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Shellie
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Post Posted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 10:06 pm      Post subject:
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Even though I've learned so much about my family through Greek Catholic church records from the state archives in Poland, I would like to see if I can learn more from Tad's 10 point offer: http://forum.polishorigins.com/viewtopic.php?t=2045&start=15

Tad, I know that my family came from Rebizanty, near Huta Rozaniecka and I was able to visit my village in 2011. Thanks to the Greek Catholic records that a researcher obtained for me, I went back to my 4x Great-Grandparents Theodor Rebizant and Mary Mazylak. I have been unable to find records records after about 1860 or before 1785 - but I am so THANKFUL that I've found this much! I have a few mysteries I would like to solve and maybe Tad, your 10 points might help me. Here are my 2 big mysteries:

My 4X great-grandmother was Mary Mazylak. I have not found this surname in any records from Huta Rozaniecka, Ruda Rozaniecka, Podlesina, Narol and a few other nearby villages. I have no clue about where she was born except that I found a village nearby named Mazily. I have not found any records for this village however.

My second mystery is very interesting. From studying hundreds of Greek Catholic church records from Huta Rozaniecka (Rebizanty was part of this village) - I discovered that my family surname was Lewkowicz. I came across dozens of records that show my ancestors with this surname Lewkowicz and then with the surname Rebizant. Sometimes a birth record will show my 4x great-grandfather as Theodor Lewkowicz and wife Mary Mazylak and then a year later another child will show them as Theodor Rebizant and Mary Mazylak. I found it with other ancestors also, so I'm sure that this is not a mistake. I have learned that Lewkowicz is a rather common Ukrainian surname, though many of may family ask if I've just found evidence that we are Jewish. Tad, I would love to see what your 10 points might tell me about my Lewkowicz ancestors and where they may have been before Huta Rozaniecka / Rebizanty.

Best Regards from Atlanta!
Shellie



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Last edited by Shellie on Sun Nov 10, 2013 8:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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TadWysocki



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Post Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 6:32 am      Post subject:
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Shellie,

You deserve the best our help and assistance from Poland, I see your many years efforts to uncover and preserve your family roots from this part of United Europe, all our ancestors deserve the best our memory and homage, I will do my best to help you in discovering your ancestors Lewkowicz - Rebizant, and Mazylak from Poland.

With the first view I see their religion was historically very rich Greek Catholics from East Poland, their homes Huta Rozaniecka and Rebizanty from the end of the 18th century, after beginning of the 3 political partitions, were located just on the border of the Austria-Hungary Empire, and Russia Empire, our duty would be to imagine their every-day life from that time, and from the beg of the 20th century when the part of the family decided to collect the huge money, and to buy the railway tickets to any European port, together with ship travel place, going 3000 miles over unknown ocean to the new land America, I see from your notes three brave and young sisters immigrated to the U.S., Mary in 1911, Anna in 1912, and Alice in ...., wonderful story.

Now, to tell something about the family life in Poland it would be wonderful to see the full GC records uncovered by you, I'm not sure what scope of information would be possible to see from them, if the full records were given in the "Austrian style", thus the names and dates are included, but if the records were given in the "Russian style", so, we can see the record like a story, giving on a half-page many sentences about the family names, dates, origins, occupations, witnesses, godparents, etc., sometimes they are additional notes given by civil/parish registrar about the additional names, marriages, deaths, adoptions, etc.

