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Bill Rushin
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

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Post Posted: Fri May 04, 2012 3:59 pm      Post subject:
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jbudz922 wrote:
Bill

Let me add my grandparents Frank (Franciszek) Budz and Louise (Ludwica) Ogarek. They were married in SS Cyril & Methodist Church in 1907 and lived at various addresses on Justine and Laflin between 49th and 50th st. as the family grew. Namely: 1910 - 4509 Justine, 1917 - 4721 Laflin, 1921 - 4946 Justine. They then moved prior to 1930 to Whipple.Jack ps. We found my Grandfather was from Biakla not Murzasichle.


Thanks Jack, I'll add them to the next map I post. BTW, I did a quick check on my Bialka marriage records but no Ogarek's were listed. Bill

(ps. my Jan Budz was from Groń just one ridgetop away)


Last edited by Bill Rushin on Sun May 06, 2012 6:57 pm; edited 1 time in total
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jbudz922



Joined: 14 Aug 2010
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Post Posted: Sat May 05, 2012 9:53 pm      Post subject:
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Bill

Thanks for looking. My grandparents were married in the "Back of the Yards" at Sts Cyril & Methodius in 1907. The Ogarek's came from Bienkowka 40 miles NNE of Bialka.

We are trying to identify a Jan Budz who lived in Carbondale , PA. My grandfather's brother list him as the individual he was going to see on the ship manifest in1909.
There was also an Antonina Budz from Bukowina going to a Jan Budz in Port Griffin,Pa.

Jack
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justvicki



Joined: 22 Apr 2012
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Post Posted: Sat May 05, 2012 11:11 pm      Post subject:
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Although my grandparents who immigrated from Ludzmierz in Nowy Targ did not moved to Chicago, their children did and lived in the Back of the Yards neighborhoods. Jack and Nellie (Sayko) Rokosik - 4809 S. Loomis; Mike and Anna (Kadas) Sayko - 5431 S. Marshfield, Joe and Caroline (Sayko) Yanko; Matthew Sayko. and Mary Sayko (worked at Swift & Co. for 35 years) - 1611 W. Garfield and John and Ann (Hopkins) Sayko - 56th and S. Loomis.
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Ute
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Joined: 13 Dec 2009
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Location: Germany

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Post Posted: Sun May 06, 2012 1:21 am      Post subject:
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In an article on Polish Chicago the link to which Vicki posted in the forum section "Where did our Polish ancestors live ...?" I found a picture of the Walter and Mary Zielinski Tavern in the Back of the Yards in the late 1920s or early 1930s. The picture says "Walter's Tavern", 1147, W 47th St." I looks like they were having fun.

http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/11633.html


Last edited by Ute on Mon May 07, 2012 1:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Bill Rushin
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

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Post Posted: Sun May 06, 2012 6:56 pm      Post subject:
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jbudz922 wrote:
We are trying to identify a Jan Budz who lived in Carbondale , PA. My grandfather's brother list him as the individual he was going to see on the ship manifest in1909.
There was also an Antonina Budz from Bukowina going to a Jan Budz in Port Griffin,Pa. Jack


Jack, I'm very familiar with this area. 30+ yrs ago my old uncle Daniel told me a Rusin boy stopped by our farm in SE Ohio (1920-30 era) and stated he was our cousin. Said he was from Carbondale and also a coal miner. So I have been looking for records in this area for a long time. I recently contacted Father Joseph Rusin (from Gron) was a priest there for many years. He's 85 yrs young but doesn't remember anything about living Poland. (He changed his name to Rusean so there was no "sin" in his name!) I may still have some immigration and census records from this area-some on my other old HD. If you have run across John Rusin in this area I think he is my relative. Please keep in touch. Bill


Last edited by Bill Rushin on Mon May 07, 2012 7:23 am; edited 1 time in total
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Bill Rushin
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
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Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

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Post Posted: Mon May 07, 2012 7:16 am      Post subject:
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BOY map update.


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Ute
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Joined: 13 Dec 2009
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Post Posted: Fri May 11, 2012 11:13 pm      Post subject: Back-of-the-Yards at ebay
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I just saw this on ebay and thought I share it with you:
http://www.ebay.de/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l2736&_nkw=Back+of+the+Yards+Chicago.
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 1:14 am      Post subject:
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Thanks, I took Ed Kozak's advice and bought "Images of America, Back of the Yards" by Jeanette Swist. Hundreds of pictures and my BOY map is on the 2nd page!

