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KKempa



Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Replies: 43
Location: Ontario, Canada

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Post Posted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 4:55 pm      Post subject: Dolar and Nanikowski?
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I'm curious about the surname Dolar. I've been trying to find family information for a few years now and my online research leads me to believe that this name is of Celtic origin. Most of the information I found is Scottish family trees.

I read some history of Galicia/Poland/Ukraine and saw mention of an old trade route, that some of the traders using the route married local women, settled in Ukraine/Poland, and maybe that's how the surname Dolar ended up in Poland and Ukraine. I'm just guessing though.

My grandfather Dolar lived in what is now part of Ukraine but was classified as "Polish". His wife (maiden name Kohut) was Ukrainian. On the other side of my family (paternal) are Kempa and Wolak from Rozdziele (Bochnia County; there are two Rozdziele; Poland). My maiden name was Kempa. I am concentrating on the maternal side (Dolar / Kohut) because my mother is still alive (85 years old) and wants family information. She knows so little of her family.
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Zenon
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Joined: 28 Apr 2007
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Post Posted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:29 pm      Post subject:
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Well... Dolar is just English dollar.. What may be interesting for you there are only 11 Dolars in the whole Poland, click here for map: https://nazwiska-polskie.pl/Dolar . Ten of them live in Lublin and one in Puławy.
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KKempa



Joined: 05 Apr 2009
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:31 am      Post subject:
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Thank you for that, Zenon. No, there are not many with that name. That it means "dollar" is more puzzling. What are all those Scottish people doing with a Polish name then, haha! Makes me wonder when dollars $ started being called dollars. Most of my family changed it to the Dollar spelling when they moved to Canada.
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:34 am      Post subject:
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Zenon, that little boy looks like he's sleeping on your shoulders Laughing [/img]
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Zenon
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:54 am      Post subject:
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Quote:
Zenon, that little boy looks like he's sleeping on your shoulders Laughing


This is our daughter Amelia when she was about 1.5, and yes she fell asleep on my shoulders then Wink.
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Henryk
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Joined: 05 Dec 2008
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Post Posted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:35 pm      Post subject: Re: Scots in Poland
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Many Scots lived in Poland, 33,000 by 1600s. One of the origins of the surname Szot is a corruption of Szkot: Polish for Scot.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_people#Poland
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From as far back as the mid 15th century there were Scots trading and settling in Poland. A Scot's Pedlar Pack in Poland, which became a proverbial expression, usually consisted of cloths, woollen goods and linen handkerchiefs. Itinerants also sold tin and ironware such as scissors and knives. Along with the protection offered by King Stephen in the Royal Grant of 1576 a district in Krakow was assigned to Scots immigrants.

Records from 1592 reveal Scots settlers being granted citizenship of Krakow giving their employment as trader or merchant. Payment for being granted citizenship ranged from 12 Polish florins to a musket and gunpowder or an undertaking to marry within a year and a day of acquiring a holding.

By the 1600s there were an estimated 30,000 Scots living in Poland. Many came from Dundee and Aberdeen and could be found in Polish towns from Krakow to Lublin. Settlers from Aberdeenshire were mainly Episcopalians or Catholics, but there were also large numbers of Calvinists. As well as Scottish traders, there were also many Scottish soldiers in Poland. In 1656 a number of Scottish Highlanders who were disenchanted with Oliver Cromwell's rule went to Poland in the service of the King of Sweden.

The Scots integrated well and many acquired great wealth. They contributed to many charitable institutions in the host country, but did not forget their homeland; for example, in 1701 when collections were made for the restoration fund of the Marischal College, Aberdeen, the Scottish settlers in Poland gave generously.

Many Royal Grants and privileges were granted to Scottish merchants until the 1700s at which time the settlers began to merge more and more into the native population. Bonnie Prince Charlie was half Polish, being the son of James Edward Stewart and Clementina Sobieska, granddaughter of Jan Sobieski, King of Poland.[32][33][34] The City of Warsaw elected a Scottish immigrant Aleksander Czamer (Alexander Chalmers) as the mayor.[35]
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:51 pm      Post subject:
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Very interesting, Henryk. Thank you!
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 1:53 pm      Post subject:
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I just read elsewhere (says taken from the Dictionary of American Family Names) that the name Dolar is Thaler in German. Origin from old Germanic word "dol" meaning valley. A Dolar or Doler would be a resident of a valley.
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 2:56 pm      Post subject:
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Just now, I finally found my grandmother's marriage record online -- her 2nd marriage, to my step-grandfather, Anthony Slugocki. His mother's surname is listed as "Nanikoski". There are many spelling errors on this record and I've never heard of a name even similar to this. The first letter, the "N", may be something else -- very hard to decipher, could be a "V". Can anyone here think of a similar surname they know of?
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 6:05 pm      Post subject:
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KKempa wrote:
...His mother's surname is listed as "Nanikoski". There are many spelling errors on this record and I've never heard of a name even similar to this. The first letter, the "N", may be something else -- very hard to decipher, could be a "V". Can anyone here think of a similar surname they know of?


You might try Janikoski -Jankowski (feminine: Jankowska, plural: Jankowscy) is the 13th most common surname in Poland! Go search that name on wiki for more.

Bill
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Shellie
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Post Posted: Wed Dec 28, 2011 7:10 pm      Post subject:
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KKempa wrote:
Just now, I finally found my grandmother's marriage record online -- her 2nd marriage, to my step-grandfather, Anthony Slugocki. His mother's surname is listed as "Nanikoski". There are many spelling errors on this record and I've never heard of a name even similar to this. The first letter, the "N", may be something else -- very hard to decipher, could be a "V". Can anyone here think of a similar surname they know of?


Can you post the link to your grandmother's marriage record, or attach the image? Perhaps having other eyes examining the name might help lead you to an answer. Wink
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 3:54 pm      Post subject:
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I hope this works as I was signed in at Ancestry.ca to grab it. I was searching for Maria Kogut/Kohut/Dolar and Anthony Slugocki with no luck. The last time I just entered "Dollar" and there it was. Mary Dollar, his name misspelled.

http://search.ancestry.ca/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=ontariomarr1858-1899_ga&h=8093444&ti=5543&indiv=try&gss=pt

Thank you for your help.
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 4:11 pm      Post subject:
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Well, that doesn't work! I printed and scanned but it printed very grey.[/img]


scan0001.jpg
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KKempa



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Post Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 4:18 pm      Post subject:
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This also goes to show how unreliable info from family can be. Mom told me that Anthony had a brother in Kitchener and I found his marriage certificate also. The two show different parents. That "brother" is more probably a cousin.
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Cheri Vanden Berg
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Post Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 7:44 pm      Post subject: Nowikoski??
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I think it's a good scan. Without looking back at what you thought the name was, I thought it said Nowikoski. I did wonder about the 3rd letter, but I do think it could possibly be a w, so I did see that Nowikoski is a viable surname, as is Nowikowski, and Nowakowski, and perhaps other spellings of this surname. I am rather new to Polish genealogy, but I know in my other family lines there wasn't necessarily a set spelling until there had to be once Social Security began - all that seemed to matter was the sound of the name. Maybe someone else will see something else, but I do think the name starts with an N.
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