Without these records, it would be very difficult to tell the family story, so, I will try to cross some databases to tell you ANY SUPPOSITIONS:
1. I will check all family names with the Polish etymological works, including Prof. K. Rymut "Nazwiska Polakow Slownik Historyczno-Etymologiczny" - The Family Names in Poland ...., Prof. Zofia Kaleta "The Surname as a Cultural Value and an Ethnic Heritage", Instytut PAN, 1997.
2. The next step would be to compare some information going from a/m point with some Polish genealogical databases like Geneteka (indexes from the 18th and 19th century), Metryki, KZM (Katalog Zasobow Metrykalnych), Pradziad, Zosia, Szukaj..., etc.
3. Step three would be to check all family places with Polish historical sources from the 19th century, as Slownik Geograficzny - The Geographical Directory, 1890-1902, other works, finally with Prof. Rymut "Nazwy Miescowe Polski Historia Pochodzenie Zmiany - The Names of the Local Places in Poland The History Origin Changes" , trying to have the place and life description.
4. The next step would be to check the surname location in the present-day Poland, telling if any of these surnames/Polish versions survived in the area.
5. Finally, I will try to tell something about their life, customs, holy places, and tell what would be their homes in the 18th century, and maybe earlier.

Wish me luck, I see your family names are very rare, and untipical in Poland, I'm also very curious what would be possible to tell, basing only on a/m 5 points. Please forgive me if my search results will be tiny.

Happy weekend in the U.S.!

From your family old country Poland, now with cold and rainy days, slowly Winter is coming, but we like every season in Poland Smile

Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw, Poland
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Shellie
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Post Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:06 am      Post subject:
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Hi Tad,
Thank you for responding to this non-typical request. Although I have already discovered much information on my own, I realize that it might be very helpful to go back to basics and see what can be discovered now that I have a new surname to explore.

Yes, I have come to realize over the years that Rebizant is indeed a rare name. In fact, I think that every Rebizant I have ever met can trace their ancestors back to Huta Rozaniecka. I have come to suspect that Rebizant was originally a nickname and I will be very excited to hear what else we can find. One of my genealogy friends sent me an article a few years ago that theorized the name came from a form of the word Rebel, or Rebiz.... something related to smuggling. I will find the article and share it with you. Some of my Rebizant cousins feel that this theory is wrong, however. But there was certainly some smuggling going on in Rebizanty in the old days. The most famous "treasure" smuggled across the Russian border into our village was Pilsudski himself in 1901, aided by Rebizants and foresters.

I have a burning desire to learn what life was like for my Rebizant ancestors. I have read Slomka's excellent book: From Serfdom to Self Government, and I want to learn more. I try to read anything I can find about the borderlands and the area called Roztocze. I appreciate any sources of information!

Tad, I will be delighted to share the Greek Catholic images with you. Most are in Latin, but some are in Ukrainian. They were obtained in the archives in Przemyśl by an excellent researcher, Maciej Orzechowski. I would like to find more records, but I suspect they are Lviv - just my own theory.

Thanks so much Tad!!!
Shellie
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Shellie
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Post Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:05 am      Post subject:
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The following is from an article titled Z toponimii roztocza. It was found here:
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=14484566

Many people who read this article are rather skeptical about the Rebizant/Smuggler name theory. But I will leave it to the reader to decide for himself / herself. The Google translation follows. I would appreciate any corrections to the translation.

W nieopodal położonej wsi Huta-Szumy jeden z przysiółków nosi miano Rebizanty. Toponim ten należy wiązać z nazwą rodową od nazwy osobowej Rebizant, tę zaś z apelatywem rebeli- zant, rebeliant ‘przeciwny, nieposłuszny prawu’. W toponimie Rebizant <Rebelizant> sześcian, tragikokomiczny > tragokomiczny, człowiek > człek. Nazwa Rebizanty określała dawniej mieszkańców obszarów przygranicznych, trudniących się han- dlem oraz przemytnictwem. Słownik geograficzny z przełomu XIX i XX wieku informuje nas o mieszkańcach tego obszaru, jako o ubogiej, ale oświeconej i „zabiegłej” ludności, która z uwagi na kiepskie warunki życia oraz nieurodzajne gleby trudniła się m.in. przemycaniem okowity. Warto przy tej okazji wspomnieć, że omawiane wsie położone były w tym czasie na granicy dwóch zaborów: rosyjskiego oraz austriackiego. W sąsiedniej miejscowości Paary, a także w niedalekich Maziłach, istniały nawet posterunki straży granicznej. Z czasem nazwa Rebizant zmieniła swoją kategorię przechodząc z pierwotnego przezwiska odapelatywnego do kategorii nazw rodowych.

