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Zbyhu



Joined: 11 Dec 2019
Replies: 2
Location: Rybnik, Poland

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Post Posted: Wed Dec 11, 2019 6:01 am      Post subject: Maryanski Family from Bayonne
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Hello,

I am searching for contact and information about Maryanski Family members from Bayonne, New Jersey.
I would like to contact with them to try to understand history of my family in Poland.
My research has been going on for over 10 years now and I have already quite a lot of informations.

The person which interests me the most is Franciszek / Frank Maryanski, born in 1862 in Poland. He married Ewa / Eva Duszynska in Poland in 1886 and then emigrated with her in 1888 to United States on ship Rhaetia.
They had at least 3 sons - Jan / John (born in Poland in 1887), Józef / Joseph born in 1888 in Yonkers and Michał / Michael born in 1891.
At this point in time something must have happened to Frank's wife Eva, because in 1896 he married my grandmother Petronela back in Poland.

If my research is correct first son Jan / John Maryanski married Stefania Fordonski at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Bayonne on 23 May 1911. He had 5 children and died in 1918.
Franciszek / Frank Maryanski died on 19.07.1921 in Bayonne hospital - according to newspapper Bayonne Times, so he came back once again from Poland to USA. He is burried in Holy Name Catholic Cementery in New Jersey along with son Jan / John. I have photo of the grave (Maryanski and Fordonki family).

I would like to try to get some documents:
- death act of Frank Maryanski from 1921,
- deatch act of John Maryanski from 1918,
- marriage act of John Maryanski with Stefania from 1911,
- anything about Eva Maryanska (born Duszynska) - divorce or death act (around 1891-1896).

I am living in Poland so access to the archives and databases is difficult for me.

Please, help Smile.

Regards from Poland,
Zbigniew Maryanski
(zbyhu)
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mcdonald0517
PolishOrigins Patron


Joined: 27 May 2012
Replies: 604

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Post Posted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 10:59 pm      Post subject:
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Hello Zbyhu,

I did some research looking for the records you requested.

Unfortunately, Bayonne, New Jersey does not have these records digitized in online databases.

You have to make a request by mail for the records from the New Jersey department of health. Here is a link showing what is required

https://www.state.nj.us/health/vital/order-vital/genealogical-records/

On the other hand, I did find a 1903 passenger list for Frank, his bride, and all 3 sons leaving Poland and returning back to Bayonne NJ. It is attached. What is interesting is that the name of his wife on the list is Maria - not Petronella.

I will see if I can find information on the Catholic diocese. Maybe you can contact them to search for burial and marriage records.

Finally, are you in contact with any of the descendants of Frank Maryanski in Bayonne? I saw a couple of family trees in Ancestry.com that have the Maryanski family. Let me know if you want me to send them a message on your behalf to see if they would like to be in contact with you. Then you can share information.

All the best,
Cynthia



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1903 passenger list
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dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 1946
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

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Post Posted: Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:12 am      Post subject: Re: Maryanski Family from Bayonne
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Zbyhu wrote:
Hello,

I am searching for contact and information about Maryanski Family members from Bayonne, New Jersey.
I would like to contact with them to try to understand history of my family in Poland.
My research has been going on for over 10 years now and I have already quite a lot of informations.

The person which interests me the most is Franciszek / Frank Maryanski, born in 1862 in Poland. He married Ewa / Eva Duszynska in Poland in 1886 and then emigrated with her in 1888 to United States on ship Rhaetia.
They had at least 3 sons - Jan / John (born in Poland in 1887), Józef / Joseph born in 1888 in Yonkers and Michał / Michael born in 1891.
At this point in time something must have happened to Frank's wife Eva, because in 1896 he married my grandmother Petronela back in Poland.

If my research is correct first son Jan / John Maryanski married Stefania Fordonski at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Bayonne on 23 May 1911. He had 5 children and died in 1918.
Franciszek / Frank Maryanski died on 19.07.1921 in Bayonne hospital - according to newspapper Bayonne Times, so he came back once again from Poland to USA. He is burried in Holy Name Catholic Cementery in New Jersey along with son Jan / John. I have photo of the grave (Maryanski and Fordonki family).

I would like to try to get some documents:
- death act of Frank Maryanski from 1921,
- deatch act of John Maryanski from 1918,
- marriage act of John Maryanski with Stefania from 1911,
- anything about Eva Maryanska (born Duszynska) - divorce or death act (around 1891-1896).

I am living in Poland so access to the archives and databases is difficult for me.

Please, help Smile.

