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Latin records translations
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Sun Dec 19, 2021 11:36 pm      Post subject: Re: Russian translation
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davidfrancja wrote:
Dear Marcel
thank you for your last translation.
Here is Jozef Wysocki's death certificate. the writing is bad. I don't see his parents, his ages and if he was a widower. would you know how to look at that? thanks.



Hi David,

I’m sure that you didn’t intend to post the death record of Józef Wysocki here. It would be good if you posted it in the Russian Records Translations thread.

Thanks,

Dave Nowicki
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Sun Dec 26, 2021 2:32 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin Marriage Record
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Trish wrote:
Hi,
I saw that your record was from Mogilno. My Latian isn't the greatest, but this is basically what the document is stating.

The marriage took place on February 11, 1861.
The Priest was Ladislaus Stresjakowski (not sure of correct surname spelling)
Groom - Valentius Jakuboski, a young man, from Wszedzien,
Bride - Francisca Gierszewska, a virgin, from ?. (I cannot make out the name of the town. I thought it was Dabrowka

The next section was crossed out, but on top of the crossed out wording stated "both together".

Age of Groom - 30 years
Age of Bride - 35 years

Both Catholics

The next section was also crossed out. However, there were words under the crossed out writing. The word "nullo" means no. The title of this section was parents consent. I cannot make out the words after "Nullo".

The last section are the names of the witnesses.

I hope this helps some.
Trish

herb43 wrote:
Please Translate completely:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSMZ-B7W3-S?i=288&cat=736853
Marriage record #8, Valentinus Jakuboski and Francisca Gierszewska

Thank you,
herb43


Hi Trish,

This marriage record had been posted in several places on the forum and was translated on the Latin Translations thread soon after it had been posted. You got the gist of the record but there are several tweaks needed. The surname of the priest was Stryjakowski. Although translating juvenis as “a young man” and virgo as “a virgin” are technically correct, in marriage records they have the specific meaning of “single (young) man” i.e. a bachelor. If an 80 year old bachelor married the marriage register could describe him as a “juvenis”. The word virgo is best translated as a maiden, i.e. a lady who had not been previously married without any suggestion of technical virginity. Franciszka was from Dębno (as were the two witnesses in the last columns).

Ambo liberi means “Both free (of parental authority)” Liberi is the term used for sons & daughters who had been emancipated from parental authority.
The groom was 32.

The word after “Nullo” is indigebant which is the Third Person Plural Imperfect Indicative Active of the verb indigo, indigere, indigui, (no supine), to require, to be in need of. Although the verb form regularly found in parish records is the Perfect Indicative aka the historical past, Latin had three past tenses, Imperfect, Perfect, and Pluperfect. The Imperfect was used for continuing action in past time as opposed to the Perfect which was used for completed action in past time. The Imperfect can be translated as “was requiring” or “used to require” or simply as “required”. Nullo indigebant in reference to parental or judicial consent means “they required none”.

The most likely reason for the crossed out data is that this record is a civil copy—one of several copies made—and errors easily occur when making handwritten copies of documents.

I hope these tweaks may prove useful to you in the future.

Happy New Year!

Dave
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Sun Dec 26, 2021 2:38 pm      Post subject: Re: Latin Record Translation
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Kmichael8 wrote:
Hello Dave,

I would appreciate your help with the death record for Casparus Dorn from Didershausen. He died in 1744, 19 years old and married for 9 months. Please find here the link to his record:

https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/deutschland/fulda/dietershausen-st-bartholomaeus/1-02/?pg=86

It is the first entry on the left side.

Best
Michael


Hi Michael,

I hope that you had an enjoyable Christmas.

Despite my best efforts I was not able to put a name to the disease from which he died. Your own suggestion is a possibility. Sophia also provided an interesting suggestion. My wife who is the HR director at a psych hospital and was the administrator on call this past week had to do the rounds of the nurses stations and the units each day. She checked with the doctors and nurses and was unable to win the name that disease contest. In my view, these possibilities do not explain the symptom of “raising his voice like a beast of burden”.