Google Translation:
In the village located near Huta- noise one of the hamlets is called Rebizanty . Toponim may be associated with the name of the ancestral Rebizant from a personal name , this and the appellative rebellion - Zant , rebel ' against , disobey the law . " The toponymy Rebizant <Rebelizant> cube tragikokomiczny > tragokomiczny man > man . Name Rebizanty determined the former residents of border areas , engaged in trade and soap and smuggling . Geographical Dictionary of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, tells us about the inhabitants of the area, as the poor, but enlightened and " barred " people who , due to poor living conditions and infertile soils were engaged in such smuggling spirits . It is worth mentioning that these villages were located at that time on the boundary of two partitions : the Russian and the Austrian . In the neighboring village of Paary , as well as in the nearby Maziły, there were even sentries guard. As time changed its name Rebizant category going from the original nickname odapelatywnego to ancestral domain names .


Last edited by Shellie on Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:19 am; edited 1 time in total
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Post Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:18 am      Post subject:
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Another article, titled Introduction to the Study of Prehistoric Ethnogenic Processes in Eastern Europe by Valentyn Stetsyuk suggests Rebizant is derived from a Kurdish word.

He wrote:
We know that the Poles were not present in the southern Baltic Poles at the beginning of our era, therefore, the Polish-Iranian relations have to look for another explanation. The made analysis showed that the assumed place names of Kurdish origin are concentrated mainly in Podolia, but they also can be found sporadically in more western areas. Because they were not numerous, they are not taken into account. However, while analyzing the place names of the south-eastern corner of Poland a small collection of names

Narol – Kurd nar “fire”, ol “a group” (the Kurd were fire-worshipers);

Paary in one kilometer from Narol (see above) – Kurd pa “a level”, ar “fire” (once again mentioning of fire);

Pordysówka near the village of Chamernia (see below) – Kurd fort “a beast”, isûl “a custom”;

Rebizanty in two kilometers from Paary – Kurd reb “a god”, zend (other Ir zand) “a hand”;

Chemernia in four kilometer from Rebizanty – Kurd xumar “morose” or xawer “sun”.

As you can see, the first four words are in one way or another connected with the customs and religion. If the name of the village Chamernia is associated with the sun, it also can be attributed to this group, because the Kurd worship not only fire but the sun too. All five villages are stretched as a chain from the south-
east to north-west trough a distance of twenty miles between two large tracts of forest. Other place names definitely decrypted by means of Kurdish are not found far around. It can not be accidental. Obviously, pagan temples were concentrated in this area, where local population came together to perform religious rites. This is assumed on the warrant of the names of numerous villages having in their name the word Majdan (Kurd meydan “area, space”), both separately and in complex names (Majdan, Maydanek, Majdan-Górny, Majdan-Welki, Majdan-Sopoci, Majdan-Niepryski) located in the immediate neighborhood at a distance till forty miles from above mentioned villages. This concentration of Kurdish place names are located quite far from the Carpathians, and there are on their other side no place-names of possible Kurdish origin, but it is
interesting that the name of the Carpathians Beskid can be decrypted by means of the Kurdish language.

You can read the entire article here: http://znanie.podelise.ru/docs/88923/index-1737.html
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TadWysocki



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Post Posted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 6:07 am      Post subject:
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Hi again dear Shellie with beatiful Autumn new week!

Thanks for your last messages, yes, I've checked some of these sources. I'm working now on the final conclusions after crossing in my analysis the etymological and historical works with your family names Rebizant, Mazylak, and Lewkowicz, together with place name Rebizanty, and other in the local area. Your Rebizant, and Mazelak are very rare, thus, this would be same disadvantage, and advantage of the search.

