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Latin records translations
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:41 pm      Post subject: Re: 1845 Marriage record from Kanna
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ksmets wrote:
I need another pair of eyes to look at this record. Most importantly, I cannot read the bride's last name, nor the sentence underneath the data. But there are also a few other words I cannot make out. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Kristine


Year: 1845
Month and day: 19 May
SPONSUS
Nrus domus (house number): 50
Nomen: Joannes Gadek, fil. Josephi et Agatha Rys, [???] viduus [???] Marian. Natae Kobas hoc def [???].
Religio: Catholica
Ætas: 42
Viduus
SPONSA
Nomen: Salomea fi. Michaely ??? [sth. dadek?] et Marianna natae Cichow, hortulanus, no. 29
Religio: Catholica
Ætas: 25
Cæleb.
TESTES
Adalbertus Rasie???:
Adamus Woźniák
hortulani


Kristine,

In the Gądek-Swiątek marriage the Latin regarding the groom reads in full form “Joannes Gądek filius Josephi et Agathae Rys hortulanorum viduus post Mariam natam Kobus hortulanus”. Regarding the bride, the Latin reads “Salomea filia Michaelis Swiątek et Mariannae natae Cichoń hortulanorum”. The number 29 is the house number of her parents where she lived prior to the wedding. The names in Polish are as Mike wrote except that the maiden name of the bride’s mother is not necessarily Cichońska but is more likely to be Cichoń, which is also a fairly common Polish surname.

The sentence towards the end of the record which begins with “Erga/in relation to…” and concludes with “N.19” deals with the legality of permission for the marriage. In English the notation reads “In relation to the permission of Pan (literally: Sir/Lord) Do…(not sure of his surname) see (the document) of May 1, 1845 Number 19.”
The final notation reads “Benedixi ego (illegible name), curatus” = “I, (illegible name), the curate, blessed (this marriage).”

The first notation is not of prime genealogical import but is important for an understanding of the social situation of peasants in 1845. 1848 is a watershed date in the history of Galicia/Austrian Poland in that it marks the year that the peasantry was emancipated from feudal obligations, one of which was the necessity of obtaining the permission of the landowner to enter into marriage. In this case, although Jan was a widower, he still needed permission from the local “Pan” to marry for a second time. 1848 was not a “magic year” in the sense that everything automatically changed that year. It took a while for the old customs to change everywhere, but that was the year that the law changed.

It is also worth noting that the older social/economic distinctions among the various classes of peasants also began to no longer be used after 1848. All the individuals in the record who appear as “hortulani/gardeners” were listed in terms of property ownership. A hortulanus was a peasant farmer who owned his cottage and sufficient land for a garden and possibly for some farm animals but not enough for fields for market crop production. In later records, including the Rusek marriage, the much less specific term “agricola/farmer”, which was not so tied to property ownership, came into vogue.

Hope this clarifies things a bit.

Dave
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mrpiano17



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Post Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:37 am      Post subject: Re: 1900 Marriage Record in Latin
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ksmets wrote:
Can someone help me with the groom's information on this marriage record.

What I can read is the following: Thomas Rusek, agr., viduus post Sophiam natam Zowda ...

It's the last word (or words) that I cannot figure out. I am also not a 100% sure of Sophia's last name. Zowda is not a name I can find in Hoffman's Polish Surnames.

I understand it means,
Quote:
Thomas Rusek, farmer, widower of the now defunct Sophia, born Zowda ...


Thank so much!

Kristine


Hi Again,

Zofia's last name is Zawada. This is a common name in this area. The last word is Kupienin (where Tomasz was born). I assume you are getting this record from the Kanna record books. Kupienin is a village to the East of Kanna/Bolesław, on the other side of Medrzechów.
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mestanton



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Post Posted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 10:52 am      Post subject: "Provisor ecclesiae" and "Extractus"
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Dave,

Please help translate and put into perspective these Latin terms used in Piaski parish records.

All I need on the Jacob Głowacki 1843 death record are the words "provisor ecclesaie" underlined in red. Do they mean a patron of the church? In the red box at the bottom, I do not need the the children's names and ages, but I do need the details that follow. This record is very detailed about the funeral with the dead body from the village with a crucifix, but it is difficult to put it all together and understand why so much information about the wealth of the person, and the funeral were given.