I read the death and burial registers for the years 1743, 1744 and 1745 and learned the following: in Didershausen between March 30th & May 12th five individuals died from the disease. They were George on March 30 at age 42; Casparus on April 15 at age 19; Anna on April 23rd at age 65; Joannes Simon on May 2 at age 60; and Eva Anna on May 12 at age 42. The only persons to die of the disease were from Didershausen. The other villages of the parish were free of the disease. This info is interesting but does not lead me to any satisfying conclusion.

The person who can get a handle on the disease should deserve a trophy with an image of a lifelike beast of burden and I’ll leave it to you or to anyone else to figure out what sort of disease it was. It has been an interesting record.

By way of explanation...the entire entry is one long sentence. In English it would be considered a run-on sentence. It brings to mind the days in English class spent diagramming sentences and that sentence would certain be a challenge to diagram. I tried to keep the translation as close to the original as possible but felt that it was better to break up the one long Latin sentence into several shorter English sentences.

The translation follows.

Happy New Year!

Dave

Col. 1: Place: From Didershausen

Col. 2 & Body of Entry: Month and Names of the Deceased: 15 April: Casper (Casparus) Dorn, married for nine months. I do not know whether he was the heir or the current legitimate owner of the parochial village of (I can’t read the name of the parish village). He was infected and brought low unto death by his sister with her entire family/household of up to the seven or eight persons who had been in this household* and infected by this spreading** disease of the head and certain of these persons thereupon already died. However, the above named (Casparus Dorn), after a time regaining his health, (was) returning from plowing in the fields (and was) coming home crying out like a beast of burden***. He was immediately visited by the pastor and refreshed by the Sacraments of Penance**** and the Eucharist**** until when on the (illegible word) 15th day of April after the middle of the night at about the first hour***** he was fortified a second time with the Sacrament of Extreme Unction**** by the assistant pastor and being (thus) disposed, breathed his last at about the second hour of the morning****** at the age of 19 years. May he rest in holy peace. Amen.

Notes: *aedes/house/building: The more free translation of household seems to be a better fit.
**grassante morbo capitali/spreading disease of the head: i.e. contagious disease of the head
***jumentum/iumentum/beast of burden: an animal used for carrying or drawing. Common beasts of burden on 18th Century farms were oxen and mules. He could have been bellowing like an ox or braying like a mule—rather strange in either case.
****Penance, Eucharist/Viaticum, and Extreme Unction: collectively known as The Last Rites.
*****hora prima/the first hour: 1a.m.
******hora secunda matutina/the second hour of the morning: 2a.m.
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TedMack



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Post Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2021 12:39 am      Post subject: Latin Record Translation
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G'day Dave

Can you please translate the attached death records of twins from the Rychnow parish obtained from FamilySearch Lookup service. They are records 4 & 5 - full page and cropped shot.

Thanks
Ted



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Kmichael8



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Post Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2021 5:52 am      Post subject: Re: Latin Record Translation
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Hi Dave,

The challenge to find out what happened provides an impression of the helplessness they must have felt in Didershausen nearly three centuries ago. Something strange and deadly happening time and again.

Thank you for this thorough translation and your explanations.

Happy New Year!
Michael
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Trish



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Post Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2021 7:33 am      Post subject: Re: Latin Marriage Record
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dnowicki wrote:
Trish wrote:
Hi,
I saw that your record was from Mogilno. My Latian isn't the greatest, but this is basically what the document is stating.

The marriage took place on February 11, 1861.
The Priest was Ladislaus Stresjakowski (not sure of correct surname spelling)
Groom - Valentius Jakuboski, a young man, from Wszedzien,
Bride - Francisca Gierszewska, a virgin, from ?. (I cannot make out the name of the town. I thought it was Dabrowka

The next section was crossed out, but on top of the crossed out wording stated "both together".

Age of Groom - 30 years
Age of Bride - 35 years

Both Catholics

The next section was also crossed out. However, there were words under the crossed out writing. The word "nullo" means no. The title of this section was parents consent. I cannot make out the words after "Nullo".

The last section are the names of the witnesses.