In my opinion, in this kind of analysis, every theory must be taken into account, thus, maybe some of the local names have Kurdish origin, however, to be open with you, Polish etymological sources are not fully confirming this theory, and seems most of the names given by Valentyn Stetsyuk in his work "Introduction to the Study of Prehistoric Ethnogenic Processes in Eastern Europe" are directly going from the Polish language [Jezyk Staropolski], giving you the example with the only first name of the place Narol:

Narol, today named as Narol, and Narol-Wies, two villages located in the south-eastern part of Poland, the name would derive from the Polish language and words Na Role - Na Roli [on the field, located on the field], noted as: In 1578 as Narol Nowa, in 1585 as Floryanow [Floryanów], in 1618-1764 as Floryanow, in 1681 - 1682 as Floryanow alias Narol Miasto, in 1751 as Floryianow alias Narol, 1788 as wies Narol, in 1794 as Narol, in 1886 as Narol (rus. Naril), Narol Stary lub Narol Wies (rus. Naril Staril, or Naril Sielo-Sieło), ...., finally in the 20th century under Poland as Narol [Miasto], Narol Wies [Narol Wieś].

Main source: Nazwy Miejscowe Polski, Historia, Pochodzenie, Zmiany [The Names of the Local Places in Poland, History, Origin, Changes], under team of Prof. Kazimierz Rymut, Pracownia Toponomastyczna Instytutu Jezyka Polskiego PAN, Krakow 2007, t. VII Mą-N.

Finally for today, I don't want to exclude some of the names of the local places have the Kurdish, Ruthenians - Rusyns - Carpathian Highlanders - Ukrainians, Valachians, Grand Moravians, Slovacs, Hungarian, German, etc. roots and origin, but it has be taken into account that some of the names given in this article, including your Rebizanty, have the roots going directly from the [old} Polish language.

Have a nice all this Tuesday,

Your, Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw, Poland
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TadWysocki



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Post Posted: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:23 am      Post subject:
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POLISH FAMILY NAMES REBIZANT, MAZYLAK, AND LEWKOWICZ

Uncovering the family name origin and an ethnic heritage, we need the geographical exact location, and the imagination of the ancestors' life from the exact time. In this case we can find and imagine the place in SE Poland named Huta Rozaniecka, and all villages and settlements located around. In the end of the 18th century we can find there many places named as [thus, we can tell some informations on the local economy, customs, traditions, deceases, etc. from the 18th century and earlier]: Huta ....... [meaning in Polish a small foundry], Hamernia [meaning a blacksmith workshop, derived from Germany language and word hammern], Mazily [from Polish Maz~, meaning a place where the wood tar was produced], Majdan ..... [meaning a logging in wood, derived from Ukrainian language, this from Turkish language and word Mejdan - a square, a marketplace, etc.], Paary [from Polish para, meaning a hot air going from foundry production], etc.

In the years 1772-1795, after 3 political partitions in Europe, this quiet land was suddenly divided by the border of Russian Empire, and Austrian Empire. We can only imagine one day in the end of the 18th century The New Settler decided to construct his new home/establish a hamlet nearby the Huta Rozaniecka just on the small river Tanew. His new home was located just at the place named by local inhabitants as "Zamczysko" [a castle] and "Kosciolek" [a little church], where the very old soil stronghold from the 12th-13rd century was located, but only small bullwarks covering by trees remained, and also where from that times the old wooden little church and monastery was constructed in the old centuries, this was a Unitate church and Basilian monastery under the name of Sw. Jan Nepomucen, as the filia of the GC parish in Tomaszow. The church with cemetery, and monastery was abandoned by the Basilian Monks in the 18th century, finally, accodring to local authorities decision from 1796 was totally disassembled.


