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Latin records translations
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rciecwierz



Joined: 10 Sep 2020
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Post Posted: Tue Sep 22, 2020 1:13 pm      Post subject: Baptism record
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Sadly I cannot find the origin of this record, but I believe it to be in Latin. The record of interest to me is the last entry on the attached page.

Most grateful for your help in translating this into English.
Best regards
Roman



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Wed Sep 23, 2020 8:31 am      Post subject: Re: Baptism record
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rciecwierz wrote:
Sadly I cannot find the origin of this record, but I believe it to be in Latin. The record of interest to me is the last entry on the attached page.

Most grateful for your help in translating this into English.
Best regards
Roman


Roman,

Here is the translation.

Dave

C.1: Place of Birth: Błąkowanie
Notation in C.1: Extracted
C.2: Number (of baptisms for the year): 79
C.3: Legitimate (Males): 38
C.4: Legitimate (Females): Blank
C.5: Illegitimate (Males): Blank
C.6: Illegitimate (Females): BlankC.7: Notation of the one baptizing in the year 1825: On the same day (i.e. July 17) Rev. Józefat Krokowski, a Carmelite* baptized an infant to whom was given a double name, Heliodor** Józef, born on the 3rd day of June*** at 11 PM, the son of the legitimate marital union of Wawrzyniec Bilgart and Maryanna née Piechowska. The sponsors were Józef Maniszewski and Maryanna Koc???kowa****

Notes: *Carmel/Carmelite: The priest was a member of the Carmelite religious order.
**Heliodor (Polish version of the name). It was the name of a rather obscure 4th Century saint, Heliodorus of Altino, who was a contemporary of the much better known and historically significant St. Jerome and St. Augustine (of Hippo). The name certainly never made a list of popular names either in Polish or in English.
***die 3 Jui: Jui could stand for either Junii or Julii (June or July) and there is no way of determining which from the text.
****-owa: The suffix was used for a married woman
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adame24



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Post Posted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 1:44 am      Post subject:
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Can I please obtain some assistance in translating both of these birth records. One should be from 1875 and the other 1881. I understand that they are longer and thus I would like to provide a donation to cover the translators time.


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marcelproust
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Post Posted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:04 am      Post subject:
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adame24 wrote:
Can I please obtain some assistance in translating both of these birth records. One should be from 1875 and the other 1881. I understand that they are longer and thus I would like to provide a donation to cover the translators time.

These documents are written in russian.

***


13
Brudzyno

It happened in the village of Góra, on November 5th/18th 1900, at 2 p.m.
We make it known that in the presence of the witnesses: Jan Zjarko, 56 years old and Jan Krupczyński, 40 years old, both servants, who live in Brudzyno, a religious marriage was concluded, on this day, between:

Feliks Zjadewicz, a single man, 24 years old, servant, living in Brudzyno, who was born in this village, son of the late spoues: Michał Zjadewicz and Rozalia Zjadewicz nee Szlązakowska, peasants, who lived in Brudzyno

and

Julianna Borasińska, a miss, 19 years old, living at her parents' in Brudzyno, who was born in this village, daughter of the spouses: Adam Borasiński and Eleonora Borasińska nee Przedpełska, peasants, who live in Brudzyno.

This marriage was preceded by the three banns of marriage, announced in the parish church of Góra, on: October 15th/28th, October 22th/November 4th and October 29th/November 11th of the current year.

Bride's parents gave oral permission for this marriage.
Religious marriage ceremony was celebrated by the priest Antoni Rumianowski, administrator of the parish of Góra.
This act was read to the newlyweds and the witnesses, all illiterate and was signed by Us.

Administrator of the parish of Góra, serving as Civil Registrar.
Priest A. Rumianowski.