I hope this helps some.
Trish

herb43 wrote:
Please Translate completely:
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSMZ-B7W3-S?i=288&cat=736853
Marriage record #8, Valentinus Jakuboski and Francisca Gierszewska

Thank you,
herb43


Hi Trish,

This marriage record had been posted in several places on the forum and was translated on the Latin Translations thread soon after it had been posted. You got the gist of the record but there are several tweaks needed. The surname of the priest was Stryjakowski. Although translating juvenis as “a young man” and virgo as “a virgin” are technically correct, in marriage records they have the specific meaning of “single (young) man” i.e. a bachelor. If an 80 year old bachelor married the marriage register could describe him as a “juvenis”. The word virgo is best translated as a maiden, i.e. a lady who had not been previously married without any suggestion of technical virginity. Franciszka was from Dębno (as were the two witnesses in the last columns).

Ambo liberi means “Both free (of parental authority)” Liberi is the term used for sons & daughters who had been emancipated from parental authority.
The groom was 32.

The word after “Nullo” is indigebant which is the Third Person Plural Imperfect Indicative Active of the verb indigo, indigere, indigui, (no supine), to require, to be in need of. Although the verb form regularly found in parish records is the Perfect Indicative aka the historical past, Latin had three past tenses, Imperfect, Perfect, and Pluperfect. The Imperfect was used for continuing action in past time as opposed to the Perfect which was used for completed action in past time. The Imperfect can be translated as “was requiring” or “used to require” or simply as “required”. Nullo indigebant in reference to parental or judicial consent means “they required none”.

The most likely reason for the crossed out data is that this record is a civil copy—one of several copies made—and errors easily occur when making handwritten copies of documents.

I hope these tweaks may prove useful to you in the future.

Happy New Year!

Dave


Hi Dave,
Thank you for taking the time to explain things to me. I do appreciate it.
Have a wonderful day!
Trish
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dnowicki
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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2021 12:43 am      Post subject: Re: Latin Record Translation
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TedMack wrote:
G'day Dave

Can you please translate the attached death records of twins from the Rychnow parish obtained from FamilySearch Lookup service. They are records 4 & 5 - full page and cropped shot.

Thanks
Ted


Hi Ted,

Some of the vocabulary the priest used to express some details in the entry are not exactly main stream conventional choices and there are better ways to convey what he was saying but the records are basically straightforward. The translation follows.

Happy New Year!

Dave

Top of Page: The Year 1823
Left Margin: Twins
Body of Entries: Rychnów: In the Year of Our Lord 1823 on the 16th day of the month of February I, Franciszek Szunawski (?), the curate of Rychnów, buried a boy child by the name of Maciej (born) of the legitimate marital bed of the industrious* Jan and Anna Kruszak at the age of slight/thin** of a year, who was buried in the field*** cemetery towards the south.
Rychnów: In the Year of Our Lord 1823 on the 17th day of the month of February I, who (is named) above, buried a boy child by the name of Grzegorz, a son (born) of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Jan and Anna Kruszak who was buried in the field*** cemetery towards the south.

Notes: *laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to designate an individual as a peasant.
**tenuis/thin/slight: The adjective is intended to convey the idea that the twins were not quite one year old.
***campistralis/of the field: It is difficult to determine what exactly the choice of adjective was meant to convey but it is the designation used to describe the cemetery in every entry on the two pages. The Polish version would be polowy. Campistralis, however, can also have the meaning of “military”, a less likely meaning here. Perhaps the priest is simply stating that the cemetery is rural.
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TedMack



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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2021 1:23 am      Post subject: Re: Latin Record Translation
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dnowicki wrote:
TedMack wrote:
G'day Dave

Can you please translate the attached death records of twins from the Rychnow parish obtained from FamilySearch Lookup service. They are records 4 & 5 - full page and cropped shot.

Thanks
Ted


Hi Ted,

Some of the vocabulary the priest used to express some details in the entry are not exactly main stream conventional choices and there are better ways to convey what he was saying but the records are basically straightforward. The translation follows.

Happy New Year!

Dave

Top of Page: The Year 1823
Left Margin: Twins
Body of Entries: Rychnów: In the Year of Our Lord 1823 on the 16th day of the month of February I, Franciszek Szunawski (?), the curate of Rychnów, buried a boy child by the name of Maciej (born) of the legitimate marital bed of the industrious* Jan and Anna Kruszak at the age of slight/thin** of a year, who was buried in the field*** cemetery towards the south.
Rychnów: In the Year of Our Lord 1823 on the 17th day of the month of February I, who (is named) above, buried a boy child by the name of Grzegorz, a son (born) of the legitimate marital union of the industrious* Jan and Anna Kruszak who was buried in the field*** cemetery towards the south.