FAMILY NAME REBIZANT

If in abt 1799 this New Settler Teodor Lewkowicz from a new hamlet was going to the parish to registrate and baptize his new born first child, the parish registrar would ask him what would be the name of the child, and his place of birth. Our New Settler gave the name of the child as Maria, and the name of his new settlement as for example "Rebizanty" or "Bazylianty" [the Polish suffix -anty for place name] - maybe "Bazylianty" as the people respected very much the memory about religion and Basilian monks. The registrar, maybe the parish parson, knowing very well Polish and Latin language would tell "Oh no, Bazylianty is too holy for your hamlet as a civil person, let's oficially confirm and record this place as "Rebizanty", as I very well know, as a priest, what the people are doing there to survive hard times, and to financially support my church".

Why the registrar would tell and write in family records the place name as "Rebizanty"? Why people had there a nickname "Rebizant". Here is the explanation with Polish, and Latin language with the Polish word "rebelizant", shortened to "rebizant": The Polish word "Rebelizant" is going directly from old Polish language [Jezyk Staropolski], this from Latin language and word "rebellis". Slownik Polskiego Jezyka [The Dictionary of the Polish Language] gives "rebelizant" as the rebeliant, buntownik - the person acts against law, insurgent, with this first meaning it was noted for eg in the 17th century by famous diarist of Polish Baroque Jan Chryzostom Pasek, who wrote: "bo Tekieli, rebelizant, ktory przy Turkach...", in the memoirs of the prince Albrycht Stanislaw Radziwill "Rebelizant z ojcem cesarski, który shizac w wojsku Gustaba, w zamku Brodnicy zyd i wojowac przestal", in the 18th century Polish preacher Samuel Wysocki wrote in his harangues "przed dubrym Panem, rebelizant przed Krolem, wyrodek brzydki...". In the following centuries in Poland the word "Rebelizant" would be shortened to "Rebizant", meaning still a person acts againt law, but as a trader, smuggler, especially in the places located on the borders, and to "Rebizanty" as the place where the traders/smugglers were inhabited.

Slownik Geograficzny..... (The Geographical Directory od the Kingdom of Poland), 1880-1902, confirmes the place name Rebizanty aka Ribizanty, as the few homes nearly located Huta Rozaniecka, in the powiat (county) Cieszanowski.

The last conclusion in this subject: If one day the New Settler from "Rebizanty" would ask to change his family name just to prevent the new born childs before any family future persecution (I met same situation in Polish genealogy with changing the family names, the reasons were very different), the parish registrar would accept the new family name as Rebizant, thus, creating it in the easiest toponymic way.

I see from your family tree, your Teodor Lewkowicz - Rebizant and his wife Maria nee family Mazylak had 9 children: Maria born 1799, Jan born 1801, Jakub born 1804, Semion born 1806, Anastazja born 1807, Mikolaj born 1813, Paraskewia born 1816, Pelagia born 1820, and Michal born 1824. Most of them in all the 19th century developed the hamlet named Rebizanty, some of the families Rebizant decided to sell part land to buy tickets for their childs to emigrate to America, I see amongst others three sisters Maria - Mary, Anna, and Alice - Alicja immigrated in the years 1911-..... We can only imagine how hard were their first years of their life in the new country.

Rest Rebizant's stayed in Poland, having hard life times in all the 20th century, meeting two cruel World Wars, and 45 years of communism time here after WWII Jalta political pact. I see with Polish internet, some of them have survived, and their descendents are trying to preserve the family history in Poland, like same you are doing in the U.S. Thank you!

The surname location in the present-day Poland: According to Polish census 1990 (I prefer this one, and not 2002, as 1990 is giving also the names disapeared), they were living in Poland 207 adults surnames Rebizant:
Rebizant 207 Wa:7, BB:4, Ch:5, Gd:2, JG:8, Ka:17, Lg:5, Lu:14, Ol:7, Op:6, Pl:3, Pł:2, Pr:35, Sd:1, Wr:4, Za:87

And as I told you in my message, very fortunately surname Rebizant has survived in this Rebizanty, living and farming there after 100 years of immigration of your family to the U.S. I'm so happy you visited this land.