I just need help with the one word "Extractus" at the upper left corner of Szymon Budny's 1785 Piaski parish baptism record. The other records on this page and others do not have this notation, but I did find another example on another record several pages away. Is it the abstract of the birth or the parents' marriage or something else?

Thanks for your insights,

Marilyn



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 9:04 pm      Post subject: Re: "Provisor ecclesiae" and "Extractus"
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mestanton wrote:
Dave,

Please help translate and put into perspective these Latin terms used in Piaski parish records.

All I need on the Jacob Głowacki 1843 death record are the words "provisor ecclesaie" underlined in red. Do they mean a patron of the church? In the red box at the bottom, I do not need the the children's names and ages, but I do need the details that follow. This record is very detailed about the funeral with the dead body from the village with a crucifix, but it is difficult to put it all together and understand why so much information about the wealth of the person, and the funeral were given.

I just need help with the one word "Extractus" at the upper left corner of Szymon Budny's 1785 Piaski parish baptism record. The other records on this page and others do not have this notation, but I did find another example on another record several pages away. Is it the abstract of the birth or the parents' marriage or something else?

Thanks for your insights,

Marilyn


Hi Marilyn,

Here are translations of the highlighted sections of the two records along with an attempt to explain what exactly was going on in the funeral rites described in the record. The riches of the deceased and his generosity to the church are probably the reason why he got such an elaborate funeral. Why the priest felt compelled to spell out sums of money is anyone's guess.

Baptism Record
The word “extractum” attached to the record is simply a priest’s notation that an extract (i.e. a baptismal certificate) had been made at a later date---possibly for a marriage or for whatever other purposed Szymon needed proof of birth/baptism. It really has no importance for this entry per se.

The words “provisor ecclesiae” do mean a provider/supporter/patron of the church”. It would appear that he was generous to the parish which goes a long way towards explaining why he got a “deluxe” funeral service and death and burial record.

Red Box Text
Reliquit praeter substantium immobilem*, 2100 taleros** in ?? et aliquot centena apud debitores. Sepultus die 23 ejusdem mensis, id est Novembris, ad orientem ecclesiae in sublimiori loco cum omni solemnitate, fuit exportatum cadaver ex ipsa villa, exhortatio coram domo, preces coram duabus crucifixi figuris, vesperae in Ecclesia, absolutae, officium 3 nocturnorum, concio, Missa, et sermo ad sepulchrum habitur.
Besides unmovable possessions*, he left 2100 Thalers** in ?? and a certain number of cents (literally 100ths of a thaler) with bankers (literally with those under obligation [to hold funds secure]). He was buried on the 23rd of the same month, that is November, towards the East of the church in a more sublime/lofty place with every solemnity. The body was exported from the village itself, an exhortation at the home, prayers at two shrines of the Crucifixion, Vespers in the church, absolutions, the office of three nocturns, a sermon, Mass, and a sermon at the grave took place.

Notes: *substantium immobilem/unmovable possessions: real estate
**Thalers: a coin of the realm in Prussia (and Prussian Poland) until 1857.

In order to really understand the description of the funeral rites it is necessary to take into consideration the Polish funeral customs of the period as well as the pre-Vatican II Catholic funeral rites. The “eksporta” (in Polish) was the removal of the body of the deceased from the house and the procession transporting the body to the parish church. The priest would go to the home of the deceased where prayers would be said and the body sprinkled with holy water. In this case the prayers were accompanied by an “exhortation” at the home. As the procession went from the village where the deceased lived to the village where the parish church was located stops would usually be made at the wayside shrines which were common in Poland (cf. the attachment of a wayside shrine from Paniewek in Kujawsko-Pomorskie), where prayers were offered. In this case, two stops were made at shrines which contained a crucifix and prayers were said at those two stops. Vespers and the three nocturns refer to parts of the liturgy which were actually derived from the monastic “hours”. Vespers was one of the main offices of the monastic day. It took place in the late afternoon/early evening, depending on the season. The absolutions were not the same as absolution in Confession, but were prayers offered for the forgiveness of any sins the deceased had committed in life. The nocturns were part of the night prayers of monks which took place between Matins (the midnight office) and Lauds (morning prayers). The nocturns consisted of a number Psalms and prayers. The sermon took place between the end of nocturns and the beginning of the funeral Mass. After the Mass another sermon took place at the grave/tomb at the time of the burial/entombment.