Notes: *laboriosus/industrious: an adjective used to designate an individual as a peasant.
**tenuis/thin/slight: The adjective is intended to convey the idea that the twins were not quite one year old.
***campistralis/of the field: It is difficult to determine what exactly the choice of adjective was meant to convey but it is the designation used to describe the cemetery in every entry on the two pages. The Polish version would be polowy. Campistralis, however, can also have the meaning of “military”, a less likely meaning here. Perhaps the priest is simply stating that the cemetery is rural.


Thanks Dave

Very informative as always. I thought the twins were older, I'll have to go back over my notes to see why I thought that. Hopefully, Family Search library will re-open in the new year and I can search these records.

Happy New Year.

Ted
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MPolanski



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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2021 11:16 am      Post subject: died in childbirth
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Hi Dave,

Could you please clarify entry 31? Parents are Sebastianus Polanski and Apolina Juliaszowna. Am I correct that one male child died in childbirth without a midwife present? Google also lead me to think a male child was baptized. If so by whom? I found it interesting, albeit additionally sad, that under these conditions the entry is so sparse. The priest didn't enter the parents' parents. Also if the child was baptized, was a baptismal date not entered because the child wasn't baptized by a priest?

Thanks for this and also your latest occupation, vocabulary and name lists,

Malu



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Post Posted: Thu Dec 30, 2021 10:45 pm      Post subject: Re: died in childbirth
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MPolanski wrote:
Hi Dave,

Could you please clarify entry 31? Parents are Sebastianus Polanski and Apolina Juliaszowna. Am I correct that one male child died in childbirth without a midwife present? Google also lead me to think a male child was baptized. If so by whom? I found it interesting, albeit additionally sad, that under these conditions the entry is so sparse. The priest didn't enter the parents' parents. Also if the child was baptized, was a baptismal date not entered because the child wasn't baptized by a priest?

Thanks for this and also your latest occupation, vocabulary and name lists,

Malu


Hi Malu,

You are half correct about the child. Yes, a male child died during childbirth but although the record does not state the name of the midwife, it is most likely or almost certain that a midwife was present and that she was the person who baptized the child. The reason that no baptismal date was entered was due to the fact that the birth, the baptism, and the death were pretty much simultaneous. Everything happened on December 14, 1839 and thus there was no need to enter separate dates for birth, baptism, and death. The entry probably had few details entered because of who the person was who provided the information. Most likely that person was the midwife. She may not have been aware of the names of the child’s maternal and paternal grandparents. The baptism took place under stressful conditions. The child was being born and dying in the process of being born. When the midwife realized that the child was in peril she did what she had been taught to do—said the words “I baptize you in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit” while pouring water on the child’s head. There was no time to even give the child a name.

The two operative parts of the entry are: “prolis (which should be proles) masculina ex aqua baptisata” and “in partu mortua” The noun should have been entered as “proles” (the Nominative Singular) rather than “prolis” (the Genitive Singular). Now let us look at these phrases in terms of grammar in order to understand their meaning and grammatical structure (which is probably way more than you wanted to know but explains why the adjectives and participles, which are verbal adjectives, have feminine endings although the child was male). It is important to keep in mind that Latin nouns all have gender which is sometimes determined by sex, but most often is grammatical. Latin dictionaries contain three important pieces in information before they list the English meaning or meanings of the Latin noun. The first piece of info is the noun in its Nominative Singular, which is followed by the Genitive Singular and then the gender of the noun. The Genitive Singular tells us the declension to which the noun belongs and is the source of the stem of the noun to which the various case endings are attached. The gender is important to know since so often it is grammatical rather than sexual. In our phrases the noun is proles, prolis, feminine and means offspring/child. Since proles is feminine in gender the adjectives which modify it will need to use the feminine endings even though the offspring to which they refer is a male. The offspring in this case is modified by the feminine form of the adjective masculina and the Perfect Passive Participle baptisata. So the English meaning is “a masculine offspring, baptized with water”. The words with water (ex aqua) tell us that the baptism was done in a state of emergency and only included the most essential portion of the rite. The surrounding ceremonies were omitted and had the child lived would have been done at a later time. The phrase “in partu mortua” completes the story and is translated as “dead in childbirth”. Again mortua has the feminine ending because it is modifying the first word, proles.