__________________

Nr 11
Brudzyno

It happened in the village of Góra, on February 22nd/March 6th 1881, at 2 p.m.
Appeared personally Adam Borasiński, peasant, 38 years old, living in Brudzyno, in the presence of Franciszek Karwowski, 50 years old and Wojciech Karwowski, 30 years old, both workers, who live in Brudzyno, and presented us a female infant child, informing that the child was born in Brudzyno, on February 20th/March 4th of the current year, at 10 p.m., with his legal wife Eleonora nee Przedpełska, 36 years old.
At The Holy Baptism, held today by the priest Ferdynand Kroczewski, the child was given the name: Julianna, and the godparents were: Józef Brudzyński, farmer, who lives in Brudzyno and Julianna Brudzyńska.
This act was read to the declarant and the witnesses, all illiterate and was signed by Us only.
Administrator of the parish of Góra, serving as Civil Registrar, priest Ferdynand Kroczewski.

__________________

Nr 66
Brudzyno

It happened in the village of Góra, on August 8th/20th 1875, at 11 a.m.
Appeared: Józefa Ślązakowska, midwife, 60 years old, living in Brudzyno, in the presence of Feliks Szachnowski, 35 years old and Leon Żabowski, 45 years old, both workers, who live in Brudzyno, and presented Us, a male infant child, informing, that the child was born yesterday in Brudzyno, at 1 a.m., with: Michał Zjadewicz, 54 years old, worker, who lived in Brudzyno, who died on May 4th/16th of the current year and with his legal wife Rozalia nee Słomiak, 35 years old.
At The Holy Baptism, held today, by the priest Ferdynand Kroczewski, the child was given the name: Feliks, and the godparents were: aforementioned Feliks Szachnowski and Leokadia Szachnowska.
This act was read to the present and due to their illiteracy it was signed by Us only.
Administrator of the parish of Góra, serving as Civil Registrar, priest Ferdynand Kroczewski.

_________________
please remember that my translations are volunteering so whenever you want to send money remember that this is a gift, not a payment.
PAYPAL: [email protected]


Last edited by marcelproust on Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:36 am; edited 3 times in total
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adame24



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Post Posted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:11 am      Post subject:
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Thank you, Marcel. I will move them over to the Russian thread. Can you help translate? If so I will send you a donation.
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marcelproust
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Post Posted: Thu Oct 01, 2020 2:12 am      Post subject:
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adame24 wrote:
Thank you, Marcel. I will move them over to the Russian thread. Can you help translate? If so I will send you a donation.


Yes, i am working on it.

_________________
please remember that my translations are volunteering so whenever you want to send money remember that this is a gift, not a payment.
PAYPAL: [email protected]
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myonick



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Post Posted: Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:12 pm      Post subject: Marriage record for Jan Dziedzic and Maria Badura
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I had research done on my family through Polish Origins and received many records.
One of which was a marriage record ( see attached ) for Jan Dziedzic and Maria Badura. I would like to have this record translated. Thank you for your time
Mary



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:38 pm      Post subject: Re: Marriage record for Jan Dziedzic and Maria Badura
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myonick wrote:
I had research done on my family through Polish Origins and received many records.
One of which was a marriage record ( see attached ) for Jan Dziedzic and Maria Badura. I would like to have this record translated. Thank you for your time
Mary


Hi Mary,

The column headings as they appear here may or may not match exactly with those of the record you have. During the 19th Century the Austrian government changed the wording several times and without seeing those headings I cannot say that they are a match with these on the template I use for such translations. However, if they are not an exact match they do match the sense of the info found in the columns.

Since I do not know the name of the parish where this record was composed I have no way to verify the names of two places found in the record. The places are my best guess of the handwritten names.

Here follows the translation.

Wishing you successful researching,

Dave

The marriage record is entered in the columnar format with major divisions and subdivisions of the columns.

