin Record Translation
Reply with quote

G'day Dave

I was hoping you could please translate the attached death record for my 4x GGF from the Rychnow parish - I've attached the whole page and a crop of the relevant record (record 14 of 1814).

Cheers



Death Ignacy Halka - record 14 (1).jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  979.06 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

Death Ignacy Halka - record 14 (1).jpg



Death Ignacy Halka - record 14 (2).jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  86.41 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

Death Ignacy Halka - record 14 (2).jpg


View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Dec 04, 2021 12:16 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin Record Translation
Reply with quote

TedMack wrote:
G'day Dave

I was hoping you could please translate the attached death record for my 4x GGF from the Rychnow parish - I've attached the whole page and a crop of the relevant record (record 14 of 1814).

Cheers


Hi Ted,

The priest had some round about ways of stating facts (i.e. the date of death). He died of bleeding but what caused the bleeding is not recorded. Anyway, the translation follows.

Wishing you successful research,

Dave

Translation:
Col. 1: Number for the year 1814: 14
Col. 2: Date of Burial: 14 November
Col. 3: Body of entry: Rychnów. Ignacy Halka, age 60, was buried in the cemetery of the parish church towards the South. After he had been fortified by the Sacraments* he died on the third day before (his) burial at the hour of 12 at night**.
Col. 4: Age of the one buried: 60
Col. 5: Gender
Col. 5A: male: Checked
Col. 5B: female: Blank
Col. 6: Cause of Death: Fluens Sanguinis = Flowing Blood

Notes: *Fortified by the Sacraments: Confession, Communion and Extreme Unction aka Anointing of the Sick, collectively known as "The Last Rites".

**12 at night i.e. Midnight
View user's profile
Send private message
j_lex



Joined: 06 Feb 2021
Replies: 35
Location: Buffalo, NY

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Dec 04, 2021 3:12 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Hi Dave,
I have a few questions on the following baptisms.

Przybranowo 1798_sadowkich_zofia
The first half seems fairly straight forward; Baptism in Przybranowo on 22 April 1798 of legitimate infant Zofia born 18 Apr to Jan and Magdalena Sadwskich. The second half, starting with --Patrim, I am uncertain but may be listing godparents.

Kawęczyn 1801_Laks_Boguslaw
Similar situation to the first baptism. Is it safe to assume that this Kawęczyn is roughly 20km east of Torun? Baptism in Kawęczyn on 25 May 1801 of infant named Boguslaw, son of Boguslaw Jan and Dorota Lax. Family may include Joachimus Biatkowski of Kawęczyn and Marianna Kaminishka of Grabe and Joanna Biatkowska of Kawęczyn.
Is there significance to the HH before Boguslaw Jan (more distinct in the second version)?
And is there relevance to the faint portion at the bottom, which may be in Polish. I can ask on the page is that is better.

Thanks again!
-J



1801_Lax_Boguslaw.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  459.29 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

1801_Lax_Boguslaw.jpg



1801_Laks_Boguslaw.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  507.02 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

1801_Laks_Boguslaw.jpg



1798_sadowkich_zofia.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  493.32 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

1798_sadowkich_zofia.jpg


View user's profile
Send private message
zolkie



Joined: 26 Feb 2009
Replies: 58
Location: Maryland, USA

Back to top
Post Posted: Sat Dec 04, 2021 7:15 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

This one is a bit challenging because I'm having trouble with both the handwriting and the abbreviations.
Here's my attempt:

Groom: Nicolaus son of Josephi Damaszak? and Maria Krasowska...the rest is gibberish
Bride: Alexandra daughter of p.d. (deceased?) Alexander Hulinska (why wouldn't this be Hulinski?) and Anasobobil? R.d.i. Stefani Lewicki....and I can't make out the last word

I know that's not much, I appreciate the help!

Regards,
Jeff



IMG_6458.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  1.78 MB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

IMG_6458.jpg


View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Dec 05, 2021 4:07 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

zolkie wrote:
This one is a bit challenging because I'm having trouble with both the handwriting and the abbreviations.
Here's my attempt:

Groom: Nicolaus son of Josephi Damaszak? and Maria Krasowska...the rest is gibberish
Bride: Alexandra daughter of p.d. (deceased?) Alexander Hulinska (why wouldn't this be Hulinski?) and Anasobobil? R.d.i. Stefani Lewicki....and I can't make out the last word

I know that's not much, I appreciate the help!

Regards,
Jeff


Hi Jeff,

Yes, much of what is written comes out as gibberish. It is as if the priest was entering info in a stream of consciousness form. Data appears mixed with neither rhyme nor reason and then, of course, the pennmanship doesn’t help. I’m not certain that my reading of all the surnames is correct, but what you see as Hulinska (an adjective) I see as Hulanka (a noun meaning “reveler”). Anyway, here how I read the entries.