Nouns regularly encountered in birth/baptism, marriage, and death/burial records usually belong to one of the first three declensions but partus, partus, masculine belongs to the Fourth Declension and hence the Ablative Singular form partu. The child was probably not stillborn since the usual phrasing for a stillbirth would be “natus inanimatus” (born without life) or mortus natus (born dead). What we can conclude is that the child was alive as the birthing began but was in severe distress, was baptized and died before the birthing was complete.

You are most welcome for the lists. Attached is a PDF document which shows the case endings and uses for Latin nouns.

Happy New Year!

Dave



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MPolanski



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Post Posted: Fri Dec 31, 2021 1:06 pm      Post subject: Re: died in childbirth
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Hi Dave,

Thanks for the explanation I knew you’d be able to add some clarification. This lack of midwife and the fact that this mother is the Apolonia Polanski that I think (without hard facts) may be a midwife, lead me to go back and do a very small survey of some of my scans. In scans pre approximately 1834 the listing of the midwife is scarce and pre 1829 I didn’t find it at all. “ My” Apolonia shows up around 1860, when she would have been in her 50s, the age of a typical midwife according to https://doroshheritagetours.com/obstetrix/ (a webpage but at least one with references).

Your understanding of the vocabulary used during births helped to pinpoint more accurately what the situation likely was.

On languages I’m not a neophyte but also not an expert. I tend to learn them more through imitation than grammatical dissection. Therefore, I in theory understand the rules, but don't use them so much in practice. I’m much more at home in Germanic languages (German, Swedish) than Romance languages (Italian and French). That being said my ability to recognize the meanings behind case endings in, to me, foreign languages is - well - non existent. Add that at first I thought psolis might be opsolis and off I went down a non-existent track. In true fashion for this family’s scans, the sex was first marked as a female and then changed to male. "What twins?” she exclaimed! Being such a pro at making up stories I should write fiction.

Thanks for the list. I think I already have it but I’ll download and make sure this isn’t a newer version. On my computer I have a file under Polish genealogy titled Dave’s lists. A few other lists have made their way into that folder but mostly they are yours and referred to regularly.

Best regards and Happy New Year!

Malu
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Kurt1322



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Post Posted: Sun Jan 02, 2022 11:07 am      Post subject: One Word Help
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This may me a very simple word but I can't seem to get a concrete definition. I would so much appreciate the translation.

Thank you,

Kurt



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Post Posted: Sun Jan 02, 2022 10:08 pm      Post subject: Latin-Polish and Latin-English Occupations
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Salvete Omnes,

Since a member of the PO Forum requested the Latin-Polish list of occupations I’m posting it here. Also, I’m posting an updated version of the Latin-English list.

Valete,

Dave



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Post Posted: Sun Jan 02, 2022 10:10 pm      Post subject: Re: One Word Help
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Kurt1322 wrote:
This may me a very simple word but I can't seem to get a concrete definition. I would so much appreciate the translation.

Thank you,

Kurt


Hi Kurt,

The word inquilinus dates back to Classical Latin and has been used with the same meaning for more than 2,000 years. The root meaning of the word is “one who dwells in a place which is not his own.” The word was used in vital records in Poland with that same meaning. Choices for translating inquilinus would be “border” or “tenant” or “lodger”. The Polish is “komornik”. In records the word was used to describe the social/economic status of a peasant who did not have his own cottage but lived with and worked for another. He paid for his bed and board by working for the person with whom he (and his family) lived.

I hope that this explanation helps.

Happy New Year!

Dave
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davidckane



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Post Posted: Thu Jan 06, 2022 8:53 am      Post subject:
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Hi. If someone could please translate row 22 for Joseph Niebojewski and Victoria, I would be very grateful. Thanks!


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