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lauren



Joined: 01 Nov 2014
Replies: 1

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Post Posted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 8:52 pm      Post subject:
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Does anybody know anything about the surnames Grzybek and Pacholak.
I cannot trace them past my great grandparents (Apolonia Grzybek and Szeslaw Pacholak).

And I am not sure how or where I should start looking since the last time I tried researching surnames (Huzanic and Svitlik) I found nothing at all. Sad
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Aga Pawlus
PolishOrigins Team


Joined: 10 Mar 2013
Replies: 633
Location: Poland

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Post Posted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:41 am      Post subject:
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Lauren,

Grzybek is from Polish grzyb- „fungus” or "muschroom" .

In 2002 there were 5982 individuals using the surname Grzybek living in Poland. Detailed map of the surname distribution can be found here: http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/grzybek.html

Listen how this surname is pronounced in Polish (click on the “Listen” button): https://translate.google.com/#pl/en/Grzybek .

Click here http://polishorigins.com/databases/index?s=Grzybek to check what can be found about your surname in the PolishOrigins Databases tool.

And here in PolishOrigins Surnames Databaseyou will find other PolishOrigins members interested in Grzybek surname: http://polishorigins.com/surnames/search/string/Grzybek .

Pacholak is from Polish pachoł, “boy, lad; servant, usher”.

In 2002 there were 883 individuals using the surname Pacholak living in Poland. Detailed map of the surname distribution can be found here: http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/pacholak.html.

Listen how this surname is pronounced in Polish (click on the “Listen” button): https://translate.google.com/#pl/en/Pacholak .

Click here http://polishorigins.com/databases/index?s=Pacholak to check what can be found about your surname in the PolishOrigins Databases tool.


Sources
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CharlesFink



Joined: 06 Jul 2018
Replies: 3
Location: New York, NY

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Post Posted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 8:39 pm      Post subject:
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My ancestry contains the surname Grzybek as well (I think). My great great grandfather (my mother's mother's father's father) was Pincus Finkenthal, born 1859. He was obviously Jewish. He took a wife named Martha probably 1880-1890. They lived in Warsaw until they left for New York in 1900 or 1901 after the Third Partition.

Most of Martha's records show her married name Finkenthal, so I'm having trouble determining her maiden name. A family tree here https://www.geni.com/family-tree/canvas/6000000002390777771 says Gryybek, but I'm wondering if this is a misspelling?

I attached the one record I found. 2/3rds down, at the end of the line that begins "Her local address is...", it says either Grrybek or Grzybek. It's hard to read the cursive.

Basically I'm asking, do the names Gryybek or Grrybek exist, or is it pretty certain that her maiden name was Grzybek? I'm quite sure she was Jewish too, her parents' first names Joseph and Sara Leah sound Jewish, but Jews were well integrated into society at the time so perhaps she nonetheless had an authentic "Polish" surname? Was this common? Or did all Jews have typical "Jewish" names?

Is there another way I can research their history and marriage, perhaps on a Polish site?

Thank you so much for any help you can offer! I visited Poland last summer and LOVED it, and I'm trying to learn more about that branch of my family.

Sincerely,
Christopher / Krzysztof



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Sophia



Joined: 05 Oct 2014
Replies: 308

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Post Posted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 3:32 pm      Post subject:
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Hi Christopher,
In the document that you attached, the name is definitely Grzybek. It's actually rather nice handwriting! If you want me to type out the rest of what is written on that address line, let me know, but I am guessing that is not an important part of your search.
The other two spellings that you ask about, Grrybek and Gryybek, are improbable in Polish.
Best,
Sophia
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CharlesFink



Joined: 06 Jul 2018
Replies: 3
Location: New York, NY

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Post Posted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 4:20 pm      Post subject:
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Sophia,

Thank you so much! That is marvelously helpful. If you could type out the rest of the address line, that actually would be great too.

Dziękuje bardzo,
Christopher
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Sophia



Joined: 05 Oct 2014
Replies: 308

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Post Posted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 4:41 pm      Post subject:
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No problem!
"Her local address is Warsaw, Dluga 23, m. 39, or Marjanska No. 6, c/o Grzybek"
So that means, in the city of Warsaw, on a street by the name of Dluga, building number 23, apartment number 39. Alternatively, she would be found in the city of Warsaw, on a street by the name of Marjanska (today's spelling is Marianska), building number 6, and (I think you already understand this part) "c/o Grzybek" means "care of Grzybek."
May I suggest you go to this website http://www.mapofpoland.net/Warszawa,map.html and scroll down to where they have listed the streets of Warsaw alphabetically. Click on the street name of interest to see it on a map.
Enjoy!
Sophia
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CharlesFink



Joined: 06 Jul 2018
Replies: 3
Location: New York, NY

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Post Posted: Sun Jul 08, 2018 6:13 pm      Post subject:
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Thanks again Sophia,

That solves a great puzzle for me, I could find Dluga but I couldn't tell whether it said "Marjanska" or "Marjawksa" and I couldn't find either on a map. But now that I know its modern spelling is Marianska I found it, and it's right around where I was biking last August!

My best,
Christopher
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Sophia



Joined: 05 Oct 2014
Replies: 308

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Post Posted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:47 am      Post subject:
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Isn't it an amazing feeling to be in the place where your ancestors once lived?
I just want to mention that languages are, indeed, flexible and therefore spellings that once were in use later become archaic. The Marjanska=Marianska is one example, but did you know the same thing happened with "thal"? In German, the word for "valley" used to be spelled "thal" but now it is "tal". As a Finkenthal descendant, you might find that interesting.
Best of luck in your searches,
Sophia
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