Regards from Poland,
Zbigniew Maryanski
(zbyhu)


Hi Zbigniew & Cynthia,

The Polish parish in Bayonne was Our Lady of Mt. Carmel (founded 1898). It merged with two other parishes and is now the parish of St. John Paul II. Here is a link to the parish information: http://www.johnpaul2parish.com/
Family Search has films for baptisms and marriages for Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. Unfortunately, they are able to be viewed only at a Family History Center or an accredited public library. Here is a link to the Family Search records: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/295831?availability=Family%20History%20Library
It would seem to me that the easiest way to request death and burial records from the church would be write or email the parish directly. Marriage & baptism records could be obtained from the parish or from Family Search. Given the names of the parish priests and their religious order it would seem that contact could be made either in English or in Polish. Parish records for Ewa would be a bit more difficult to find. The Polish parish was founded in 1898 and the question is what parish/parishes did Poles attend prior to that time? It was common practice for Poles to attend an English speaking parish (or an ethnic parish such as German, Italian, etc. until they were able to organize their own ethnic parish). Perhaps the priests at St. John Paul II parish could help with that information.

For what it is worth, according to Wacław Kruszka’s Historya Polska w Ameryce, the parish was founded in 1894 rather than in 1898. Part of the difficulty in determining relevant facts is that those years were about the same time when Hodur broke with the Roman Catholic Church and founded the Polish National Catholic Church. (There also is a Polish National Catholic parish in Bayonne.) Kruszka’s work is available online from the Harvard University Library at this link: https://digitalcollections.library.harvard.edu/catalog/990056612550203941 The parish in Bayonne is found in Tom 13 Rozdzial VI pages 75 & 76 (sequence 2326 & 2327).

I hope this information is helpful to your research.

Pozdrawiam z Indiany,

Dawid
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Zbyhu



Joined: 11 Dec 2019
Replies: 2
Location: Rybnik, Poland

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Post Posted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 2:27 am      Post subject:
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Hello,

mcdonald0517 wrote:
Hello Zbyhu,

I did some research looking for the records you requested.

Unfortunately, Bayonne, New Jersey does not have these records digitized in online databases.

You have to make a request by mail for the records from the New Jersey department of health. Here is a link showing what is required

https://www.state.nj.us/health/vital/order-vital/genealogical-records/

On the other hand, I did find a 1903 passenger list for Frank, his bride, and all 3 sons leaving Poland and returning back to Bayonne NJ. It is attached. What is interesting is that the name of his wife on the list is Maria - not Petronella.

I will see if I can find information on the Catholic diocese. Maybe you can contact them to search for burial and marriage records.

Finally, are you in contact with any of the descendants of Frank Maryanski in Bayonne? I saw a couple of family trees in Ancestry.com that have the Maryanski family. Let me know if you want me to send them a message on your behalf to see if they would like to be in contact with you. Then you can share information.

All the best,
Cynthia


Thank You Cynthia for Your answer and help.
I didn't wanted to go into details with my first message. In fact I have already found earlier that ship passenger list from 1903. I belive that Frank Maryanski did multiple trips to the United States. First time in 1888 with wife Eva and son John. Second time probably in 1896 on ship Aachen. On that passenger list it seems that Frank is traveling alone to US and the date is just 5 months after he married my grandmother Petronela. On that ship list there is information, that Frank is already a citizen of US, so I am also thinking about finding his naturalization documents (which should occur between 1888 and 1896).
Third trip was in 1903. I am unable to identify person listed as his wife Maria. But on the margin of that ship list is information that Frank is traveling to his brother-in-law Jacob Jachy (Jacob married sister of Eva Duszynska - first wife of Frank). So this information is connecting without doubt that this Frank Maryanski is "my" Frank.
And I am also certain, that Frank, which married Eva Duszynska in 1886 is the same Frank which married my grandmother Petronella in 1896. I have both marriage acts, so for sure there is no mistake.

Sad that there is no way to get documents from internet databases. I will try to make a request by mail for the records from the New Jersey department of health, but I need to figure out the way of payment, which may be difficult from Poland Smile.
Thank for that advice.

And last thing. Once I managed to get in touch on Facebook with Robert (Bob) Maryanski, son of Edward Maryanski, grandson of John Maryanski, great-grandson of Frank Maryanski. But John Maryanski died in 1918 before Edward was born, so Robert could not help me much.
It is very hard for me to identify from Poland descendants of Frank and contact with them. I am trying to do it for many years but without luck so far. But I don't gave up Smile.