Groom: Mikołaj/Nicholas son of Józef/Joseph Adamarszak (same surname as that of the first witness) and Maria Krasowska, town residents from house number 361 of the village

Bride: Aleksandra/Alexandra daughter of the late Aleksander/Alexander Hulanka and Anna/Anne Sobol (? I can’t read the final letter/letters), town residents

Witnesses: Józef/Joseph Dziedzic & Franciszek/Francis Adamarszak, townsmen

The Gibberish (mostly legalities): Both Rev. Stefan/Stephen Lewicki and ?o??enski, the pastor, blessed (the marriage). The expressed consent of the father of the groom, who was present, (was given); for the bride consent of the orphans & minors court (instantia pupillaris) was given on 28 December, 1861, Number 983.

I hope this helps.

Dave
View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Dec 05, 2021 4:09 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

j_lex wrote:
Hi Dave,
I have a few questions on the following baptisms.

Przybranowo 1798_sadowkich_zofia
The first half seems fairly straight forward; Baptism in Przybranowo on 22 April 1798 of legitimate infant Zofia born 18 Apr to Jan and Magdalena Sadwskich. The second half, starting with --Patrim, I am uncertain but may be listing godparents.

Kawęczyn 1801_Laks_Boguslaw
Similar situation to the first baptism. Is it safe to assume that this Kawęczyn is roughly 20km east of Torun? Baptism in Kawęczyn on 25 May 1801 of infant named Boguslaw, son of Boguslaw Jan and Dorota Lax. Family may include Joachimus Biatkowski of Kawęczyn and Marianna Kaminishka of Grabe and Joanna Biatkowska of Kawęczyn.
Is there significance to the HH before Boguslaw Jan (more distinct in the second version)?
And is there relevance to the faint portion at the bottom, which may be in Polish. I can ask on the page is that is better.

Thanks again!
-J


Hi J,

I’ll check out your records tomorrow. BTW the first record is an image of the parish register. The next two are certificates issued in 1822, the year the individuals married.

Dave
View user's profile
Send private message
j_lex



Joined: 06 Feb 2021
Replies: 35
Location: Buffalo, NY

Back to top
Post Posted: Sun Dec 05, 2021 6:33 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

dnowicki wrote:


Hi J,

I’ll check out your records tomorrow. BTW the first record is an image of the parish register. The next two are certificates issued in 1822, the year the individuals married.

Dave


Thanks Dave, no rush on the translation.
Just came across a Kawęczyn just a few kilometers west of Sluzewo, so I'll go with that one.

My understanding is that the 1822 marriage book and records was lost, the attached records are 'allegata' or other records gathered for the now lost marriage record. There was an additional record, but it is in fully in Polish so I did not include originally. I have included it now, hopefully for clarity.



boguslaw lax.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  363.08 KB
 Viewed:  0 Time(s)

boguslaw lax.jpg


View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 1:51 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

j_lex wrote:
Hi Dave,
I have a few questions on the following baptisms.

Przybranowo 1798_sadowkich_zofia
The first half seems fairly straight forward; Baptism in Przybranowo on 22 April 1798 of legitimate infant Zofia born 18 Apr to Jan and Magdalena Sadwskich. The second half, starting with --Patrim, I am uncertain but may be listing godparents.

Kawęczyn 1801_Laks_Boguslaw
Similar situation to the first baptism. Is it safe to assume that this Kawęczyn is roughly 20km east of Torun? Baptism in Kawęczyn on 25 May 1801 of infant named Boguslaw, son of Boguslaw Jan and Dorota Lax. Family may include Joachimus Biatkowski of Kawęczyn and Marianna Kaminishka of Grabe and Joanna Biatkowska of Kawęczyn.
Is there significance to the HH before Boguslaw Jan (more distinct in the second version)?
And is there relevance to the faint portion at the bottom, which may be in Polish. I can ask on the page is that is better.

Thanks again!
-J


Hi J,

The village of Kawęczyn which you suggest is the correct place. A handy way to verify the geography is to use https://mapa.szukacz.pl/mapnik.html and to check the nearby villages with the villages found on the page of the parish register. All the villages found on the page are near Kawęczyn and thus you can be certain you’ve found the correct place.

The marriages for Służewo for 1822 may still exist but just not in the Polish National Archives. One of Geneteka’s pages https://parafie.genealodzy.pl/index.php?op=pr&pid=7805 shows that copies of records for the parish are held in the archive of the Diocese of Włocławek. Those records are not available online by it may be worthwhile to contact the archive directly.

The sections in Polish attached to the Latin baptismal certificates (including your final post yesterday) deal with the civil purpose of the certificates and add no genealogical information.

