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Polish Sounds for Friday
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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 9:52 am      Post subject: Polish Sounds for Friday
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Today we are starting a new topic: "Polish sounds for Friday".
Each week we will be posting something new for you to listen.

I hope that you will enjoy this small series. Of course if you would like to join the game and share your musical findings here: feel invited!

Polish sound for today is quite controversial. The unusual combination of electro music and well known icon of Polish music: Mazowsze.

This is Mazowsze that will surprise you!
Watch and listen their performance during the largest Polish rock festiwal: Woodstock Festival Poland



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Cheri Vanden Berg
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Post Posted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:54 am      Post subject:
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Aga,
Thank you for sharing this. Is the wooden instrument that was played in the beginning a traditional instrument?
Cheri
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sirdan
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Post Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 2:53 am      Post subject:
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After some search, i found this wooden stick might be traditional instrument called Fujara Postna http://hosting3721980.az.pl/jar/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=22:fujara-postna&catid=2:instrumanty&Itemid=3 and more instruments here http://www.interklasa.pl/portal/dokumenty/r091/instrumenty.htm

Nice song btw, i like concept of mixing traditional sounds with new electronic musing and brakes Smile
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Cheri Vanden Berg
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Post Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 10:54 am      Post subject:
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Thank you very much Sirdan. I tried searching for it too, but didn't find the Fujara Postna. That must be correct since shepherds invented it. Very interesting. I enjoyed this version of the Mazowsze too. I was surprised to read that it was controversial. I saw the traditional version performed by the Lira Ensemble of Chicago. I loved that as well. If they used the Fujara Postna, I don't remember it. Thanks again!
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Elzbieta Porteneuve
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Post Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 6:18 pm      Post subject:
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Aga, I had only time today to see and listen "This () Mazowsze that will suprise you! "

I like it!

Much much more than the classic one, I saw last November in Warsaw in Teatr Wielki / Opera.

This one is live, the Warsaw's one was - disappointing, I felt like assisting to the end of an old story, quite sad.

Thank you!
Elzbieta
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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:44 am      Post subject:
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Thank you very much for your comments! I am happy that you liked this video (or at least considered it interesting) Smile

As sirdan wrote, this instrument is fujara postna and its name is coming from Polish word post (lent), because this used to be the only instrument that could be played during Lent.

I have found the other video with fujara postna:


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 04, 2014 9:38 am      Post subject:
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Today I would like to present you something more traditional: Janusz Prusinowski Trio.

"Janusz Prusinowski Trio is a group of musicians who follow in traditions of village masters they have learned from: Jan Lewandowski, Kazimierz Meto, Józef Zaraś, Piotr and Jan Gaca, Tadeusz Kubiak and many others – but they are also an avant-garde band with their own characteristic sound and language of improvisation. They combine music with dance and the archaic with the modern.(...)

Between 2008 and 2012 the band performed in most of European countries, Asia, Canada, the USA (including Carnegie Hall and Chicago Symphony Center) – and of course Poland. Besides playing concerts with traditional Polish music the band prepared a special programme of performances “The village roots of Frédéric Chopin’s music” with pianist Janusz Olejniczak.

In 2012 Trio begun a unique project "Kujawy” with three masters of Polish music: Tadeusz Kubiak, Tomasz Stańko, Janusz Olejniczak, and a group of singers led by Ewa Grochowska.

The group also performed with Michał Urbaniak, Artur Dutkiewicz and Alim Qasimov. Apart of concerts, Trio’s music can be heard at the parties of village and urban Dance Clubs or theatrical performances at the Polish National Theatre and the Polish Radio Theatre.

They also run musical and dance workshops. In 2008 the band released “Mazurkas”, an album which received rave reviews. This was followed in 2010 by their second album “Heart”."


From: http://www.januszprusinowskitrio.pl/en/the-band.php


Listen to their song "Serce" ("Heart"):


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 9:28 am      Post subject:
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Today I would like to present you the contemporary Polish band, combining Ukrainian folk, rock and ska music: Enej.
A joyful song, good for spring and weekend. The title is: "Tak smakuje życie" ("How life tastes")


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(music starts from 47 second)
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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2014 7:03 am      Post subject:
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As today is Good Friday (Wielki Piątek) commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary, for this solemn day I have found the traditional Polish Lent song: "Odszedł Pasterz od nas":


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 10:01 am      Post subject:
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Today's Polish sound for Friday is Rokiczanka "W moim ogródecku" ("In my garden").

This was already posted in the other thread in our Forum, but this is definitely worth reminding. Not only because of the the music, but also the video made in The Ethnographic Museum in Lublin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hp4endJMu1E&feature=share&list=PLoyg2K8-KjbV0lc7xLZ0YcSq5Z30H3-PR&index=1


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri May 09, 2014 9:38 am      Post subject:
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"ojDADAna" is the album recorded by Grzegorz Ciechowski, released in 1996, reissued in 2002.

The album is a kind of experiment combination of modern rhythms, electric guitars with Polish traditional songs performed by authentic folk singers. The album caused some controversy, especially among some singers appearing on the album as well as ethnographers.

There was also a series of the videoclips made by famous Polish director: Jan Jakub Kolski.
Each one is a separate, little story referring to the traditional culture and vanising world of the life in the Polish villages.

Listen and watch song and wideo: "A gdzież moje kare konie" ("Oh, where are my black horses")


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri May 16, 2014 8:44 am      Post subject:
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Today would have been 112 birthday of Jan Kiepura who was an acclaimed Polish tenor singer and actor.

"He was born on 16 May 1902 in Sosnowiec (Silesia). In 1926, Jan Kiepura left Poland for an international career in Germany, Hungary, France, and England. When he returned to Poland, with the money he had earned from his performances, he built the well-known hotel Patria in the Polish border town of Krynica-Zdrój, which cost him about US$3 million.

Kiepura's return to Warsaw in 1934 caused a sensation in the Polish capital, and his musical shows were received with huge enthusiasm. Apart from his performances in concert halls, he also sang to a crowd gathered under the balcony of the Warsaw hotel "Bristol". He also sang while standing on his car's roof, or from a carriage's window, and also spoke to the audience. However, he was not a frequent guest in Poland. He signed contracts with Convert Garden in London, Opéra Comique in Paris and National Opera in Berlin. Kiepura also started a film career, working with Berlin's UFA and then with the Motion Picture Industry in Hollywood. He died at the age of 64 in New York and was buried in Powązki Cemetery, Warsaw" (from Wikipedia)

So Polish sound for today is "Brunetki, blondynki" (one of Kiepura's most famous songs. He is singing about the women, that he loves all of them: brunettes, blondes...)


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri May 23, 2014 10:30 am      Post subject:
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This week I have already mentioned Wojtek: the bear adopted by soldiers of the 22nd Artillery Supply Company of the Polish II Corps.
(here is separate topic about Wojtek on our Forum: http://polishorigins.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1560)

I found also a nice song about Wojtek by Katy Carr (a Polish-British singer) and I decided that this will be good for today's Polish sound:


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Agnieszka Pawlus
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Post Posted: Fri May 30, 2014 8:28 am      Post subject:
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Have you ever heard about combination of Jamaica reggae and Polish Tatra mountains folklore music?
Listen to good, old records of Trebunie Tutki from Tatra Mountains and Twinkle Brothers Rastamen from Jamaica:



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Zenon
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Post Posted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 12:24 am      Post subject:
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Last week we prepared for you the Jamaica reggae and Polish Tatra mountains folklore music combination.

What about mixing folklore with some wind instruments? Listen to Golec uOrkiestra.



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