Based on the content of the entry, it would appear that the funeral rites took place over the course of two days. I can’t swear to that but the description fits best with that scenario. In that interpretation, he died in the early evening of November 20 and the exportation and journey from the village to the church with stops for prayers at the wayside shrines took place in the afternoon of November 22. After the arrival at the church Vespers were celebrated around sunset. The body would have reposed in the church until the morning of November 23 when the office of Nocturns was celebrated in the morning as a prelude to the Requiem Mass. The Mass was celebrated preceded by a sermon. (Keep in mind that the rule for fasting before Communion in those days was from Midnight until after Mass was finished. The priest always had to fast from Midnight in order to receive Communion during the Mass and thus Mass was usually celebrated early in the day.) The actual burial took place on November 23 after Mass and another sermon at the place of burial/entombment.

A goodly portion of the funeral ritual as described in the record is very familiar to me from my grammar school days as a Mass server. The customary rituals used in Poland had been modified for use in urban America. In Chicago, where I grew up, the exportation did take place on the morning of the funeral. The priest, accompanied by the altar boys went to the funeral home before Mass for prayers and the blessing of the body with holy water. In our neighborhood there was a funeral home directly across from the church. This funeral home got the lion’s share of parish funerals probably due to its proximity to the church. Anyway, the priest led a funeral procession on foot across the street to the church where the office of Nocturns took place followed by the Mass, a sermon and the blessing of the body in the church. Then came the procession by automobile to the cemetery (a distance of about seven miles) where the final prayers and the actual burial took place. Of course, in grammar school I didn’t understand the meaning of the all the Latin words but by senior year of high school, after having taken Latin all through high school, I actually was able to understand the vast majority of the Latin being used in the funeral rituals. It was in my final year as an undergrad that the rituals were reformed and the language changed to the vernacular. After studying Latin as an undergrad it didn’t matter whether the ritual was in Latin or in English as there was no difficulty understanding both languages. However, in my opinion, changing the language to the vernacular (along with relaxing rules which no longer fit the times) was one of the best things to happen in the Catholic Church during the 1960s.

I hope all this helps with your understanding of the record. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

Dave



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mestanton



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Post Posted: Sun Jun 11, 2017 10:53 am      Post subject: Translations
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Dave,

Thank you for the translations.

The notation of "Extractum" signified that an abstract of the birth/baptism record was made, and this probably occurred when Szymon Budny remarried in a neighboring parish in 1822. In other parishes, I have seen this marginal notation with more details about the marriage in another parish.

The description of the funeral was a glimpse into past Polish funeral customs. I, too, remember the exhortation at the house of the deceased or at the funeral home, the procession to the church for the Requiem Mass, and then the procession to the cemetery for burial. In my family, it was a custom to send photos of the deceased person in Poland in the open casket. One such photo is of my great grandfather in an open casket suspended between two chairs in front of his house. His brother is holding a large crucifix, about seven feet tall, that was probably carried all the way to the church and cemetery where my great grandfather was buried in 1939.

Your insights are greatly appreciated.

Marilyn
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JE Gardolinski



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Post Posted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 1:46 am      Post subject: Help with mystery baptism registry
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Dear Colleagues,

I recently located the baptism registry of my great-grandmother (Marcella Witwicka, Pokropivnaya, 1862) but a larger mystery arose...As you can see from the picture, the original entry is invalidated and a second entry immediately underneath is made. In this one, she is now listed as illegitimate and father unknown. At the fisrt one, the father is listed as Josphus Witwicki.
There are two lines of text between the entries, I cannot decipher them. Maybe they offer some explanation why this was done. I would really appreciate if anyone would try to translate those for me!
Also, if anyone ever saw something like this, or can offer any explanations why this was done, I would be thankful.
There is still another piece to the mystery. The godmother indicated at the baptism is Josepha, wife from Joannis Witwicki. At Marcella's marriage register and at her sons baptism registers Joannis and Josepha Witwicki are mentioned as her parents!
I have no proof, but my theory is that Jan and Jozef Witwiki were brothers. Jan was married to Jozefa Krupinska, her sister Ludovica had an illegitimate child with Jozef and died some time after that. Jozef never recognized the daughter and his brother and sister-in-law (the godmather) raised the child as their own. Wow, we could make a movie from such a story...