The questions regarding the abbreviation and the patrini (sponsors aka godparents) are answered in the notes following the translations. Those assisting, Jan Kaminski & Joanna Bialkowska assuredly are the spouses of Joachim and Maryanna. It is interesting to note that Zofia paid 2 groszy more for her certificate than Bogusław did for his...sounds like a case of gender inequality.

The translations follow. I hope you find them helpful.

Dave


Entry in parish baptismal register
Kawęczyn. In the year 1801 on the 25th day of May I, the same as above, baptized an infant by the name of Bogusław born on the 18th day of the same (month& year), the son of the upright* Bogusław Jan and Dorota Lax**. The sposnors*** were the renowned**** Joachim Białkowski from Kawęczyn and Maryanna Kaminska from Grabie; those assisting***** were Jan Kaminski from Grabie and Joanna Białkowska from Kawęczyn.

Notes: *HH: abbreviation for honestus/upright. The adjective was used for a \farmer from a small town. The Polish is uczciwy.
**Laxów: The Polish plural form is used to indicate that the surname is the married name of both spouses.
***patrini/sponsors: The official term for those who are commonly called godparents. Catholic Church law required one sponsor for baptism but in common practice there were usually two, a male and a female.
****famatus/renowned: adjective used to describe a middle class craftsman
*****adstantes/those assisting/those also present: Since no more than 2 sponsors were allowed others who were there but had no official role in the baptismal ceremony were listed as “those assisting”.



Certificate issued in 1821:
Top: Revenue stamp for 8 groszy; Number 16
Extract from the Baptismal Register of the Parish Church of Grabie of the following tenor.
Kawęczyn
In the year 1801 on the 25th day of May I, the same as above, baptized an infant by the name of Bogusław born on the 18th day of the same (month& year), the son of the upright* Bogusław Jan and Dorota Lax**. The sposnors*** were the renowned**** Joachim Białkowski from Kawęczyn and Maryanna Kaminska from Grabie; those assisting***** were Jan Kaminski from Grabie and Joanna Białkowska from Kawęczyn.
In testimony of which I sign with my own hand and confirm by affixing the seal of the Church of Grabie. Given in Grabie on the 18th day of October in the year 1821.
Signature of parish priest and the parish seal.
Note in Polish to the left of the seal notes the civil use for which the certificate had been presented.

Notes: *HH: abbreviation for honestus/upright. The adjective was used for a \farmer from a small town. The Polish is uczciwy.
**Laxów: The Polish plural form is used to indicate that the surname is the married name of both spouses.
***patrini/sponsors: The official term for those who are commonly called godparents. Catholic Church law required one sponsor for baptism but in common practice there were usually two, a male and a female.
****famatus/renowned: adjective used to describe a middle class craftsman
*****adstantes/those assisting/those also present: Since no more than 2 sponsors were allowed others who were there but had no official role in the baptismal ceremony were listed as “those assisting”.


Certificate presented by Zofia Sadowska

Top: (In Polish): For the Akt of Bogusław Lax with Zofia Sado(w)ska
Revenue stamp for 10 groszy
Number 16

Extract from the baptismal register of the church of Służewo as follows:

Przybranowo
In the year 1798 on the 22nd day of April Józef Sanczynski, pastor of the Church of Służewo, baptized an infant by the name of Zofia, born on the 18th day of April, the daughter of the legitimate marital union of Jan and Magdalena Sadowski*. The sponsors** were Marcin Przybysz with Katarzyna Pachowska.
In testimony of which I sign with my own hand anjd affix the seal of theb Church of Służewo on the 25th day of October in the year 1822. Signature of the pastor of Służewo followed by the parish seal.

Notes: *Polish Genitive plural ending—ich—signifies that this is the married surname of both spouses.
**patrini/sponsors: The official term for those who are commonly called godparents. Catholic Church law required one sponsor for baptism but in common practice there were usually two, a male and a female.
View user's profile
Send private message
j_lex



Joined: 06 Feb 2021
Replies: 35
Location: Buffalo, NY

Back to top
Post Posted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 8:51 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Thank you Dave for the translations and additional insight!
View user's profile
Send private message
starshadow
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 09 May 2013
Replies: 287

Back to top
Post Posted: Tue Dec 07, 2021 8:47 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

What does it mean when someone is listed as "kolonista"? Is that considered an actual occupation? Or a social status?
View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Wed Dec 08, 2021 9:40 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

starshadow wrote:
What does it mean when someone is listed as "kolonista"? Is that considered an actual occupation? Or a social status?


Starshadow,

There is no simple, one size-fits-all answer to your question. It depends on the time and the place. Originally a colonus(Latin)/kolonista(Polish) was a settler or colonizer or a colonist, if you will, when a new settlement/village was being established. Later the term came to be used with different meanings at various times and in various places. It could mean a poor peasant, a land tenant, a farmer, etc. depending on the time and the place. In short, the term can involve elements of status/condition as well as elements of an occupation. In many words the distinction between occupation and status is not at all clear, e.g. is uxor (wife) describing status or occupation? I suppose that the most accurate answer is: “Some of each”. Perhaps you’ll find the next post (a list of over 825 Latin occupational words which most people never knew existed nor cared about and really never expect to encounter) of some interest.