Col. 1: Series = Number (of the marriage for the year): 5
Col. 2: Year at top: Dies et Mensis = Day & Month (of Marriage): October 17, 1865
Col. 3: SPONSUS = GROOM
Col. 3a: Numerus Domus = Number of the House: 25 (of the groom) & 52 (of the bride)
Col. 3b: NOMEN = NAME: Jan Dziedzic, a farmer, the legitimate son of Grzegorz Dziedzic and of Magdalena née Zyła, farmers
Col. 3c: Religio = Religion
Col. 3c1: Catholica = Catholic: Checked
Col. 3c2: Aut alia = Or other: Blank
Col. 3d: Aetas = Age: 22
Col. 3e: Caelebs = Bachelor: Checked
Col. 3f: Viduus = Widower: Blank
Notation in Cols. 3-4b: Permission from the court in Wadomic(?) dated October 6, 1865 Number 9858 and the consent of the minors and orphans court at Kalbrazyna(?) dated October 17, 1865 Number 2341
Col. 4: SPONSA = BRIDE
Col. 4a: NOMEN = NAME: Marya, the legitimate daughter of the late Stanisław Badura and of Katarzyna née Kapusta, farmers
Col. 4b: Religio = Religion
Col. 4b1: Catholica = Catholic: Checked
Col. 4b2: Aut alia = Or other: Blank
Col. 4c: Aetas = Age: 15
Col. 4d: Caelebs = Maiden/Bachelorette: Checked
Col. 4e: Vidua = Widow: Blank
Col. 5: TESTES et eorum Conditio = WITNESSES and their status/ condition of life/occupation: Tomasz Starowicz (&) Piotr Dyrga, farmers
Notation in Cols. 4b-5: (In Polish) I, the undersigned guardian of the underage Marya Badura and I, the father of Jan Dziedzic, grant permission to her to enter into the bonds of marriage with Jan Dziedzic. And in testimony of this sign with the mark of the cross in the presence of trustworthy witnesses.
+Józef Worek, guardian
+Jan Dziedzic, father*

Note: This is a scribal error. The name of the father of Jan Dziedzic is Grzegorz, not Jan.
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myonick



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Post Posted: Thu Oct 08, 2020 7:42 am      Post subject: Marriage record for Jan Dziedzic and Maria Badura
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Thank you for the translation. I thought it had something to do with the age of Maria Badura at the time of the marriage, but I needed to make sure.
Also, it verifies the information my dad told me many years back.
Thank you Mary
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TedMack



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Post Posted: Fri Oct 16, 2020 6:20 am      Post subject: Latin Baptism Translations
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G'day

Can you assist in translating these Baptism records please.



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Post Posted: Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:46 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin Baptism Translations
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TedMack wrote:
G'day

Can you assist in translating these Baptism records please.


Hi Ted,

A few preliminaries before getting to the translations...Latin records are either ecclesiastical records or civil transcripts of those records. The Council of Trent mandated the keeping of ecclesiastical records of baptisms and marriages (and later of burials) as one of the Catholic Church’s responses to the Protestant Reformation. There was a lag time between the decree of the Council and its implementation but by about 1600 parishes in Poland were keeping such records. The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth aka The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Latin: Regnum Poloniae Magnusque Ducatus Lithuaniae; Polish: Królestwo Polskie i Wielkie Księstwo Litewskie) had no state system for the keeping of civil vital records and thus ecclesiastical sacramental records were accepted in place of civil records.

Prior to the Partitions, Rychnów was part of woj. kaliskie of the Commonwealth. In 1793 during the Second Partition the area was seized by Prussia and became part of the Province of South Prussia (German: Südpreußen; Polish: Prusy Południowe). Following Napoleon’s victories in the War of the Fourth Coalition (1806-1807) and the treaties of Tilsit (Polish: Tylża), the area became part of the Department of Bydgoszcz within the Duchy of Warsaw (Księstwo Warszawskie), a newly formed French client state. Following the defeat of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna in 1815 control of the region was given to Russia and became part of the Congress Kingdom of Poland (Kongresowe Królestwo Polskie). Those political changes in turn changed the language in which records were kept. From 1793 until 1807 Prussia used transcripts of the Latin church records as civil vital stats. Beginning in 1808 the language shifted to Polish and the style to the Napoleonic long paragraph type of record.