FAMILY NAME MAZYLAK

This Polish family name Mazylak is cognominal in origin, belonging to that group of surnames derived from the very old Polish language, name, and word "maz" - fully spelled with Polish spelling as maz~, maź - having Polish z with Polish grammar diacritial mark over the letter, meaning "a wood tar, a grease". The surname Maz appears in Polish records as early as 1382, it is also found in the variant forms Mazelak, Mazela [1602], Mazyl, Mazyk, Mazik, Mazierak, etc.
As the basic root of the name is Polish "Maz", a term for a wood tar, I do suppose you might find the surname Mazylak applied at times to the first ancestor in old Poland who was the producer and/or trader of the wood tar products, the basic product in every farm and home, the producers of the wood tar grease exported it throughout Poland, and to the neighboured countries.

The surname location in the present-day Poland: According to Polish census 1990 the surname Mazylak disapeared from present-day Poland surname lists, here are the the records from other versions, as you see the Maz, Mazy, Mazyl are also with negative results.
Mazy 0 0
Maz 0 0
Mazyk 1 Kn:1
Mazyl 0 0

I suppose the surname Mazylak, as suffix -al was tipical for Ukrainian roots, maybe could be found now in the present-day Ukraine.

Finally, I see possibility your GGGGGMa was originated as Mazylak from the nearly located village Mazily, thus, the GC and RC parish was the Tomaszow (Tomaszow Lubelski) where the GC & RC records from the 18th and earlier could be researched by you in future.


FAMILY NAME LEWKOWICZ

This Polish family name Lewkowicz is patronymic in origin, belonging to that group of surnames derived from the very old Polish language, name, and word "Lewy", derived from Polish name Leon, and/or from the Jewish name Levi. The surname Lewkowicz appears in Polish records as early as 1441, it is also found in the variant forms Lewko [1363], Lewkowiec, , etc.
The suffix -icz, tipical for East Poland, would have a meaning - the son of Lewko.

The surname location in the present-day Poland: According to Polish census 1990, they were living in Poland 2943 adults surnamed Lewkowicz:
Lewkowicz 2943 Wa:158, BP:183, Bs:436, BB:13, By:14, Ch:101, Ci:23, Cz:14, El:151, Gd:129, Go:26, JG:81, Kl:7, Ka:97, Ki:20, Kn:6, Ko:78, Kr:31, Ks:1, Lg:43, Ls:7, Lu:97, Ło:17, Łd:34, NS:2, Ol:189, Op:38, Os:3, Pl:64, Pt:8, Pł:29, Po:48, Pr:61, Ra:7, Rz:22, Sd:6, Sr:4, Sł:12, Su:149, Sz:63, Tb:51, Ta:1, To:20, Wb:83, Wł:28, Wr:67, Za:124, ZG:97

Finally, I see with Polish Geneteka giving names from the 19th century, the possible origin of your your GGGGPa Teodor Lewkowicz as nearly located the town of Chelm/area (Chelm Lubelski) where the GC & RC & Jewish (I see also few Lewkowicz as Jewish in Chelm, as surname Lewkowicz was popular in Jewish communities) records from the 18th and earlier could be researched by you in future, here are the records only from the Geneteka, and parish Chelm:
Births: http://www.geneteka.genealodzy.pl/index.php?rid=1138&from_date=&to_date=&search_lastname=Lewkowicz&search_lastname2=&rpp2=50&rpp1=0&bdm=A&w=03lb&op=gt&lang=
Marriages: http://www.geneteka.genealodzy.pl/index.php?rid=993&from_date=&to_date=&search_lastname=Lewkowicz&search_lastname2=&rpp2=50&rpp1=0&bdm=B&w=03lb&op=gt&lang=
Deaths: http://www.geneteka.genealodzy.pl/index.php?rid=2353&from_date=&to_date=&search_lastname=Lewkowicz&search_lastname2=&rpp2=50&rpp1=0&bdm=S&w=03lb&op=gt&lang=

They were Lewkowicz also in other towns/parishes, sorry, that with your Rebizanty the archival records are accessible only from 1785.