Any suggestions are welcome! Thanks!

JE Gardolinski



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:09 pm      Post subject: Re: Help with mystery baptism registry
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JE Gardolinski wrote:
Dear Colleagues,

I recently located the baptism registry of my great-grandmother (Marcella Witwicka, Pokropivnaya, 1862) but a larger mystery arose...As you can see from the picture, the original entry is invalidated and a second entry immediately underneath is made. In this one, she is now listed as illegitimate and father unknown. At the fisrt one, the father is listed as Josphus Witwicki.
There are two lines of text between the entries, I cannot decipher them. Maybe they offer some explanation why this was done. I would really appreciate if anyone would try to translate those for me!
Also, if anyone ever saw something like this, or can offer any explanations why this was done, I would be thankful.
There is still another piece to the mystery. The godmother indicated at the baptism is Josepha, wife from Joannis Witwicki. At Marcella's marriage register and at her sons baptism registers Joannis and Josepha Witwicki are mentioned as her parents!
I have no proof, but my theory is that Jan and Jozef Witwiki were brothers. Jan was married to Jozefa Krupinska, her sister Ludovica had an illegitimate child with Jozef and died some time after that. Jozef never recognized the daughter and his brother and sister-in-law (the godmather) raised the child as their own. Wow, we could make a movie from such a story...

Any suggestions are welcome! Thanks!

JE Gardolinski


Hi JE Gardolinski,

As the record appears in your post I find that only roughly 50% of the words are legible. When I zoom in the clarity grows poorer. I would be happy to translate the notation if you could provide a better copy. The preferred option would be to provide the link to the location of the document. If you are not able to provide the link, the secondary option would be for you to enlarge and crop and enhance the notation before posting it again.

Sorry to bother you with this request but my eyesight is not what it once was.

Thank you,

Dave Nowicki
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mcdonald0517
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Post Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 1:50 pm      Post subject: Need help with some phrases and words
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Hi Dave,

I can make out the general idea of these two records, but several words escape me.

For the baptismal record:
1788, 25th day of ? . Priests name... baptized infant named Steven (? correct), son of laborer (? I think) Nicolai Zolnierzak and Dorothea legitimately married. Godparents are Marcin and Marianna Wisniewski.

I need the month, confirmation on the child's name, and any other important information I may have missed in my general interpretation. Oh, and I think the X's at bottom of the record actually belong to the next act. If I am not mistaken, the 'x' means still born or died shortly after birth. When I look at the whole page, the scribe placed an 'x' next to the village name. That is what makes me believe the x is for the next entry. What do you think?

For the death record:
1792, 3 April, I buried child named Eva (? I think) daughter of Nicolai and Dorothea Zolnierzak. Buried in cemetery section or grave 4?

Can you please confirm the name of the child and also let me know if I missed any relevant information?

Thank you so much!
Cynthia



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JE Gardolinski



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Post Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 2:29 pm      Post subject: Re: Help with mystery baptism registry
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dnowicki wrote:


Hi JE Gardolinski,

As the record appears in your post I find that only roughly 50% of the words are legible. When I zoom in the clarity grows poorer. I would be happy to translate the notation if you could provide a better copy. The preferred option would be to provide the link to the location of the document. If you are not able to provide the link, the secondary option would be for you to enlarge and crop and enhance the notation before posting it again.

Sorry to bother you with this request but my eyesight is not what it once was.

Thank you,

Dave Nowicki



Dear Dave,

Thanks for your reply!

The link to that register:

http://agadd.home.net.pl/metrykalia/301/sygn.%20660/pages/PL_1_301_660_0016.htm

However, the image quality is virtually the same. Hopefully you are able to decipher a few more words...I am curious to hear what you find of it.

Thanks again.

José E. Gardolinski

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Post Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 9:29 pm      Post subject: Re: Need help with some phrases and words
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mcdonald0517 wrote:
Hi Dave,

I can make out the general idea of these two records, but several words escape me.

For the baptismal record:
1788, 25th day of ? . Priests name... baptized infant named Steven (? correct), son of laborer (? I think) Nicolai Zolnierzak and Dorothea legitimately married. Godparents are Marcin and Marianna Wisniewski.