For Latin records it is extremely helpful to provide at least the geographical context of the record in order to facilitate receiving a more complete translation of the record. This is in keeping with the second point of the guidelines posted by Zenon and the PO team: "2. If you managed to decipher only a few words ask for assistance in understanding the remaining part of the record. Even if you didn’t manage to read a single word by yourself, provide ALL the information that you already know from the document (who, what, where, when, name of the parish the record was found, religion, etc.); especially if it’s been indexed." (link: https://polishorigins.com/records-translations-guidelines/ This brings me to a comment on the images you posted. Although a link to the record usually makes it easier to put the request into context and makes it easier to read records where the ink is faded, this would not have helped with the records you posted since they need to be viewed at a Family History Center or affiliated library and that was not an option I would find helpful. I don’t know how you copied the images you posted but I have a suggestion for any future records from Family Search. When you find the page you want just click on “Download” and save the entire page. If you can post the entire page, that is great. If you can’t, it at least provides a copy which can easily be enhanced to increase the legibility of faded handwriting. Four or five years ago that was not so important to me but it is now as eyesight is no longer what it once was.

Some background on Rychnów...The Słownik geograficzny...usually provides background info which can enhance one’s knowledge of the region where one’s ancestors lived. Here is a link to the entry in the Słownik and to info about the parish church where the baptisms took place: http://dir.icm.edu.pl/pl/Slownik_geograficzny/Tom_X/72
Highlights: Rychnów was a village and a manorial farmstead and the site of a parish church. In 1827 the village had 38 houses with a population of 311. The number of souls/adults in the parish was 620. In 1755 a storm damaged the parish church and a new wooden church was erected in 1782, funded by the nobles who owned the village. That building is still the contemporary parish church and is under the title of All Saints. Here is a link to parish info and a picture of the church: https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parafia_Wszystkich_%C5%9Awi%C4%99tych_w_Rychnowie

A final tidbit regarding surnames (and, in particular maiden names of women)...You’ll notice that not every person listed in the records you posted was recorded with a surname. Not all Christian peasants in Poland had/used surnames during the 18th Century, although many did. Also, sometimes surnames tended to be fluid even into the first decades of the 19th Century and it was not all that unusual for individuals to change their surname. When you consider the number of adults in the villages of the parish of Rychnów it is easy to understand how surnames were not all that necessary to accurately identify individuals. You posted about variants of the given name of a woman’s father serving as her patronymic maiden name. It is difficult to say that the variant was her maiden name. It may simply have served to identify her in terms of her relationship to her father. It certainly would not have been his surname. Examples of identifying a married woman in terms of a relationship are found in the images you posted such as “Ewa, the wife of Stanisław”. Nothing there is acting as a surname.

Anyway, I hope you find all this helpful and, hopefully, interesting.

Here follows the main event—the translations.

Wishing you success,

Dave


Left Col. 25 May
Body of Entry: Rychnów. In the same year I, the same who (is named) above, baptized an infant by the name of Feliks, the son of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Andrzej and Maryanna Mackowski. The sponsors** were Ewa, the wife of Stanisław, with Andrzej, a young man/bachelor.

Notes: * laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to describe a person as a peasant.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.


Left Col. 23 (probably part of the date. The month is cut off in the image. Based on the part of the bottom of the image which is cropped the year should be 1759 and the month is likely December.)
Body of Entry: I baptized Andrzej (born) of the legitimate marital union of Maciej, a cottager*, and of Katarzyna. The sponsors** were Marcin Hal??? and Barbara, a servant (illegible), all from Rychnów.

Notes: *The priest here used the Polish chałupnik instead of the Latin coterius or tugurius for cottager. During the time of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, known as the Republic of the Two Nations (Polish: Rzeczpostpolita Obojga Narodów) the social/economic status of peasants was broken down into various divisions based on property or lack thereof. The top class of peasant was a cmetho (Latin) or kmieć (Polish) who had his own cottage and enough farm land to be self-sufficient. At the bottom of the hierarchy of peasantry were those who had no real property and lived with and worked for others. In this record Barbara fell into that group as she lived and worked as a servant (Latin: famula; Polish: służąca). A cottager fell at the bottom of propertied peasants since his real property consisted of the cottage in which he and his family resided. It was always possible for an individual to work his way up the ladder but it was also possible for his status to go in the opposite direction.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.