I caught a clip of "Who do you think you are" tonight. Jason Sudeikis family lived/worked in the BOY! I made a map of what was mentioned in the clip.



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Ute
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 3:59 am      Post subject:
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Bill Rushin wrote:
Thanks, I took Ed Kozak's advice and bought "Images of America, Back of the Yards" by Jeanette Swist. Hundreds of pictures and my BOY map is on the 2nd page!

I caught a clip of "Who do you think you are" tonight. Jason Sudeikis family lived/worked in the BOY! I made a map of what was mentioned in the clip.

Bill,
Thanks for the map. Do you know what kind of company Swift & Co. in the Back of the Yards was?
justvicki wrote on 22 Apr 2912: 10 of my mothers 14 brothers and sisters (Sayko, Sojka, Szojka) settled on Chicago's southside and lived on South Marshfield. My Aunt Mary took the Ashland Avenue bus five days a week for 35 years to the Back of the Yards to work at Swift & Company.
Must have been a major employer for the area.
Ute
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justvicki



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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 8:53 am      Post subject:
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Ute:

Here's a link on Swift & Co.
http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/2869.html

My aunt worked in the section where salami and pepperoni were produced. In addition to meatpacking, Swift sold various dairy and grocery items, including Lazy Maple bacon, Brown 'N Serve breakfast sausage, Swiftning shortening, Allsweet margarine, Brookfield butter, cheese under the Brookfield, Pauly and Treasure Cave brands, and Peter Pan peanut butter. Swift also sold frozen turkeys under the Butterball brand. Swift & Co. left the Back of the Yards in the 1980's but, it is still the world's largest processor of fresh beef and pork, with more than US$30 billion in annual sales as of 2010.
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 9:08 am      Post subject:
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Bill, Do you know what kind of company Swift & Co. in the Back of the Yards was? Must have been a major employer for the area. Ute


You made me smile with that question, since you live in Germany maybe these names are unfamiliar to you. Armour, Swift, Libby, Nelson-Morris and Continental were all meat packing companies. They employed over 40,000 people at one time. The Union Stock Yards was the largest slaughter house in the world! This is how the BOY got it's name, the community was located on the "backside" (across the street) of these stockyards.

"The Union Stock Yard & Transit Co., or "The Yards", was the meatpacking district in Chicago for over a century starting in 1865. The district was operated by a group of railroad companies that acquired swampland and turned it to a centralized processing area. It operated in the "New City" community area of Chicago, Illinois for 106 years, helping the city become known as "hog butcher for the world" and the center of the American meatpacking industry for decades". (Between 1865 and 1900, approximately 400 million livestock were butchered within the confines of the Yards)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Stock_Yards

I remember a lot of our canned meat was from these companies in the 60's especially from Armour and Swift. (corned beef and vienna sausages was a favorite).



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Ute
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 9:31 am      Post subject:
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[quote="Bill Rushin"]
Quote:
Bill, Do you know what kind of company Swift & Co. in the Back of the Yards was? Must have been a major employer for the area. Ute


You made me smile with that question, since you live in Germany maybe these names are unfamiliar to you. Armour, Swift, Libby, Nelson-Morris and Continental were all meat packing companies. They employed over 40,000 people at one time. The Union Stock Yards was the largest slaughter house in the world! This is how the BOY got it's name, the community was located on the "backside" (across the street) of these stockyards.

Thank you, Vicki and Bill! You're right, Bill, these names -- except for Libby's -- are really unfamiliar to me. Your picture shows all these pigs, sheep, and cattle in pens, does that mean they were all waiting to be slaughtered that very day? Or did they keep them there for longer? As an animal lover, I don't think I would have liked to live there right next to the slaughter houses. Shocked Would rather have worked as a roofer. Laughing


Last edited by Ute on Sat May 12, 2012 11:13 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 10:20 am      Post subject:
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You're right, Bill, these names -- except for Libby's -- are really unfamiliar to me. Your picture shows all these pigs, sheep, and cattle in pens, does that mean they were all waiting to be slaughtered that very day? Or did they keep them there for longer? As an animal lover, I don't think I would have liked to live there right next to the slaughter houses. Shocked Would rather have worked as a roofer Laughing