I need the month, confirmation on the child's name, and any other important information I may have missed in my general interpretation. Oh, and I think the X's at bottom of the record actually belong to the next act. If I am not mistaken, the 'x' means still born or died shortly after birth. When I look at the whole page, the scribe placed an 'x' next to the village name. That is what makes me believe the x is for the next entry. What do you think?

For the death record:
1792, 3 April, I buried child named Eva (? I think) daughter of Nicolai and Dorothea Zolnierzak. Buried in cemetery section or grave 4?

Can you please confirm the name of the child and also let me know if I missed any relevant information?

Thank you so much!
Cynthia


Hi Cynthia,

You get an A for effort in dealing with these two records. However, the accuracy of the birth translation is not quite on the same level, although, if you keep up the effort some day your Latin will be good enough to carry on a conversation with dead Romans (Ha. ha).

Both entries are records of the same child, Ewa, born in 1788 and died in 1792. The month of birth is December which was written with the Roman numeral for ten (X) as an abbreviation for December (Decem = ten) with the Genitive Singular ending -is. In full written form the word would appear as Decembris. The names of the months in our calendar from September through December are simply numbers---seven through ten---which were the early names of the months of the Roman Calendar before changes threw the numbers out of sequence with the actual position of those months in the year.

The child’s name appears in the record as “Hevam” (Accusative Case). It is another example of the pesky aspirate (“h”). The name sometimes appears in written Latin as “Eva” and sometimes as “Heva” but is actually the same given name. I can understand how you could see the first letter of the name as “St” rather than “H” but a word in the Latin text which makes it not possible to read the name as Steven is the word “Faemellam” which appears after “baptisavi”. Faemella means “little girl/young female” which renders Steven as an impossibility (unless, of course, you do like the mirror image of the song “A Boy Named Sue”. I don’t know whether a song like “A Girl Named Steve” would make it onto the Silver Dollar Survey.) Seriously, sometimes other words in the text do help to make meanings clear. “Laboriosus/industrious” is an adjective which designated an individual as a peasant. The Polish for the given names of the parents is Mikołaj and Dorota. The adjective “honestus”, which describes the male sponsor/godfather means “upright” and was usually used to describe a peasant farmer from a village or small town. The godfather’s given name is Pancratius in Latin, which is Pankracy in Polish, and the godmother is Maryanna Marcino(cut off letters).

Here is my translation: (Village of) Bulkowo
On the 25th day of December in the year 1788 I, Di??? Jagielski, C.V.(?---the letters stand for the religious order of which he was a member), baptized a little girl by the name Ewa, born yesterday in the evening of the legitimate marriage of the industrious Mikołaj and Dorota Zołnierzak. The sponsors were the upright Pankracy Wisniewski and Maryanna Marcino(cut off letters), both from the same (village, i.e. Bulkowo).

I’m not sure of the meaning of the xxx. Clues could be found, as you wrote, in other records.

You did a better job on the death record than on the birth record. Here is my translation:
(Village of) Golątkowo
On the third day of April 1792 I, who (is named) above, buried a child in the (parish) cemetery by the name of Ewa, four years of age, the daughter of the industrious Mikołaj and Dorota Zołnierzak.

Hope this clarifies things a bit.

Dave
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Post Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 1:05 pm      Post subject:
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Hi Dave,

Thank you so much for your help with the 2 records for Eva. I will add this knowledge to my ongoing list of "tips from Dave for translating Latin".

High school Latin may have been more interesting with your sense of humor Wink

I always learn from you, but I don't think I will be speaking with any dead Romans any time soon Wink

All the best,
Cynthia
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Post Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 8:38 pm      Post subject: Re: Help with mystery baptism registry
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[quote="JE Gardolinski"]
dnowicki wrote:




Dear Dave,

Thanks for your reply!

The link to that register:

http://agadd.home.net.pl/metrykalia/301/sygn.%20660/pages/PL_1_301_660_0016.htm

However, the image quality is virtually the same. Hopefully you are able to decipher a few more words...I am curious to hear what you find of it.

Thanks again.