Rychnów.
On the 15th day of November in the same year, I, the same who (is named) above, baptized an infant by the name of Marcin, the son of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Andrzej and Maryanna Mackowski. The sponsors** were Jan, a farmhand, and Zofia, the wife of Jan Ławnik***, all from the same village.

Notes: * laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to describe a person as a peasant.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.
*** Ławnik: It is difficult to say whether this was a surname or a description of social position like Chałupnik in the previous entry. Ławnik has its root in the word ława (bench) and can be translated as “bencher”.. According to Hoffman and in Linde’s dictionary, a ławnik was a town councilor, alderman, assessor, juror. The Słownik Warszawski gives as one of the meanings of ławnik “sędzia z ludu” (a judge from the people). As far as I can tell, a ławnik in a village during the days of the Commonwealth was a villager who acted as a judge or mediator in minor village disputes. The bottom line is that Jan’s surname may have been Ławnik or that may simply have been a description of his social position in the village. Linde’s dictionary, Słownik języka polskiego, was the first major dictionary of the Polish language and was published in 1807-14 in Warsaw and thus is a good source for the meaning of words as they were used during the late 18th & the early 19th Centuries. The Słownik Warszawski dates from the late 19th & early 20th Centuries and is an excellent source for words as they were used during that period.
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TedMack



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Post Posted: Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:37 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin Baptism Translations
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dnowicki wrote:
TedMack wrote:
G'day

Can you assist in translating these Baptism records please.


Hi Ted,

A few preliminaries before getting to the translations...Latin records are either ecclesiastical records or civil transcripts of those records. The Council of Trent mandated the keeping of ecclesiastical records of baptisms and marriages (and later of burials) as one of the Catholic Church’s responses to the Protestant Reformation. There was a lag time between the decree of the Council and its implementation but by about 1600 parishes in Poland were keeping such records. The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth aka The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Latin: Regnum Poloniae Magnusque Ducatus Lithuaniae; Polish: Królestwo Polskie i Wielkie Księstwo Litewskie) had no state system for the keeping of civil vital records and thus ecclesiastical sacramental records were accepted in place of civil records.

Prior to the Partitions, Rychnów was part of woj. kaliskie of the Commonwealth. In 1793 during the Second Partition the area was seized by Prussia and became part of the Province of South Prussia (German: Südpreußen; Polish: Prusy Południowe). Following Napoleon’s victories in the War of the Fourth Coalition (1806-1807) and the treaties of Tilsit (Polish: Tylża), the area became part of the Department of Bydgoszcz within the Duchy of Warsaw (Księstwo Warszawskie), a newly formed French client state. Following the defeat of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna in 1815 control of the region was given to Russia and became part of the Congress Kingdom of Poland (Kongresowe Królestwo Polskie). Those political changes in turn changed the language in which records were kept. From 1793 until 1807 Prussia used transcripts of the Latin church records as civil vital stats. Beginning in 1808 the language shifted to Polish and the style to the Napoleonic long paragraph type of record.

For Latin records it is extremely helpful to provide at least the geographical context of the record in order to facilitate receiving a more complete translation of the record. This is in keeping with the second point of the guidelines posted by Zenon and the PO team: "2. If you managed to decipher only a few words ask for assistance in understanding the remaining part of the record. Even if you didn’t manage to read a single word by yourself, provide ALL the information that you already know from the document (who, what, where, when, name of the parish the record was found, religion, etc.); especially if it’s been indexed." (link: https://polishorigins.com/records-translations-guidelines/ This brings me to a comment on the images you posted. Although a link to the record usually makes it easier to put the request into context and makes it easier to read records where the ink is faded, this would not have helped with the records you posted since they need to be viewed at a Family History Center or affiliated library and that was not an option I would find helpful. I don’t know how you copied the images you posted but I have a suggestion for any future records from Family Search. When you find the page you want just click on “Download” and save the entire page. If you can post the entire page, that is great. If you can’t, it at least provides a copy which can easily be enhanced to increase the legibility of faded handwriting. Four or five years ago that was not so important to me but it is now as eyesight is no longer what it once was.

