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Magdalena
PolishOrigins Team


Joined: 28 Aug 2007
Replies: 69
Location: Poland

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Post Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 3:58 pm      Post subject: The last Thursday before Lent - Tlusty Czwartek
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The last Thursday before Lent is really soon. What do you eat this day? In Poland nowadays almost obligatory is to eat pączki (donuts) or faworki. I am sure that you know many kind of donuts, but have you ever tried faworki? If not you can do it this year. Here is one of many possible recipes, so you can do it yourselves.

Faworki
1. 35 decagrams of flour
2. 1 spoon (a soup one) of butter
3. 3 yolks
4. 1 egg
5. 10 decagrams of thick cream (7 spoons)
6. 1 spoon of spirit or 2 ones of vodka or 1 spoon of vinegar
7. lard of oil (for “deep” frying)
8. icing sugar

- Use ingredients 1-6 to knead a dough.
- Roll it out thinly.
- Cut rectangles about 2,5-8 centimeters (1-3 inches).
- Cut each in the center along the longer side (but not to the end) and put one of ends in this slot. You will get a kind of a slack knot.
- Fry it in hot oil or lard not too long only till it will get gold color.
- Sprinkle faworki with icing sugar
and bon apetit Exclamation
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NancyM
PolishOrigins Matka Chrzestna


Joined: 14 Dec 2007
Replies: 185
Location: Massachusetts, USA

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Post Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 7:21 pm      Post subject:
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sounds yummy, Magda.

I have never heard of "decagrams" so I went searching to see what I could find.

One website http://www.blurtit.com/q239932.html said

1 gram equals 0.0352 ounces.
1 decagram equals 0.352 ounces.
50 decagrams equal 17.6 ounces.

I found another answer at http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/QQ/database/QQ.09.04/peg1.html

"20 decagrams of sugar is 1 cup of sugar "


For the past few years, the grocery stores here have been packaging and selling "Paczki" -- they put up a sign that says:

"Paczki ... Not just another donut!"
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eastsider



Joined: 02 Dec 2008
Replies: 8
Location: Troy, Michigan

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Post Posted: Wed Dec 03, 2008 11:10 pm      Post subject:
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Thank you Nancy for looking up decagram. That recipe does sound good.
Here we eat paczkis on the Tuesday before Lent. We call it Fat Tuesday or Paczki Day. Then Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. We get them from Hamtramck, where they make them fresh.
I'm going to try that recipe Magda.
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Patrycja411



Joined: 09 Jul 2009
Replies: 1

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Post Posted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:47 pm      Post subject:
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That's right, eastsider. Here in America we have "Pączki Day," which is celebrated to coincide with "Fat Tuesday." But in Poland, Poles eat their pączki on the Thursday before Lent begins.

I believe "Tlusty Czwartek" literally means "greasy Thursday," but I'm sure Magda can confirm that. Great name for that day!

I'm not sure how we Americans moved it to Tuesday -- perhaps to compete with New Orleans' Mardi Gras. It's interesting what we do here in Polonia (Polish America) as compared to Poland itself. The word "Busia" for example... as far as I know, only American Poles use the word. I've never heard anything but Babcia from a Polish person. Same is true for Polka music -- very popular with Poles in America, but I'm not sure if ever took as strong a hold in Poland itself. And even the customs we consider to be "Polish" at weddings here in the U.S. are not even used in Poland.

So I include Pączki Day as one of those traditions that have become truly Polish American.
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Magdalena
PolishOrigins Team


Joined: 28 Aug 2007
Replies: 69
Location: Poland

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Post Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 2:46 am      Post subject:
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Of course you are right, tłusty means greasy and this name suits perfectly to this day.



About Busia I have my personal and completely not confirmed Laughing theory: In Polish we can create many dimunitive forms of one word and I can imagine babcia as babunia or babusia (something like mama (mother) –mamunia - mamusia). So maybe it is the source of this word.



Magda
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Zenon
PolishOrigins Team Leader


Joined: 28 Apr 2007
Replies: 1477
Location: Poland

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Post Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 3:56 am      Post subject:
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Fat (or Greasy) Thursday is tomorrow Exclamation As you already may know we in Poland celebrate it by eating as many Pączki as possible. In the US some of you moved the Fat Thursday to Fat Tuesday (in Polish 'Ostatki' - the last day before Lent). But don't worry, I think you can celebrate it twice even if your think you are not Polish at all Wink. And thanks to that you have plenty time to prepare for the second 'celebration' on Tuesday.

See the video from Pączki day in Chicago.


[html-link]


Comment to the video: click on 'Listen' icon in this link to hear how "pączki" is pronounced correctly in Polish.
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Bogusz



Joined: 13 Jan 2015
Replies: 11

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Post Posted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 11:10 am      Post subject:
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Today is Fat Thursday! It is the day in which Poles eats lot of sweets, especially donuts. For centuries, donuts have changed the form and composition, but today the most popular form are the donuts with jam inside. However, my grandmother still bakes donuts such as this one from the recipe of Lucyna Ćwierczakiewiczowa. About 100 hundrefd years ago it was the most popular Polish cookbook. Today we decided to translate one of the recipes for you - recipe for donuts of course. Enjoy it.

ĆWIERCZAKIEWICZOWA’S RECIPE FOR DONUTS



From the book „365 obiadów” (365 dinners) by Lucyna Ćwierczakiewiczowa.



Small cooked donuts are fine mincemeat, without jam, served hot, half or less then half the size of normal donuts.

Infuse a half pound of flour with a full quart of hot milk. Keep crushing until its cool down, than pour in two lots (1 lot is about 12-13g) of yeast crushed in the quarter of a pound of sugar. Froth the egg white, put it into the dough, and leave it to rise.

When it is ready, add another quart of flour, making sure that the dough is as loose as for cakes. Add salt and something for smell. Add a dash of nutmeg or two bitter crashed almonds. When the dash is well kneaded, add a quarter of a pound of melted butter and knead until it comes off from a spoon well. Put it to rise in a warm place and make sure dot it doesm’t overgrow.

As soon as it begins to grow, immediately start making donuts: throw the dough on a pastry board, roll out with a hand, than dip a glass of wine in a flour and cut a small donuts with it, and give them a form. Put on a sieve and keep in warm.

When all are ready, prepare a lot of fat (lard) in a saucepan. Preheat. You can try with a dough if it is hot enough. Throw donuts into the saucepan. Remove them with the skimmer and sprinkle immediately with powdered sugar. Heat shouldn’t be to high because donuts would immediately brown and remain slack inside. Who wants to, can add a clarified butter to lard, but this is unnecessary, because these donuts should be served hot, and the lard should be used just to bake them. Donuts are baked, but don’t absorb fat.



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