José E. Gardolinski


Hello José,

You are certainly correct that the image in the link is no better than the image you posted but I was able to read enough of the words to give a free translation of the notation. The entry states that the prior entry is not valid and that the actual valid entry is the one which follows (where the father is listed as unknown). The reason given is that the information provided by the paternal uncle (the husband of the female sponsor/godmother) of the child does not sound true and accurate. Both entries and the notation were entered by Adam Szoski, the assistant priest of the parish. It would appear that at first the priest accepted the data which was provided but changed his mind upon further reflection. It is certain that the alleged father, Jόzef, was not the person providing the information nor was he present at the baptism. The custom was that the father of the child and the sponsors (or at least the male sponsor) made the arrangements for the baptism and were present for the ceremony. There is no explanation in the notation explaining the absence of Jόzef or the reason why his brother, Jan, who was the husband of the godmother/female sponsor but not the godfather/male sponsor, provided the information. One thing which is clear is that Jόzef and Ludwika were not married. Where was Jan is still a part of the mystery. It was normal that the mother of the child did not attend the baptism so her absence is no mystery. Perhaps your theory is correct in that Ludwika died and so Jan and his wife, Jόzefa, raised Marcela as their own.

The notation does not shed any light on what was going on with the father. The main contribution of the notation to the mystery is that the priest did not accept that Jόzef was the father or at least that the data, as it had been given, did not prove the paternity of Marcela.

That is about all I am able to contribute towards the solution.

Wishing you success in solving the mystery,

Dave
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Post Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:32 am      Post subject: Help with reading a name
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Greetings,

On the attached file, Line 28 , I am unsure of the first name of the father. It does not look like any name I have seen before. Everything else I can read.

Thanks

Dave



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Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:55 am      Post subject: Bzdziuch death record help
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Greetings!

I think I have most of the info on the attached...
Died 2 May 1878
Buried 4 May 1878
Michal Bzdziuch married to Agnes Lizak
pl.28.a.in ??
Catholic
Male
67 years
Died of pneumonia
sep?

I can't make out the line under my g.grandfather's name = "pl.28.1 in ??" and what this would mean.
Also the line under age and cause of death = "sep ???" is this the priest's name?

Thanks for the help!!

As an aside, scanning these death records reminds us how harsh life was in those times!

Joe

[edit] P.S. I just noticed I posted this in the wrong place...apologies.



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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:00 pm      Post subject: Re: Help with reading a name
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dshizak wrote:
Greetings,

On the attached file, Line 28 , I am unsure of the first name of the father. It does not look like any name I have seen before. Everything else I can read.

Thanks

Dave


Dave,

I don't know that anyone ever saw the name before as it is written. It appears to me to be spelled Voytechus, which is not a main stream Latin version of any Polish given name. First of all, the letters "y" and "z" were introduced into the Latin alphabet circa 50 B.C. and only appear in a limited number of Latin words---mainly words borrowed from Greek. Secondly, in in Classical Latin the symbol "i" was both a vowel and a consonant and in Post-Classical Latin the symbols "i" and "j" often as substitutes for each other and it would be extremely unusual for a priest to substitute "y" for the consonant "j/i" unless his thought process was in Polish while he was writing Latin.

I do have a theory---and it is only a theory, not Gospel---that the informant told the priest that the name of the deceased's father was Wojtek (diminutive of Wojciech) and, of course, the Latin for Wojciech is Adalbertus. Perhaps the old synapses were not working as normal or perhaps it was a "senior moment" and the priest came up with his own version of Wojtek---Voytechus. "K" is another letter which rarely appears in Latin. (In Classical Latin I can think of only two words which contain "k", Kalendae ( i.e. Kalends/Calends, the first day of a month, from which the English Calendar is derived) and Karthago/Carthage. Even though "k" was found a bit more frequently in Medieval and later Latin, the letter was still mostly used in a limited number of foreign words. The word as written, Voytechus, has a sound extremely similar to the Polish Wojtek, which in the 19th Century was often spelled Woytek with a Latin 2nd Declension Nominative ending, "us", added.

A final thought---the deceased was well into old age, although the age as listed, 93, needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Whoever acted as informant certainly only had second hand information regarding her father's name. Perhaps the diminutive Wojtek was given without considering the formal version, Wojciech.

Anyway, that is my theory. You will need to examine the reasons above and decide whether the theory holds water.

Wishing you success,

Dave
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