Some background on Rychnów...The Słownik geograficzny...usually provides background info which can enhance one’s knowledge of the region where one’s ancestors lived. Here is a link to the entry in the Słownik and to info about the parish church where the baptisms took place: http://dir.icm.edu.pl/pl/Slownik_geograficzny/Tom_X/72
Highlights: Rychnów was a village and a manorial farmstead and the site of a parish church. In 1827 the village had 38 houses with a population of 311. The number of souls/adults in the parish was 620. In 1755 a storm damaged the parish church and a new wooden church was erected in 1782, funded by the nobles who owned the village. That building is still the contemporary parish church and is under the title of All Saints. Here is a link to parish info and a picture of the church: https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parafia_Wszystkich_%C5%9Awi%C4%99tych_w_Rychnowie

A final tidbit regarding surnames (and, in particular maiden names of women)...You’ll notice that not every person listed in the records you posted was recorded with a surname. Not all Christian peasants in Poland had/used surnames during the 18th Century, although many did. Also, sometimes surnames tended to be fluid even into the first decades of the 19th Century and it was not all that unusual for individuals to change their surname. When you consider the number of adults in the villages of the parish of Rychnów it is easy to understand how surnames were not all that necessary to accurately identify individuals. You posted about variants of the given name of a woman’s father serving as her patronymic maiden name. It is difficult to say that the variant was her maiden name. It may simply have served to identify her in terms of her relationship to her father. It certainly would not have been his surname. Examples of identifying a married woman in terms of a relationship are found in the images you posted such as “Ewa, the wife of Stanisław”. Nothing there is acting as a surname.

Anyway, I hope you find all this helpful and, hopefully, interesting.

Here follows the main event—the translations.

Wishing you success,

Dave


Left Col. 25 May
Body of Entry: Rychnów. In the same year I, the same who (is named) above, baptized an infant by the name of Feliks, the son of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Andrzej and Maryanna Mackowski. The sponsors** were Ewa, the wife of Stanisław, with Andrzej, a young man/bachelor.

Notes: * laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to describe a person as a peasant.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.


Left Col. 23 (probably part of the date. The month is cut off in the image. Based on the part of the bottom of the image which is cropped the year should be 1759 and the month is likely December.)
Body of Entry: I baptized Andrzej (born) of the legitimate marital union of Maciej, a cottager*, and of Katarzyna. The sponsors** were Marcin Hal??? and Barbara, a servant (illegible), all from Rychnów.

Notes: *The priest here used the Polish chałupnik instead of the Latin coterius or tugurius for cottager. During the time of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, known as the Republic of the Two Nations (Polish: Rzeczpostpolita Obojga Narodów) the social/economic status of peasants was broken down into various divisions based on property or lack thereof. The top class of peasant was a cmetho (Latin) or kmieć (Polish) who had his own cottage and enough farm land to be self-sufficient. At the bottom of the hierarchy of peasantry were those who had no real property and lived with and worked for others. In this record Barbara fell into that group as she lived and worked as a servant (Latin: famula; Polish: służąca). A cottager fell at the bottom of propertied peasants since his real property consisted of the cottage in which he and his family resided. It was always possible for an individual to work his way up the ladder but it was also possible for his status to go in the opposite direction.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.


Rychnów.
On the 15th day of November in the same year, I, the same who (is named) above, baptized an infant by the name of Marcin, the son of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Andrzej and Maryanna Mackowski. The sponsors** were Jan, a farmhand, and Zofia, the wife of Jan Ławnik***, all from the same village.

Notes: * laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to describe a person as a peasant.
**patrini/sponsors: the official title of the individuals who are commonly known as godparents.
*** Ławnik: It is difficult to say whether this was a surname or a description of social position like Chałupnik in the previous entry. Ławnik has its root in the word ława (bench) and can be translated as “bencher”.. According to Hoffman and in Linde’s dictionary, a ławnik was a town councilor, alderman, assessor, juror. The Słownik Warszawski gives as one of the meanings of ławnik “sędzia z ludu” (a judge from the people). As far as I can tell, a ławnik in a village during the days of the Commonwealth was a villager who acted as a judge or mediator in minor village disputes. The bottom line is that Jan’s surname may have been Ławnik or that may simply have been a description of his social position in the village. Linde’s dictionary, Słownik języka polskiego, was the first major dictionary of the Polish language and was published in 1807-14 in Warsaw and thus is a good source for the meaning of words as they were used during the late 18th & the early 19th Centuries. The Słownik Warszawski dates from the late 19th & early 20th Centuries and is an excellent source for words as they were used during that period.