Hope this helps a bit in your search, with the best good luck!

Tadeusz "Tad" Wysocki
Warsaw, Poland

PS. Sorry any faults, and giving you wrong search paths, most of my conclusions are as the game with words and imagination only.

PS. Sheille, please correct this text with your eyes, my Polish is much better that my English, I've never been to England or the U.S., having English in my school and with my works only, thanks in advance!
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yuliya_loboda



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Post Posted: Sat Mar 30, 2024 2:11 pm      Post subject: To Shellie
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Hi Shellie! It's amazing discovery. More interesting, Im also discovering my family tree and it appears we have the same ancestors. I am so interested in the records you have about Teodor Rebizant and Maria Mazylak. I can read both latin(polish) and russo(Ukrainian) books. TIA
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Post Posted: Wed Apr 03, 2024 11:27 am      Post subject: Re: To Shellie
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Hi! Thanks for posting on this thread! I recent met another person with Todor and Maria in their tree. I am so thankful for Polish Origins because even very old messages can help bring families together. I am happy to hear more about your Rebizants. I have never found a Rebizant who did not trace their family back to Rebizanty, near Huta Rozaniecka. I will send you a private message.

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yuliya_loboda wrote:
Hi Shellie! It's amazing discovery. More interesting, Im also discovering my family tree and it appears we have the same ancestors. I am so interested in the records you have about Teodor Rebizant and Maria Mazylak. I can read both latin(polish) and russo(Ukrainian) books. TIA
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Post Posted: Wed Apr 03, 2024 5:41 pm      Post subject:
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Oh, please, text me in private. I'm new hear, I'm so glad you responded. the last Rebizant in my family tree was my granny's granny. we recently found some notary documents (after my granny's brother passed away), that's how I started to discover my family tree.My granny's 91 y.o.now. Her mother is Maria Żuk, daughter of Andrzej Żuk and Xenia Rebizant. I also discovered that Teodor Rebizant and Maria Mazyliak were parents of Ioan Rebizant. And His wife, Ahaphia, was a daughter of another Rebizant - Cosmo and Tatianna Koszel. They (Ioan and Ahaphia) were parents of Xenia's father Theodore Rebizant. Im so interested what metrical pages you have))
I whould tell a little story. Xenia Rebizant and Andrzej Żuk were rich people, they had a lot of lands in their ownership. They had sheep farm, bees, mills and fur or leather manufacturing. Many people living there were their employees. They lost everything after the WWII, their homes were burnt and looted. So I totally understand why your ancestors left their homes for another country before all this events. They were Galicians. So do I. Polish-Ukrainian mixed.
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yuliya_loboda



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Post Posted: Wed Apr 03, 2024 5:57 pm      Post subject: Rebizanty
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Also you can see, I have three of them in one generation: Theodore, Cosmo and Anna Rebizant.


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Maria Żuk is my great grandmother
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Shellie
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Post Posted: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:13 pm      Post subject: Re: Rebizanty
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Yulya,
I also have all of these names in my tree. I will introduce you to my friends and cousins who also have Teodor Rebizant and Maria Mazylak in their family tree. Thank you for sharing what you know about your family. Did Andrzej Zuk and Xenia Rebizant live in Grochy? In my research I found many Zuk lived in Grochy. I sent you a private message. Best regards!

yuliya_loboda wrote:
Also you can see, I have three of them in one generation: Theodore, Cosmo and Anna Rebizant.
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vpariy1



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Post Posted: Thu Apr 04, 2024 1:28 am      Post subject: Re: Rebizanty
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yuliya_loboda wrote:
Also you can see, I have three of them in one generation: Theodore, Cosmo and Anna Rebizant.


Hello, Yulia,

Thanks for writing on this forum. Ivan Rebizant and Agafia Rebizant are my 5th gen ancestors.

Interestingly, I also have Dawydko, Stupak and Zuk in my trees.

Lets connect together!

Regards
Vasyl
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