Quote:
Hi Zbigniew & Cynthia,

The Polish parish in Bayonne was Our Lady of Mt. Carmel (founded 1898). It merged with two other parishes and is now the parish of St. John Paul II. Here is a link to the parish information: http://www.johnpaul2parish.com/
Family Search has films for baptisms and marriages for Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. Unfortunately, they are able to be viewed only at a Family History Center or an accredited public library. Here is a link to the Family Search records: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/295831?availability=Family%20History%20Library
It would seem to me that the easiest way to request death and burial records from the church would be write or email the parish directly. Marriage & baptism records could be obtained from the parish or from Family Search. Given the names of the parish priests and their religious order it would seem that contact could be made either in English or in Polish. Parish records for Ewa would be a bit more difficult to find. The Polish parish was founded in 1898 and the question is what parish/parishes did Poles attend prior to that time? It was common practice for Poles to attend an English speaking parish (or an ethnic parish such as German, Italian, etc. until they were able to organize their own ethnic parish). Perhaps the priests at St. John Paul II parish could help with that information.

For what it is worth, according to Wacław Kruszka’s Historya Polska w Ameryce, the parish was founded in 1894 rather than in 1898. Part of the difficulty in determining relevant facts is that those years were about the same time when Hodur broke with the Roman Catholic Church and founded the Polish National Catholic Church. (There also is a Polish National Catholic parish in Bayonne.) Kruszka’s work is available online from the Harvard University Library at this link: https://digitalcollections.library.harvard.edu/catalog/990056612550203941 The parish in Bayonne is found in Tom 13 Rozdzial VI pages 75 & 76 (sequence 2326 & 2327).

I hope this information is helpful to your research.

Pozdrawiam z Indiany,

Dawid


Thank You Dawid for all informations provided.
With Eva it is interesting, that she is not burried in family grave on Holy Name Catholic Cementery in New Jersey. In fact I could not find her grave in Find a Grave database.
I will try to contact the parish directly as You advise.

Thank You once again for help provided.
If anyone have more tips or informations, I will be gratefull for sharing them with me.

Regards,
Zbigniew Maryanski
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dnowicki
PO Top Contributor


Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Replies: 1946
Location: Michigan City, Indiana

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Post Posted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 9:30 am      Post subject:
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Zbyhu wrote:


Thank You Dawid for all informations provided.
With Eva it is interesting, that she is not burried in family grave on Holy Name Catholic Cementery in New Jersey. In fact I could not find her grave in Find a Grave database.
I will try to contact the parish directly as You advise.

Thank You once again for help provided.
If anyone have more tips or informations, I will be gratefull for sharing them with me.

Regards,
Zbigniew Maryanski


Hi Zbigniew,

It would not be unusual for all family members not to be buried in the same family plot. Catholic cemeteries during the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, especially in urban areas, had two types of burial plots, “perpetual care” plots and “term” graves. An easy way to explain the difference is that perpetual care plots were purchased by a family (or individual) and were, as the made suggests, permanent. The purchase of such graves was like any other real estate transaction—the purchaser owned the plot, received a deed (title) to the plot, could sell an unused and unwanted portion of the plot, the cemetery was obligated to maintain the plot, etc. Such graves were relatively expensive since they obligated the cemetery to maintain the plot in perpetuity. Term graves were “rented” for a specific number of years, often 25 years. The renter did not “own” the grave but was only granted use of the grave for the time specified. When the term expired relatives of the deceased were given the option of either purchasing a perpetual care plot and having the remains transferred to the new lot or doing nothing. Whichever option the relatives decided upon, eventually the cemetery removed all grave markers (headstones), usually added soil to the top of the former term grave section and eventually used the section for new burials.

As a summer job when I was in high school I worked at Holy Cross Cemetery in Calumet City, a suburb of Chicago. During the time I worked at the cemetery, the terms of two large sections of adult term graves and three large sections of baby and infant term graves had expired and the sections were being prepared for new burials. The adult sections have still not been reused, but the baby sections have been reused and now are the sites of permanent burial plots. At that time the last of the terms had expired and the process I described was taking place. Transfers of remains to permanent plots were a much more rare occurrence than the option of doing nothing. Both my paternal and maternal ancestors were buried in Holy Cross. My paternal grandfather died in 1920 at age 37 and since my grandmother had three young children to care for she could only afford a term grave. By the time the term had expired my grandmother had died and was buried in a two grave permanent plot next to her second husband. My father and his sisters just let the term expire and so now the exact location of my grandfather’s burial cannot be found. (I do have a fairly good idea of the location of his grave since my father pointed it out in relation to a large, old oak tree.) My maternal great-grandfather was also buried in a term grave when he died in 1902. Again, that was all my great-grandmother could afford at the time. (She had six minor children to care for.) She never remarried and before her death purchased a perpetual care family plot and had her husband’s remained transferred to that plot.

Perhaps the practice I described was what took place in the case of Ewa. Perhaps it was for financial reasons that she may have been buried in a term grave. If that were the case, there likely is no grave marker for her and possibly none of her descendants are aware of the location of her grave. By extension, it is likely that no one created a memorial for her on Find A Grave which would explain why she is not found in the database.

I offer these thoughts for your consideration.

Wishing you success,

Dave
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