Thank you so much for this wonderful information. I will take on board the requirement to show the full page to assist with any further documents I locate.

Once again thank you.
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a4u2fear



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Post Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:01 am      Post subject:
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hi dave im back!

hope you are well.

I need some help with latin again of course. I think but can't be sure these are "anniversaries"

The one document I need translated are both entries from 1763 (bottom left)

The other is near the bottom right (third entry #3).

These are from Berg, Germersheim, Germany 1760s



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Post Posted: Mon Oct 19, 2020 6:37 am      Post subject:
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a4u2fear wrote:
hi dave im back!

hope you are well.

I need some help with latin again of course. I think but can't be sure these are "anniversaries"

The one document I need translated are both entries from 1763 (bottom left)

The other is near the bottom right (third entry #3).

These are from Berg, Germersheim, Germany 1760s


Hi Andrew,

Good to see you are back.

The entries on these pages record bequests made to the parish church in Berg. I recognize the names of the individuals in the entries at the bottom of the left page from earlier records you posted. I’ll translate the important stuff but will skip the flowery language about pious memory and the like. These two entries record bequests/legacies provided for Masses to be celebrated yearly in perpetuity on the 7th of September.
On May 15, 1763 Anna Maria née Heberin, the widow of Christopher Harder, the late miller in Berg bequeathed the sum of 25 florins to the parish to have Masses offered each year for the repose of the soul of her late husband on September 7, the anniversary of his death.
On the same day Anna Maria bequeathed an additional 25 florins to the parish to have two Masses offered yearly on the same date for her intention during her lifetime with the additional stipulation that after her death the Masses be offered yearly in perpetuity for the repose of her soul. A sentence was added at a later date recording her death. The sentence reads in Latin “Haec pie in Domino obdormivit die 12 mensis Aprilis 1765.” The translation: “She piously fell asleep in the Lord on the 12th day of the month of April 1765.”

Before I do anything with entry #3 I want to make sure that the individuals in the entry are of interest to you. I don’t recognize the names of the individuals in the entry. All the entries on that page are from the year 1760. The Anna Maria cannot be the same person as the Anna Maria née Heberin, the widow of Christopher Harder, since this Anna Maria was the widow of Michael Lederle. who then was married to Michael Fried.

A short Latin instruction...The verb lego, legere, legi, lectum (to collect, to read) and the verb lego, legare, legavi, legatum (to appoint, to leave a legacy, to bequeath) can lead a young Latin scholar astray because they appear somewhat similar. They belong to two distinct conjugations and actually are not similar. The form found in the entries on the two pages is the First Conjugation lego, legare and is used because the entries are dealing with bequests and legacies.

An off the wall thought...What really is the meaning of perpetuum? In the world of words it is an Accusative of Duration of Time of the adjective perpetuus and it means continuously, in perpetuity, or in other words, forever. But what does it mean in the world of time and space? How long is in perpetuity? If you went to the parish church in Berg on Sept. 7, 2021 would a Mass still be offered for the repose of the soul of Christopher Harder? Or does “in perpetuity” not last for more the 250 years?

Let me know about entry #3.

Dave


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Post Posted: Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:45 am      Post subject:
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Dave,

Yes I can confirm they are of interest but are not directly related to the other entry. The Lederle's are another grandparent. Theobald Lederle is the child of Michael Lederle and Anna Maria (nee unknown). I saw both names here and thought it could be of importance. The writing is fading so I'm sure it makes it very difficult so I apologize.

I still need to review the first anniversary notes you provided and I very much thank you.

Andrew
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