The contents of these pens changed constantly. I don't know about the cattle volume but I read that they processed 10,000 hogs a day later in the 1940's. I would guess 3 days turnover for all. Trains were bringing in cows, pigs and sheep daily. And the new refrigerated train cars were going out to cities all over the united states to meat distributors. (these refrigerated train cars changed the way meat was processed-it use to be done locally in each city, now centralized in Chicago by the railroad men which made them millionaires). Do a search on the homes of Swift, Amour and others. Mega-buck homes!

People should realize that butchering was very common back then and a family event at times. It depended on what animal and how many were needed at the time. People did not have freezers so they had to kill weekly to feed the family. Cats and dogs were pets, everything else was going in the pot sooner or later. I must admit I butchered my first pig at 13! Don't hate me Ute, Very Happy
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Ute
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 10:49 am      Post subject:
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Bill Rushin wrote:
People should realize that butchering was very common back then and a family event at times. It depended on what animal and how many were needed at the time. People did not have freezers so they had to kill weekly to feed the family. Cats and dogs were pets, everything else was going in the pot sooner or later. I must admit I butchered my first pig at 13! Don't hate me Ute, Very Happy

I'll never hate you, Bill ... When we were kids near where I grew up was a small slaughterhouse where the local butcher slaughtered pigs and calves. Sometimes they left the doors open and we kids would go there and watch it with big eyes, just out of curiosity. Today I couldn't do that any more. I also wouldn't have been a good farmer's wife, my pigs, cows, and sheep would all have died of old age ... Laughing
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Bill Rushin
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Post Posted: Sat May 12, 2012 1:57 pm      Post subject:
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I also wouldn't have been a good farmer's wife, my pigs, cows, and sheep would all have died of old age ... Laughing


As you started to starve your farmer would have traded you in for another, Laughing

I actually started to hate them after the cute pet thing wore off. Our water supply was 102 steps, downhill to the well. (our cousins farm was on a steep hillside -because love of the Tatra's) Carrying 2 buckets of water and making 6-8 trips to the house and animal pens was not fun each morning. (rain water barrel was used for other things and fire protection only). 4 piglets purchased in the spring needed to be feed twice a day to get fattened up to be butchered around Thanksgiving. We hauled apples in buckets, gave them loaves of days old bread mixed with several 1 gallon cans of Army surplus dried egg yolks (what is this used for, baking very large cakes?) and a little field corn. And water. They also had family food scraps added in, the dreaded slop bucket with potato peels and who knows what in it. Then once a week we had to shovel you know what and put down a bale of clean straw. Pigs looked happy as hell but my 12 yr old cousin John Matusek and I did not share in their happiness. After several weeks of this we couldn't wait to see them die. We started talking about smoked pork chops more often. We rode them one day in celebration of their fatness or dumbness as dad called it. We didn't know they can eat you! We were in a small pen with 4 pissed off pigs who knew they didn't look like horses at all. We nicknamed them "bacon buddies".

Young Billy goat got a bucket of some kind of pellet food and more water, move his chain stake every now and then to mow different areas. He loved to knock you down at any time too. He ate a beer can more than once, a lump of coal and other things until dad caught us and put a stop to that nonsense. Chickens and ducks got feed and more damn water. Chickens were sacrificed weekly for the pot, Yay! unless you had the unfortunate job to pluck them. Did I mention more water for the hot tubs of this dreaded liquid to dip them in. Very smelly chore. Beef was butchered in the winter when it was cold, split in two with a hack saw and hatchet and hung in barn to age a while. We had a smokehouse too, lots of small cuts hung in there. Love this smell and seeing my bacon buddies hanging there!

Our fathers and older brothers were working in the coal mines while this was all going on to pay the other bills. Now I knew why farmers had a lot of children, there was a lot of work to be done each day no matter what to keep the damned animals fed and watered to feed all of us. Pets and critters are two different animals. I loved my dogs, critters I envision steaks, pork chops and drumsticks. <grin>. I am really glad I experienced this now, but it wasn't much fun when your doing it, except for riding the bacon boys!
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