I hope that this explanation helps to answer your question to some degree.

Dave
View user's profile
Send private message
dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 2363
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

Back to top
Post Posted: Wed Dec 08, 2021 9:52 am      Post subject: Latin Occupations, Status Vocabulary & Given Names
Reply with quote

dnowicki wrote:


Perhaps you’ll find the next post (a list of over 825 Latin occupational words which most people never knew existed nor cared about and really never expect to encounter) of some interest.

Dave


Salvete Omnes (Hi All),

Earlier this year a member of the PO Forum suggested that it would be helpful were I to compile a list of Latin occupations similar to what I had done with Latin given names. At the time I had not the time nor the desire to undertake the project. However, during the past several months I did compile a list of over 825 Latin occupational words. I thought that it would be useful to produce a list of Latin words with their English and Polish equivalents. I began with the list composed by Rafał T. Prinke in his Poradnik genealoga-amatora (1992) and modified that list and added vocabulary I’ve seen over many years as a student, teacher, and retiree. I composed the list of occupations as a spreadsheet with the Latin, the Polish, and the English forms of the vocabulary. However, in order to make the list easy to download I converted it into two PDF documents, one as a Latin and English list and another as a Latin and Polish list. Here is attached the Latin-English version. I would be happy to share the Latin-Polish version with anyone interested in that version.

A few of the words in the list are words which we would not necessarily consider occupations (like wife or mother) but they do fit into the occupational/condition of life views of the 17th, 18th, 19th and early 20th Centuries for genealogical purposes. Latin, just as other languages, employed synonyms for many words. Some of these synonyms involve minor changes in spelling of changes which make a given synonym change from one of Latin’s Five Declensions to another Declension. The vocabulary is listed in the way it would be found in a Latin dictionary: the first form is the Nominative; the second is the Genitive, which is followed by the Gender. The Genitive ending indicates the Declension to which the noun belongs and also is the form from which the stem of the noun is derived. The Genitive Singular endings of the five Declensions are: 1st ae; 2nd i; 3rd is; 4th us; and the 5th ei. The majority of Latin nouns belong to the first three declensions. Words which are synonyms because of spelling variations are listed separately in an attempt to provide as much information as possible to those who are not familiar with the Latin language.

Many of the occupations are found among individuals who lived in cities and towns and do not appear among those who lived in rural villages and were involved in farming. For records from the early 19th Century and earlier it is important to use this list in tandem with the Social/economic status vocabulary list which is also attached to this post. To complete the trio the latest version of given names is also attached.

Those who find the list helpful may consider it an early Xmas gift.

Omnibus (To everyone): Felicia Christi Natalitia et Annum Faustum! (Merry Christmas & Happy New Year)

Valete (Farewell/Be well)

Dave



2021 December 3 Latin-English Occupations.pdf
 Description:

Download
 Filename:  2021 December 3 Latin-English Occupations.pdf
 Filesize:  59.85 KB
 Downloaded:  48 Time(s)


Vocabulary Distinguishing Classes of Peasants, Nobles & Clergy 2021 Dec. 1.pdf
 Description:

Download
 Filename:  Vocabulary Distinguishing Classes of Peasants, Nobles & Clergy 2021 Dec. 1.pdf
 Filesize:  94.15 KB
 Downloaded:  42 Time(s)


GIVEN NAMES-LATIN, ENGLISH, POLISH 2021 December 1.pdf
 Description:

Download
 Filename:  GIVEN NAMES-LATIN, ENGLISH, POLISH 2021 December 1.pdf
 Filesize:  74.52 KB
 Downloaded:  39 Time(s)

View user's profile
Send private message
starshadow
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 09 May 2013
Replies: 287

Back to top
Post Posted: Thu Dec 09, 2021 7:15 pm      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Thanks Dave. These are immensely helpful. Wesołych Świąt!

I was also reading one of your previous compilations, "Saint Days Observed in Poland". Do you have these two: Julianna de Falcon (born July 19th?), and Marianna de Ornat?
View user's profile
Send private message
j_lex



Joined: 06 Feb 2021
Replies: 35
Location: Buffalo, NY

Back to top
Post Posted: Fri Dec 10, 2021 8:24 am      Post subject:
Reply with quote

Dave, thank you for taking the time to put these lists together! Wishing you the best.
View user's profile
Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PolishOrigins Forum Index -> Research in Poland All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222  Next Page 218 of 222

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB ©

© 2022 COPYRIGHTS BY THE OWNER OF POLISHORIGINS.COM